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    2015 Frankfurt Motor Show: 2017 Volkswagen Tiguan Grows Up


    • Volkswagen Makes the Tiguan Slightly Larger


    On the eve of the Frankfurt Motor Show, Volkswagen has introduced the second-generation Volkswagen Tiguan.

     

    The new model looks to be a smaller version of the Tiguan. As for overall size, the Tiguan has grown 2.4 inches in overall length, 1.2 inches in overall width, and 1.3 inches lower. Overall weight has dropped 110 pounds thanks in part to the Tiguan moving towards the MQB platform.

     

    The interior takes a lot of ideas from the Golf in terms of design with a similar dash design and placement of various controls. Available on the options list is a 12.3 screen in the instrument cluster that provides various information and a heads-up display.

     

    For the European marketplace, Volkswagen will offer eight engines - both gasoline and diesel - ranging from 123 to 237 horsepower. Front-wheel and Volkswagen's 4Motion all-wheel drive will be available.

     

    Volkswagen also revealed the Tiguan GTE concept which pairs a 1.4 TSI four-cylinder with an electric motor to produce a total output of 215 horsepower. A 13 kWh battery offers 31 miles of electric-only range.

     

    Volkswagen says the 2017 Tiguan will go on sale in Europe next spring. As for the U.S., Volkswagen hasn't said when we'll be seeing it. But the German automaker has announced a seven-seat version destined for U.S. and China will be shown next fall.

     

    Source: Volkswagen

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    VOLKSWAGEN REVEALS ALL-NEW EUROPEAN TIGUAN AT THE FRANKFURT INTERNATIONAL MOTOR SHOW

     

    Sep 14, 2015

     

    Based off the MQB platform, the new Tiguan revolutionises the compact SUV

    • Powerful, authentic SUV design of the new Tiguan was completely reconfigured
    • Tiguan is the first Volkswagen Group SUV to be based on the modular transverse matrix (MQB)
    • Longer, wider, lower – new vehicle architecture enables sportier proportions
    • Tiguan makes its debut at the IAA in an R-Line® version, a classic on-road version and a version with an off-road front end
    • Front Assist with City Emergency Braking and Pedestrian Monitoring, active hood, Lane Assist and the Automatic Post-Collision Braking System are fitted as standard
    • 520 litres of cargo capacity (additional 50 litres) and considerably more space in the rear thanks to longer wheelbase
    • Broader range of power (92 kW / 125 PS to 176 kW / 240 PS) and up to 24 percent better fuel economy
    • Arrives on the market in April 2016
    • Volkswagen is also showing the Tiguan GTE concept in Frankfurt with a plug-in hybrid drive and 1.9 litre per 100 km fuel consumption
    • Newly conceptualised solar roof module for the Tiguan GTE increases its electric driving range


    Wolfsburg / Frankfurt, September 2015 — After selling over 2.64 million of the first generation Tiguan SUV, Volkswagen is showing the newly developed European Tiguan at the Frankfurt International Motor Show. In this case, "new" means completely new, a revolution instead of an evolution. The second generation Tiguan is the first Volkswagen Group SUV whose design is based off the forward-looking MQB platform.

     


    On-road, off-road and plug-in hybrid

     

    Volkswagen is showing four versions of the new Tiguan simultaneously at Frankfurt. The production versions are the very sporty Tiguan R-Line®, the classic on-road model and a special off-road version. Meanwhile, the Tiguan GTE concept vehicle that has a 160 kW/218 PS plug-in hybrid drivetrain shows how the best-selling compact SUV could further develop. The Tiguan GTE is equipped with a solar module that generates renewable electricity that is fed into the battery, enabling up to 1,000 additional kilometres of zero emissions electric driving.

     

    A-SUV segment is booming

     

    According to Volkswagen forecasts, the A-SUV segment will increase its global sales from 8.17 million today to more than 8.93 million units by 2018, which represents 9 per cent growth. The new Tiguan is optimally tailored for the requirements in this market segment. Perfectly thought out from the first to the last millimetre, it appeals to millions of car drivers and their families as a spacious and flexible companion for their everyday business and personal lives – an all-round vehicle of a new era.

     

    The first generation Tiguan launched at the end of 2007 and to date, more than 2.64 million units have been produced. Even though the next generation is ready to take over, Volkswagen earned first place in SUV new vehicle registrations in Germany once again in July 2015 – just as it did in the previous months and years. The general trend of rapid growth in the A-SUV segment is reflected par excellence in this model series. In 2014, more than 500,000 Tiguans were produced, which was 9 per cent more than in the prior year.

     

    Product offensive – Volkswagen SUVs in all classes

     

    For Volkswagen, the new Tiguan marks the beginning of an SUV product offensive. In upcoming years, the brand will be launching other innovative SUVs that are tailored to specific markets in a wide variety of segments worldwide. Volkswagen will be extending the range of SUV vehicles it offers, especially in the U.S. Forecasts indicate that the SUV share will also increase significantly in China and that additional SUV growth will also occur in Europe. Unlike in Europe, drivers in the U.S. and China prefer versions with a longer wheelbase, which is the reason the new Tiguan was systematically developed for two different wheelbases from the start. The "long" Tiguan will be introduced to specific markets starting in the Fall of 2016.

     

    "The Compact SUV."

     

    The MQB architecture improves all aspects of the Tiguan. The proportions of the latest Volkswagen SUV are even sportier, the design is truly charismatic, and the vehicle's weight was reduced by more than 110 pounds compared to the previous model. A gigantic leap forward has been made in terms of the vehicle's interior and trunk space: the capacity of the trunk has increased by 1.8 cubic feet, to 18.4 cu ft, and the load space can be enlarged to 21.8 cu ft by sliding the rear bench seat forward, by up to 7.1 inches. When the rear seat is folded, the cargo capacity is 58.5 cu ft, a gain of 5.1 cu ft.

     

    The engines are more efficient as well. A broad range of eight engines are offered, ranging in output from 92 kW / 125 PS to 176 kW / 240 PS. The engines are more powerful, yet they are up to 24 per cent more fuel-efficient than the Euro 5 engines in the previous model. The new 4MOTION® Active Control system also makes it easier than ever to adapt the all-wheel drive to all possible conditions. The Tiguan is now designed to tow loads up to 5,512 pounds.

     

    The new Tiguan has class leading connectivity and driver assistance features. The assistance systems include standard Front Assist with City Emergency Braking and Pedestrian Monitoring, Lane Assist and Automatic Post-Collision Braking System. Connectivity services include automatic accident notification, online traffic and parking space information, and a vehicle status report, while App-Connect integrates all current smartphone platforms with the infotainment system.

     

    The result is a Tiguan which extensively redefines the A-SUV segment. It’s an SUV that satisfies all expectations – both on-road and off-road.

     

    Safety plus

     

    New features include a pyrotechnically activated mechanism – similar to an airbag – integrated in the hood. This mechanism raises the hood as soon as a person comes into contact with it in a crash. This increases the gap between the hard engine and the relatively soft bonnet and thereby reduces the intensity of dangerous head injuries.

     

    Among the new Tiguan’s safety features, are the Automatic Post-Collision Braking System, the Front Assist ambient monitoring system including City Emergency Braking and – a new feature – Pedestrian Monitoring as standard. If the radar-based Front Assist of the Tiguan detects a person walking into the road, the system warns the driver. In a second step, it brakes the car. The new Tiguan is also equipped with Lane Assist as standard. This camera-based assistance system warns and automatically countersteers if the driver begins to unintentionally depart from the driving lane without activating a turn indicator.

     

    Exterior design

     

    The new, larger dimensions and proportions elevate the Tiguan from the previous model. At 176.6 inches in length, the new model is 2.4 in longer, and its wheelbase has been increased by 3.0 in to 105.6 in. The new vehicle is 72.4 in wide, which is 1.2 in more than before. Meanwhile, its height was reduced by 1.3 in to 64.3 in on the base, front-wheel-drive model. The coefficient of drag of the new Tiguan was reduced to 0.31 as well, thanks to numerous aerodynamic improvements, such as the door mirrors that were perfected in wind tunnel testing and airflow simulations: this has resulted in a 40 per cent reduction in overall air drag losses on the body.

     

    The front end of the new Tiguan has a significantly wider stance. This is attributable to an actual increase in physical width plus the visual effect of the horizontally aligned radiator grille and headlights. The Tiguan is the first Volkswagen SUV to be equipped with dual LED headlights. Above the headlights, a chrome strip runs across the front of the car. Above the radiator grille and the headlights, the V-shaped hood shoots toward the windshield.

     

    The vehicle's side profile is extremely distinctive. The waistline is higher compared with the previous model, which emphasises the SUV style. The character line is also higher and extends over the entire silhouette. The door handles are seamlessly positioned in this line. Beneath the upper line, a horizontal surface follows as a break, and then there is the second character line. Designers talk of a "line dialogue" here. The lower of these lines emphasizes the flared, powerful looking wheelarches and the shoulder section.

     

    In contrast to the previous model, the area above the character line is a flatter and has a more elegant band of side windows. This band extends into the dynamically angled D-pillars. The lowest section of the body is an anthracite-coloured area that wraps around the vehicle; the same colour is used for the rugged plastic trim around the wheelarches. A chrome trim strip separates the body colour surfaces and the anthracite cladding. This chrome accent is continued at the rear.

     

    The lateral character line becomes a defining rear element above the rear lights. The line defines the upper border of the standard LED rear lights that have a sharp horizontal cut. This cut is continued as a line between the rear lights and forms a trailing edge that is important aerodynamically. The tailgate opening was increased compared to the previous model, too. The lower part of the tail features an anthracite-coloured area and an aluminium-look diffuser that is integrated with the chrome-plated trapezoidal exhaust tailpipes.

     

    Interior

     

    The completely redesigned interior of the Tiguan has a decidedly sporty yet typically SUV character. The central elements are the instrument cluster (available as the digital Active Info Display) and the infotainment system that is positioned high in the centre stack and angled toward the driver. The dash panel and centre console form a single unit. The centre console itself is dominated by an array of buttons that are laid out around the gear lever. As on the exterior, the designers also systematically applied the "form follows function" principle and create a cockpit style atmosphere. The designers also emphasised the SUV nature of the interior in their choice of surface textures.

     

    Thanks to clever packaging, seating space has been significantly improved in the new Tiguan, which has 1.0 in more interior length. Three passengers in the rear seating area, for instance, have 1.1 in more knee room. The size of the luggage compartment has also increased. At 18.4 cubic feet, the cargo capacity of the new model has increased by 1.8 cu ft (with five persons on-board). In addition, the rear bench seat is asymmetrically split and adjustable longitudinally. The reclining angle of the seat backrest can also be adjusted. The cargo area can be enlarged to 21.8 cu ft by sliding the rear bench seat forward (by up to 7.1 inches). When the rear bench is folded, this results in a volume of 58.5 cu ft. If necessary, the backrest of the front passenger seat can be folded fully forward for stowing very long items. Last but not least, it is now even easier to load the Tiguan, because the load sill has been lowered further.

     

    An electronic marvel

     

    The new Tiguan is one of the world's most advanced compact SUVs, featuring an impressive array of innovations. First, there are technologies like the 12.3-inch Active Info display (interactive, fully digital main instruments with five information profiles) and the head-up display that is being offered for the first time in a Volkswagen SUV. Second, the vehicle's safety, convenience and connectivity have been taken to a new level by an array of driver assistance and infotainment systems.

     

    Even the base Trendline model has a number of advanced standard features. These include Front Assist that features City Emergency Braking and Pedestrian Monitoring as well as the active hood and the Lane Assist lane departure warning system. In addition, the safety equipment is completed by a network of seven airbags, including a knee airbag on the driver's side, and the Automatic Post-Collision Braking System; it helps to avoid secondary collisions. Comfortline mid-level trims have the Driver Alert System as standard.

     

    The top Highline trim is also equipped with adaptive cruise control (ACC), which utilizes radar to accelerate or brake the Tiguan and thus always maintain the correct distance to traffic ahead. If the SUV is equipped with DSG® in addition to ACC, it automatically handles stop-and-go traffic as well (traffic jam assist). Other Tiguan driver assistance systems include the optional Side Assist (lane-changing assistant), Pre-Crash proactive occupant protection (detects elevated collision potential, tensions the front seatbelts to preventively restrain the driver and front passenger and closes open windows and the sunroof to just a small gap), Emergency Assist (recognises if the driver is no longer responsive and brakes the car to a stop) and Area View (360 degree all-round view using four cameras that is especially useful off-road).

     

    Comfort and convenience

     

    The new Tiguan has a new three-zone automatic climate control system, called Pure Air Climatronic®. The technology, which is unique and so far only used by Volkswagen, keeps air quality at a consistently high level thanks to its air quality sensor and active biogenic filter, preventing pollutants from entering the car – from mold spores to allergens.

     

    Fully redesigned seats have optional electric adjustment, while the available Smart Comfort Seats automatically travel downward and back to make it easier to enter and exit the vehicle when the ignition is turned off. In addition, the new ergoActive seat includes electric 4-way lumbar support and massage function.

     

    Making trips long and short even more pleasant, the Tiguan has one of the largest panoramic sunroofs in the class (34.3 by 53.7 inches), which also features integrated ambient lighting. Other new comfort and convenience features include Easy Open / Easy Close (automatic opening or closing of the tailgate in response to a specific foot movement behind the Tiguan), a heatable steering wheel, and Volkswagen’s variable ratio electromechanical progressive steering.

     

    Infotainment and connectivity

     

    The Trendline trim is equipped with the Composition Touch radio system (5.0-inch monochrome touchscreen) as standard. The Tiguan Comfortline and Highline get the Composition Colour radio system (5.0-inch colour touchscreen) at no extra charge. The Composition Media radio system (8.0-inch colour touchscreen) is also available. Other options are the Discover Media and Discover Pro radio-navigation systems (both have 8.0-inch displays). All of these systems are part of the second generation modular infotainment matrix (MIB II).

     

    MIB II creates seamless connectivity with today's Apple and Android smartphones via App Connect. In addition to MirrorLink®, App Connect also integrates Apple CarPlay® and Google Android Auto™ into the infotainment systems. The Media Control app makes Volkswagen one of the first automakers to also offer an interface to the infotainment system for tablets. Volkswagen also offers a number of online services. Guide & Inform lets users access services such as latest traffic warnings, information on available parking spaces in nearby car parks (number of spaces and address) and information on filling stations (fuel prices and addresses). For the first time, Volkswagen is also offering Security & Service, which can be used to request assistance from the vehicle via a call centre. Some of the features integrated here are online road service call, automatic accident notification, service scheduling (to arrange maintenance appointments for the Tiguan with the service centre) and requesting the vehicle status report. Depending on the package that is selected, it may also be possible to use a smartphone to request vehicle status or parking location or activate the parking heater function.

     

    The smartphone itself can be placed conveniently in a newly designed and innovative interface box. The highlight here is that the phone can be charged and coupled to the vehicle's outside antenna inductively.

     

    Powertrains

     

    There are a total of eight Euro-6 compliant engines, all of which have turbocharging, direct injection, a stop-start system and battery regeneration as standard. The four TSI® gasoline engines produce 92 kW / 125 PS, 110 kW / 150 PS, 132 kW / 180 PS and 162 kW / 220 PS. The four TDI® diesel engines produce 85 kW / 115 PS, 110 kW / 150 PS, 140 kW / 190 PS and 176 kW / 240 PS. The base engines of the new Tiguan are launched with front-wheel drive, but all of the other engines are available with all-wheel drive either as an option or as standard. Compared to the previous model with Euro-5 engines, the four-cylinder engines in the new Tiguan are up to 24 per cent more fuel-efficient. Compared to previous Tiguans with Euro-6 engines, there is up to 10 percent better fuel efficiency.

     

    Not only are the engines more efficient, they are also more powerful. The highest powered TSI engine previously made 150 PS in Europe, but now has two 2.0-litre engines with 180 and 220 PS. With the diesel engines, the most powerful TDI used to make 184 PS. This engine now makes 190 PS, but the top engine is the newly engineered 240-PS unit with twin turbos charging and 2,500 bar of injection pressure. With 88 kW / 120 PS per litre of displacement, the 2.0 TDI has one of the highest specific power outputs in the A-SUV segment.

     

    4MOTION all-wheel drive

     

    Volkswagen offers the highly efficient 4MOTION all-wheel drive system in the new Tiguan, either as an option or as standard, depending on the chosen engine. Ground clearance of all Tiguan 4MOTION versions is 0.4 inches higher, at 7.9 inches. In addition, the Tiguan can be ordered with a special off-road front end package that allows for an approach angle is 25.6 instead of 18.3 degrees. The departure angle at the rear is 24.7 degrees for all versions, as is the ramp angle. Specially developed for the new Tiguan is 4MOTION Active Control – an off-road switch with four different modes. Regardless of whether the vehicle has an on-road or off-road front end design, the new Tiguan is engineered for towing more than 5,500 pounds.

     

    The 4MOTION all-wheel drive system uses a fifth-generation Haldex® coupling that actively distributes torque to all four wheels before slip occurs. In normal driving, only the front wheels are driven, saving fuel. But as soon as there is a risk of losing traction, the rear axle is variably engaged within fractions of a second. Along with the Haldex coupling, the electronic differential locks (EDS) integrated in the electronic stability control (ESC) system act as a transverse lock for all four wheels.

     

    The rotary/pushbutton switch for the new 4MOTION Active Control is located on the centre console. The driver uses it to activate four higher-level modes and various popup menus. When the driver turns the switch to the left, one of the Onroad or Snow profiles can be activated for on-road driving. When the driver pushes the switch in one of these modes, a popup menu appears on the infotainment system’s touchscreen, showing the driving profile selection with five profiles. When the switch is turned to the right, the driver can select one of the two off-road profiles: Offroad (automatic setting of off-road parameters) or Offroad Individual (variable settings). Here too, pressing the switch opens another menu level. When driving off-road, 4MOTION Active Control lets drivers switch the assistance systems in just seconds.

     

    Trim lines and packages

     

    The new Tiguan will be available in the Trendline, Comfortline and Highline equipment lines in Europe. All versions may be ordered with an off-road front end as an alternative. The Tiguan Comfortline and Tiguan Highline feature a sporty look with the 'normal' front end. The new R-Line packages make the SUV look even more dynamic. The Comfortline and Highline may also be ordered with the Design package or in the Exclusive equipment specification.

     

    The R-Line packages can be ordered as either a total package of exterior and interior features or an alternative exterior package. On the exterior, the R-Line features "Sebring" 19-inch aluminium-alloy wheels or optional 20-inch "Suzuka" alloys. Previously, Tiguans could only have rims up to 19 inches in diameter.

     

    Except for the wheelarches, all other anthracite body surfaces are painted in body colour, including the exclusive door trims which have the same visual effect as side sill extensions. The exterior design is finished by R-Line bumpers that have gloss black aerodynamic accents, a two-tone roof spoiler and a gloss black rear diffuser. The interior features R-Line seats (cloth and microfiber seat upholstery, optional "Vienna" leather upholstery), aluminium door sill guards with the R-Line logo that can be optionally illuminated, decorative stitching in Crystal Grey, special trim accents, stainless steel pedal caps and footrest, black headliner and a leather-trimmed multifunction steering wheel with the R-Line logo.

     

    Plug-in hybrid concept—with a solar roof!

     

    Wolfsburg / Frankfurt, September 2015 — Demonstrating the future directions the Tiguan might take is the Tiguan GTE – the first plug-in hybrid SUV from Volkswagen, which the brand is showing at the IAA. This Volkswagen, which is being presented as a concept vehicle, develops a system power of 160 kW / 218 PS and can cover a distance of up to 50 km in "E-Mode" driving as an all-electric zero-emission vehicle. Its average fuel consumption (combined) is a mere 1.9 l/100 km; this equates to a CO2 emissions figure of 42 g/km. The relatively long electric driving range not only benefits from the externally chargeable lithium-ion battery with an energy capacity of 13.0 kWh, but also from a solar module that is integrated in the roof – a world exclusive. Under ideal conditions, the energy that it generates annually is sufficient to add up to 1,000 km of driving range (Germany 500 km, Southern Europe 800 to 1,000 km), depending on the regional solar radiation power.

     

    TSI plus E plus DSG

     

    The concept car is driven via its front axle by a direct-injection turbocharged petrol engine (1.4 TSI with 115 kW) and an electric motor. The lithium-ion high-voltage battery supplies the electric motor with energy. The Tiguan GTE operates with a 6-speed dual-clutch gearbox (DSG) that was specially developed for hybrid use. The electric motor was integrated into the gearbox housing. Additional components of the hybrid drive include the power electronics (converts DC power from the battery to AC power for the electric motor) and a charger. The Tiguan GTE can be driven in the described E-Mode or in one of the three other modes Hybrid, Battery Charge, or GTE. After starting the drive system, the concept vehicle automatically drives off in "E-Mode". When a minimum charge level of the battery has been reached or when there is very high demand for power, the drive system automatically switches over to the "Hybrid" mode. This means that "E-Mode" is deactivated, and the Tiguan GTE now behaves like a classic full hybrid vehicle. It charges the battery regeneratively during deceleration and automatically uses the TSI and/or electric motor according to the driving situation. By pressing the "E-Mode" button, the driver can manually switch to zero-emissions operation if necessary. Exclusively driven by electric motor, the Tiguan then has a top speed of 130 km/h.

     

    GTE mode as boost function

     

    The driver presses the GTE button to switch to GTE mode, which activates the sporty side of the concept car. This GTE mode is an exclusive feature of all Volkswagen vehicles with a plug-in hybrid drive system. The characteristics of the accelerator pedal, gearbox and steering are made noticeably more dynamic, and the tuning of the TSI is more performance oriented. In addition, in the GTE mode the TSI and electric motor work together in what is known as "boosting" which makes the full system power and the maximum system torque available. The Tiguan GTE then has a top speed of 200 km/h and accelerates to 100 km/h in a short 8.1 seconds.

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    I really like the looks of the current generation and there's something about this that doesn't strike me as attractive. It did need to grow a bit as it was slightly undersized or the segment, good to hear it lost weight as well.

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    I tend to like this more than the current generation.  I think the current Tiguan has a bit of a roller skate look, this to me being longer, wider, lower is a bit more squared off, and looks a bit more trucky.  VW needs some more crossover sales, this might help.

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    Looks good with the big chunky wheels and nice interior. Will be interesting to see it in the flesh and pricing when it makes it over here.

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      Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700
      Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN
      Base Price: $62,500
      As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00
      20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00
      Trailering Equipment - $575.00
      Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00
      Compact Spare Tire - $350.00
      Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00
      Black Roof Rails - $295.00
      Black Splash Guards - $170.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Cadillac has been trying to position itself being as an alternative to German brands with models that offer exemplary handling characteristics and sharp designs. But the brand has the issue of models that don’t quite fit the image being presented. The SRX is the poster child for this. Yes, it had the sharp looks the brand was getting known for. But you wouldn’t call it sporty. It was more along the lines of a Lexus RX where luxury and comfort were the main priorities. Enthusiasts and critics were not pleased with this, but consumers gobbled them up. The SRX for a time was Cadillac’s best-selling model.
      Now we come to the successor of the SRX, the 2017 XT5. Those who were hoping for a change in the priorities will be disappointed as the XT5 doesn’t mess with the SRX’s recipe. But is that bad thing?
      Evolution is the impression you get when walking around the XT5. Cadillac’s designers didn’t make any drastic changes to the design profile aside from softening the Art & Science design language. The front now features a comically-large grille and headlights with a strand of LEDs that run into the bumper. Towards the back is an integrated spoiler that extends the roofline, a set of large taillights, and a rear bumper that comes with chrome exhaust ports and a faux skid plate. The XT5 does lose some of the polarizing details that made the SRX stand out, but it still stands out slightly in what is becoming a crowded class.
      Cadillac has been stepping up its game in terms of their interiors with their new models. Case in point is the XT5. Our top-line Platinum tester featured faux suede, leather, and wood trim on a number of surfaces that make it look and feel quite luxurious. We’re glad to see the removal of the Piano Black panel for the center stack as it looked out of place and was a magnet for fingerprints. One design idea we’re not so keen on is the gear selector. Instead of a lever, Cadillac went with a joystick controller to engage the various gears. The controller isn’t intuitive as you’ll find yourself going into the wrong gear or not going into one at all on a somewhat regular basis. You will get the hang of it after a bit, but you can’t help but wonder why Cadillac decided to change this in the first place.
      The leather used for the seats feel quite supple and help fix the issue of uncomfortable seats in the SRX. Interior space has grown, thanks to a two-inch increase in the wheelbase. Rear legroom has grown 3.2 inches and it allows anyone sitting back there to stretch out. Headroom is still slightly tight thanks in part to our tester coming with the optional panoramic sunroof. But this can be alleviated by recalling the rear seat slightly. Cargo space in smack dab in the middle - 30 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 63 cubic feet when folded.
      Cadillac User Interface (CUE) has been one of our least favorite infotainment systems to use since it was introduced a few years ago. The litany of problems ranging from a touch sensitive buttons not responding to inputs to the system crashing have dragged Cadillac down. But the system has been getting a number of changes and updates over the past few years. For starters, Cadillac has removed most of the touch-sensitive buttons from the system. Being able to press an actual button to turn on the heated/ventilated seats or adjust the temperature is really nice. It is a shame Cadillac didn’t bring back an actual volume knob for CUE - the touch-sensitive strip is still there. But at least there are volume controls on the steering wheel that allow you to avoid it. The system itself has been overhauled with a faster processor and a slightly improved interface. The changes make a difference as the system is snappier and a little bit easier to understand. If you still find CUE a bit overwhelming, you’ll be happy to know that CUE now features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration.
      Cadillac bucks the trend in the midsize luxury crossover class by only offering one engine - a 3.6L V6 producing 310 horsepower and 271 pound-feet of torque (@ 5,000 rpm). This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The V6 is the weak link in the XT5. When leaving a stop, it takes a moment for the engine to realize the accelerator pedal has been pressed before it starts working. This is even worse when you’re trying to make a pass as it seems the engine was busy taking a nap before it was hastily woken up. Once the engine is awake, it takes its time to get up to speed. There is a positive to the V6 engine and that is the stop-start system. Unlike some previous systems that are slow to restart the engine or do so in a very rough fashion, Cadillac’s system is quick and smooth when you let off the brake. The eight-speed automatic seems reluctant to downshift at times. We’re guessing this transmission was calibrated for fuel economy. At least the eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts.
      Fuel economy figures for the 2017 Cadillac XT5 all-wheel drive stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average fuel economy for the week landed around 22.3 mpg in mostly city driving. 
      One characteristic we liked about the SRX was its comfortable ride. Yes, it flies in the face of Cadillac’s message of beating the German’s at their own handling game. But buyers loved the smoothness on offer. Sadly, the XT5 loses a bit of the smoothness. Despite our tester featuring an adaptive suspension system, the XT5 wasn’t able to fully iron out bumps. Some of this can be attributed to 20-inch wheels fitted to our tester. At least the XT5 keeps road and wind noise out of the interior. Like the SRX, the XT5 isn’t sporty. Body motions are kept in check, but the light weight and nonexistent feel from the steering puts a halt to that idea. 
      An item Cadillac has been touting on the XT5 is the Rear Camera Mirror. Available only on the top-line Platinum, the mirror can stream the view from the rear camera by flicking a switch. We found this to be really helpful when backing out of parking lots as it gave a view that isn’t hindered by the thick rear pillars. Hopefully, Cadillac spreads this feature down to other trims of the XT5. 
      In some respects, the 2017 Cadillac XT5 is a step forward. The model improves on certain parts of the SRX such as a more luxurious and spacious interior, improved CUE system, and sharper looks. But in other respects, Cadillac messed up with the XT5. The 3.6L V6 needs to be shown the door and a new engine that offers better low-end performance to take its place. The loss of the smooth ride that the SRX was known for hurts the XT5 as well. Finally, there is the price. Our XT5 Platinum tester came with an as-tested price of $69,985. It is a nice crossover. But if we’re dropping close $70,000 on a luxury crossover, we can think of a few models that would be ahead of the XT5.
      It should be noted that the Cadillac XT5 has taken the place of the SRX of being the brand’s best selling model. At the end of 2016, Cadillac moved 39,485 XT5s. But unlike the SRX which we could recommend without hesitation, the XT5 comes with a number of caveats that we cannot do the same.
      Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XT5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Cadillac
      Model: SRX
      Trim: Platinum
      Engine: 3.6L V6 VVT DI
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700
      Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN
      Base Price: $62,500
      As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00
      20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00
      Trailering Equipment - $575.00
      Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00
      Compact Spare Tire - $350.00
      Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00
      Black Roof Rails - $295.00
      Black Splash Guards - $170.00
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00
    • By William Maley
      As Volvo finishes up the launch of their 90 series lineup, the company's focus will turn to the 40 series lineup. Speaking with Autocar, Volvo's R&D boss Henrik Green revealed the XC40 compact crossover will launch this fall. The model is expected to look somewhat similar to the Concept 40.1 shown last year and utilize the all new CMA platform that was jointly worked on by Volvo and their parent company, Geely. 
      Down the road, Volvo plans on launching other versions of the 40 Series such as a hatchback. 
      Also launching this year is the second-generation XC60. This is an important model for Volvo as it is their most popular model.
      “The XC60 is our biggest-volume car that sells broadly in Europe, China and America. It brings significant profits so is crucial in many aspects. [The new model is] a fantastic car, a big step forward,” said Green.
      Source: Autocar

      View full article
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