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Rumorpile: Ford's Next-Generation Mustang Going Global


G. Noble
Editor/Reporter - CheersandGears.com
April 13th, 2012

Without a shadow of doubt, Ford’s Mustang is a red-blooded, all-American icon. Since the 1960s, the stallion-badged pony car has won the acceptance of a large number of enthusiasts and normal buyers alike, its abundant presence dominating paved surfaces ranging from boulevards to drag strips. Love it or hate it, it was the Mustang that gave us other revered models like Chevrolet’s Camaro and Dodge’s Challenger, and inspired the European Ford Capri and Japan’s Toyota Celica. Facts are facts; the automotive world would certainly be a very dull place without it.

However, while it has traveled to countries outside of North America like the UK and Australia as a grey-market import, the Mustang was never designed with a global market in mind. For example, the Mustang as-is cannot be converted to right-hand drive from the factory in Flat Rock, Michigan and aftermarket companies who can make it happen usually charge expensive prices. It has always been a car built by We the People, for the People and the People alone. Well, no more. If rumors circulating over at Popular Hot Rodding prove to be correct, that’s about to change with the next-generation Mustang, due for 2015.

According to PHR, the next-generation Mustang will be engineered with the ability to be reconfigured for right-hand drive markets, such as the UK. In fact, word has it that Ford will aggressively export the Mustang to Europe, Australia, and even Japan, and dealers in Europe are already being told to expect the Mustang as a regular model in showrooms. That means, for the first time, overseas buyers can drive a brand-new Mustang away from a lot and not have to worry about a dealer refusing to service and support the car. It’s also worth noting that Ford Europe development boss Barb Samardzich recently spoke to German automotive site Auto-Mototr-und-Sport, and was quoted as saying the next Mustang is being developed as a part of Ford’s global “One Ford” plan, meaning that the Blue-Oval pony car would meet European pedestrian safety standards.

Other than the buzz about the Mustang’s future global pedigree, additional rumors include that the sixth-generation model will likely shed weight, shrink in size, and ride on a new global rear-drive platform. It remains to be seen if that means additional rear-drive models will be built for the American market. The fact the car will ride on a new global platform will mean that the Mustang will probably join its Chevy and Dodge rivals and finally adapt to an independent rear suspension. And although the 5.0L “Coyote” V8 will remain under the hood, a hybrid powertrain may be the cards.

Recent Mustangs have been styled to be modern throwbacks to the days of the vintage models from the ‘60s and ‘70s. Although the retro approach to design has been met with near unanimous approval, the next-gen car will have a fixed gaze on the future. According to PHR, Ford’s goal is to take the Mustang’s styling into the future while keeping it familiar, so that means traditional elements like the three-section taillights and scooped lower body lines will remain.

We’ll find out how much of the rumors prove to be true when the next-generation Mustang debuts in 2014, in time for its 50th anniversary.

Sources: Popular Hot Rodding, Auto-Mototr-und-Sport
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26 Comments

So it will be a clean break, like the '79 model? The '74 was just a continuation of the earlier cars in miniature, but the '79 was a clear break from the past... and it was a huge success.
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This should be very interesting to see how the mustang faithful take this.

Ocnblu was the 79 successful or was it due to the oil crunch that people bought up the 4 bangers? The quality of those cars was pretty sad as I remember my oldest sister bought a 4 banger 1980 model and by 50K miles it was burning oil and rattling apart.

Granted I will say their SVT mustang in the 80's was pretty cool.
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So it will be a clean break, like the '79 model? The '74 was just a continuation of the earlier cars in miniature, but the '79 was a clear break from the past... and it was a huge success.


According to the PHM article, the relationship between the next Mustang and the current model is similar to the relationship between the first-generation Mustangs ('64-ish to '73) and the second-gen Mustang II, with some Dearborn employees going so far as to calling the next car the Mustang III.

Again, that article has its share of speculation, but it's almost a sure-fire thing the next Mustang will shrink and go on a diet. I'm sure that's where the Mustang II comparisons are coming from because the Mustang II was certainly a lighter and smaller car than what went out the door in '73.

Design-wise, I'd say your reference to the third-gen 'Stang isn't too far off. I think the kicked-up hip lines, side scoops, gaping mouth, and three-element taillights will carry on, but it wouldn't suprise me at all if Ford's "kinetic" design language is used heavily throughout the car.

This should be very interesting to see how the mustang faithful take this.


Many of them are almost livid about it. Perhaps not completely up in arms like they were when the Probe was preparing to replace the third-generation model in the '80s, but they're worried the car will lose a lot of its charm.

I don't honestly understand that — I guess because I've never owned a Mustang because the one of the good, later-model GT models have typically been out of my financial reach — because the lighter weight, smaller size, independant rear-suspension, and steering tuned for European backroads will only make the Mustang that much more formidable. I mean, thinking about the straight-line brutality of the current Shelby model married to more delicate, precise steering ... I think the next Shelby Mustang will give plenty of more expensive cars something to worry about.

Not only that, but since the model will be sold worldwide, worldwide demand could mean the aftermarket for the next Mustang will be huge and everything will be dirt cheap to buy. Sure, prices for aftermarket Mustang parts are cheap already — it's to the point now where you can restore a '60s model for the price of a value-menu hamburger and build your own Saleen rival with the change between your couch cushions — but with a global market behind it ... just think about that.
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I'm looking forward to it... I've had a few Mustangs over the years (2 Foxes-'86 and '87) and I like the '05-10 and '11+ cars quite a bit, but I'm interested to see where they go next, evolving beyond retro.
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the lot I am at, we sometimes store the excess Fords, the folks that get sent over to look at the Mustangs are almost entirely old geezers, obviously with some dough. I still wonder just how much the ipod generation gets into classic pony car style. Some do, I know. But do they have money?

Ford's other problem, the euro styling is not connecting with everyone......Ford is sort of alienating some folks. Had a cust. yesterday that had driven the new Focus and hated it. Also had a friend who bought an Elantra, was pretty much gonna buy the focus until he drove it. Said he did not like it at all.

Whatever Ford does with the car, I think it still needs the attitude and character of what most folks expect of the Mustang.
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Probe


I don't think this is going to be like the Probe..unlike the Probe, the next Mustang is still RWD w/ available V8..the good stuff remains plus the addition of a modern rear suspension and presumably a loss of weight...should make for a better car. I have a feeling the styling will still be distinctly Mustang, I don't think it will adopt the ugliness of the Fiesta or Focus.

I could see Ford also doing a small FWD sports coupe based off the Fiesta or Focus for the youth market...though it seems the compact FWD coupe market is largely dead.
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Sure, prices for aftermarket Mustang parts are cheap already — it's to the point now where you can restore a '60s model for the price of a value-menu hamburger and build your own Saleen rival with the change between your couch cushions — but with a global market behind it ... just think about that.


You need to move because your burger joints are too F'ing expensive. Use the couch with a ton of quarters (1lb quarters = $20) to finance your move.
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Saw a new dark blue Mustang V6 driven by a young guy yesterday as I waited to cross the street in town. Manual transmission, I could tell by the rise and fall of the engine sound, which was pretty nice for a 6. A pleasant sight.
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You need to move because your burger joints are too F'ing expensive. Use the couch with a ton of quarters (1lb quarters = $20) to finance your move.


Forgive the hyperbole, but the Mustang is one of the cheapest classic cars to restore. I went to high school with a guy who owns a '66 and I've scanned through the catalogs. One Benjamin will buy you a new bumper or some new body panels. Two Benjamins will buy you a complete Pony interior kit.

Before I sold my '72 Cutlass to my father, I remember new bumpers cost about $300 to $400 bucks, ditto new sheetmetal. For the price it would take to buy an interior kit for a Mustang, I would have been lucky to buy a set of door panels for the Cutlass.

The Mustang is such an ubiquitous car here in America alone, prices for parts are stupid cheap. Hell, all you have to buy is a rolling body and you can essentially build a brand new '60s Mustang with a 302 for less than the price of a used, late-model V6 'Stang.

Again, with a global market backing up the next-gen model now at the very least, I'd say there will be a few bolt-on parts for the '15 model that you can buy with piggy bank money easy.

I could see Ford also doing a small FWD sports coupe based off the Fiesta or Focus for the youth market...though it seems the compact FWD coupe market is largely dead.


There's still a market for sporty compact coupes, it's just that none of the domestic automakers are building one. I see plenty of Kia Forte "C. Everett" Koups running around my neck of the woods.

For the record, Ford did build a Fiesta-based coupe for Europe in the late '90s — the Puma. I think Ford wouldn't have any trouble finding buyers for a new one.
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I see plenty of young guys, mostly college-age, tooling around in Mustangs of the V6 and GT variety. However, most of the GT/CS's, Shelbys and Bosses I've seen are driven by middle-aged guys.
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Being a young male (26 in July) who has always loved Mustangs and until recently owned a late model Stang (05 GT manual black on tan) I am concerned with this direction but I am going to reserve my opinion and try and have faith in Ford.

I hated the 90s - early 2000s Mustangs. When the early S197s came out in 2004-5 it was a revelation for me, it was exactly what a modern pony car should be. Ford has kept the S197 fresh and it's only gotten better with each model years since its introduction.

Even with the live rear end and no IRS its ride quality and handling is superb. I am currently living in NYC and don't a have a place to keep a car or any real need for one right now but come mid 2014 I should have enough money to finally have purchased my own place (outside of the city) at this point after having seen the new Mustang at the auto show that years I will either order a new one or if the styling and performance don't measure up I'll get the last year of the S-197.

Ford's recent track record gives me hope that they won't mess this up.
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All bets are on — the Mustang could be a 50/50 mix of the following:

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I do like that concept. I just hope the production car doesn't look like a straight Fusion coupe (which would be a different car). It's gotta keep some masculinity and muscle. And ditch those horizontal taillights for six-element sequentials.

Hmmm... if they continue those upper and lower side lines and let them intersect into a side scoop, DITCH the rear doors, and add the aforementioned Mustang taillights, they just might have themselves a new Mustang.

CHOP PLEASE!
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The new Mustang will not have the cues of that '68 model. Supposedly it will look far more like that concept above. As for going global, it is about time.
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The new Mustang will not have the cues of that '68 model. Supposedly it will look far more like that concept above. As for going global, it is about time.


Like I said in the other thread, I don't know if I would bet all of my money on what Michael Ramsey is saying in the WSJ article you're undoubtedly referring to. Other sources strongly indicate that some traditional Mustang styling cues will remain and it will not look like "a body double for the Evos concept" like Ramsey said, hence why I posted the '68.

Keep in mind I'm not saying I've personally seen it, I'm just going on what I've heard. It could very well be BS, but I've got a good feeling it won't be a production version of the Evos.

Anyway, CoolFords did a rendering yesterday of what they think the new Mustang will look like and I think it's a better indicator rather than just going on the styling of the Evos concept alone. I think the DB9-like glasshouse won't make it, though.

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Forgive the hyperbole, but the Mustang is one of the cheapest classic cars to restore. I went to high school with a guy who owns a '66 and I've scanned through the catalogs. One Benjamin will buy you a new bumper or some new body panels. Two Benjamins will buy you a complete Pony interior kit.


There is too much hyperbole in Internet writing today. There are better ways to demonstrate your wit.

I agree that some Mustangs are cheap to restore, you still get what you pay for. There are cheap, but awful parts for Camaros and Chevelles, too. However, I suppose GM's does keep slightly better tabs on the restoration part companies out there... but on eBay, anything goes.

Before I sold my '72 Cutlass to my father, I remember new bumpers cost about $300 to $400 bucks, ditto new sheetmetal. For the price it would take to buy an interior kit for a Mustang, I would have been lucky to buy a set of door panels for the Cutlass.


Can't compare the Cutlass to the Mustang... easily 10x as many Mustangs floating around out there. Sure, you can get a cheapo Chinese made bumper for your Mustang... but if the chrome falls off in 12 months and it rusts... or its not the right shape and requires 3 hours of body work to get it to fit right, its not a bargain... you're better off getting the $300-400 Mustang bumper that's chromed right and made from a good master mold.
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Can't compare the Cutlass to the Mustang... easily 10x as many Mustangs floating around out there.


That's the point I was ultimately trying to make. There are a billion Mustangs out there, and because its such an ubiqitious car it's cheap to hop-up or restore. Again, with the next model going global, the aftermarket for the new car has the potential to be absolutely massive — and that could mean cheap prices on, for example, simple bolt-on mods.

Sure, you can get a cheapo Chinese made bumper for your Mustang... but if the chrome falls off in 12 months and it rusts... or its not the right shape and requires 3 hours of body work to get it to fit right, its not a bargain... you're better off getting the $300-400 Mustang bumper that's chromed right and made from a good master mold.


None of the parts I've been referring to were Chinese made to my knowledge. Then again, prices could've went up since I flipped through those catalogs.
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The Mustang catalogs I've perused have been for California Mustang and Year One....bought a few parts from Year One for my '87. I remember back in '85-86 when my Dad and I restored the '69 we got a lot of NOS parts from Ford dealers and found some clean salvage yard parts, and some from the California Mustang catalog (they've been around forever).
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The Mustang catalogs I've perused have been for California Mustang and Year One....bought a few parts from Year One for my '87. I remember back in '85-86 when my Dad and I restored the '69 we got a lot of NOS parts from Ford dealers and found some clean salvage yard parts, and some from the California Mustang catalog (they've been around forever).


It's funny now that I think of it. I think there are quite a few states that have more than one company which sells Mustang parts out of a mail-order catalog. I know Kentucky alone has Kentucky Mustang based out of Jeffersonville and Doc's Mustang based out of Nicholasville.
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The Mustang catalogs I've perused have been for California Mustang and Year One....bought a few parts from Year One for my '87. I remember back in '85-86 when my Dad and I restored the '69 we got a lot of NOS parts from Ford dealers and found some clean salvage yard parts, and some from the California Mustang catalog (they've been around forever).


It's funny now that I think of it. I think there are quite a few states that have more than one company which sells Mustang parts out of a mail-order catalog. I know Kentucky alone has Kentucky Mustang based out of Jeffersonville and Doc's Mustang based out of Nicholasville.


Yeah, there are shops that specifically restore Mustangs and yards that salvage them here in Arizona...I don't recall any Ohio-specific ones, but I'm sure there are some. When my Dad and I worked on the '69 the challenge was finding rust-free panels in E. Ohio/W. Pa/WV Panhandle....that was before the repro floor pans, quarter panels, etc became available.
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That's the point I was ultimately trying to make. There are a billion Mustangs out there, and because its such an ubiqitious car it's cheap to hop-up or restore. Again, with the next model going global, the aftermarket for the new car has the potential to be absolutely massive — and that could mean cheap prices on, for example, simple bolt-on mods.


Yeah, but you can't put a '66 bumper on a 2015 Mustang... so each gen stands on its own, as if its a different model. The next Mustang is going to sell between 75~100K a year, and I see no reason why it would have any hotter aftermarket than the current Mustang. In fact, I'd argue the old fogeys buying the retro Mustang have more disposable income and are more likely to get their hands dirty than a nextgen Mustang that may attract a younger buyer. Sure, there are some hardcore, hands-on "sport compact" garage tuners out there... but they are grossly outnumbered by "sport compact" guys whose talents end at air filters, fart pipes and dragon decals. Worse, Ford is assuming they will convert a large percentage of these guys, who prefer 4 cylinders and FWD anyway. Luckily for Ford, I think the fogeys will buy a modern Mustang or a retro Mustang... as long as its got the 5.0 and RWD.

And for quality upgrade parts for the current Mustang, its not exactly cheap. Ford likes to revamp the engines more than GM, so the upgrades are more targeted. For Camaro upgrades, the same parts will fit a larger range of cars with relatively minor differences or tuning... so Chevy parts for the LSx series of engines are potentially able to be cheaper. The 2016 Camaro is not out yet, but assuming GM doesn't completely overhaul the LSx series, a supercharger from a 2004 GTO would fit with a few tweaked accessories.

Disclaimer: I don't really cross shop Ford parts, as I don't have a Ford (aside from the dump truck), and likely never will... But my quick perusals of the Mustang section of various catalogs never looked like good value.
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The new Mustang will not have the cues of that '68 model. Supposedly it will look far more like that concept above. As for going global, it is about time.


Like I said in the other thread, I don't know if I would bet all of my money on what Michael Ramsey is saying in the WSJ article you're undoubtedly referring to. Other sources strongly indicate that some traditional Mustang styling cues will remain and it will not look like "a body double for the Evos concept" like Ramsey said, hence why I posted the '68.

Keep in mind I'm not saying I've personally seen it, I'm just going on what I've heard. It could very well be BS, but I've got a good feeling it won't be a production version of the Evos.

Anyway, CoolFords did a rendering yesterday of what they think the new Mustang will look like and I think it's a better indicator rather than just going on the styling of the Evos concept alone. I think the DB9-like glasshouse won't make it, though.

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Sweet looking Chop! :metal:
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That's an awesome chop.
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This could end up keeping the Mustang faithfull happy and pull in younger people.
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