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    Frankfurt 2015: Infiniti Q30 Joins the Growing Group of Entry-Level Luxury Models


    • The Infiniti Q30 Joins the Growing Group of Entry-Level Luxury Cars


    A new entrant is coming into the entry-level luxury class. At an event on the eve of the Frankfurt Motor Show, Infiniti revealed the 2017 Q30 hatchback.

     

    The production model isn't much different from the concept at the shown at the 2013 Frankfurt Motor Show with a front end seen on a number of Infiniti sedans, and bold sculpting along the side. The interior is focused on the driver with a simple layout for the center stack and sport seats.

     

    The Q30 comes from the partnership of Diamler and Nissan. That means the Q30 has some bits of Mercedes-Benz's compact luxury car - the A-Class. It begins with Mercedes' 2.0L turbo-four with 208 horsepower for the U.S. Other countries will get a selection of gas and diesel engines producing 108 to 168 horsepower. Front-wheel drive will come standard, while all-wheel drive will come as an option. It isn't known at this time whether or not the U.S. models will get this option. A six-speed manual and seven-speed dual-clutch automatic will be available.

     

    Also coming from Mercedes is the front McPherson struts and rear multi-link suspension arrangement from A-Class. Infiniti has made some slight changes with their own settings for the shocks. A set of eighteen or nineteen-inch wheels will be available.

     

    We'll have more information on the Q30 before it launches in the U.S. sometime in the second quarter of next year.

     

    Source: Infiniti

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    Infiniti Q30: A new type of premium compact car

    • Q30 active compact is a vital part of Infiniti's global growth plans
    • Infiniti's first global entry in the compact segment attracts a new generation of premium buyers
    • Q30 features daring design that forges a unique path for a premium car
    • Confident dynamics deliver a holistic, intuitive driving experience
    • "Premium" and "Sport" versions allow for individual expression
    • World premiere at 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show on September 15, 2015


    Hong Kong – Making its world premiere at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show (September 15), the Infiniti Q30 active compact is a new type of premium vehicle for a new type of consumer. Representing Infiniti's first global entry into the fast-growing premium compact segment, the Q30 will play an important role in helping the company realize its plans for global growth.

     


    Designed for a new generation of buyers who are not willing to be defined by their choice of vehicle body type, the Q30 challenges convention with its bold character and daring shape. The car stays true to the signature design cues from the original 2013 concept and exemplifies Infiniti's design-led, customer-centric approach to product development. The unconventional stance and asymmetric interior contribute to an overall design that is certain to command attention.

     

    The development teams behind the Q30 have taken a holistic approach to its engineering, presenting a car that offers exceptional ride and handling. It feels comfortable yet "ready to go anywhere" thanks to the versatile dimensions, confident dynamics and intuitive technologies.

     

    In addition to the base model, two bespoke versions of the Q30 will be available: "Premium" and "Sport." Each will have its own unique personality, including design, dimensions and driving performance – offering premium compact buyers a choice that is specific to their personal needs and preferences.

     

    "Q30 makes a daring visual statement through its sculpted, concept car-like exterior, unconventional stance and asymmetric cabin design. The car has been engineered to exacting standards to deliver a driving experience that is unmistakably Infiniti. Q30 will accelerate the company's strategy to become a leading global manufacturer of premium cars."
    Roland Krueger, President of Infiniti

     

    Q30 is a vital part of Infiniti's plans for global growth

     

    The launch of the Q30 active compact comes at a moment of significant opportunity for the Infiniti brand, and it will play a vital role in global growth and strengthening of its presence in key sales regions.

     

    Infiniti sold a record 136,700 new vehicles worldwide during the first eight months of 2015, representing an increase of 14 percent compared to the same period in 2014. The brand also set records in China, Asia & Oceania, and EMEA (Europe, Middle East & Africa).

     

    In August alone, Infiniti posted global sales of 16,900, an increase of 19 percent over the same month last year. This marked the best August in Infiniti's history, and the brand has now reached a 12-month streak of best individual months on record. Sales records were set in many key markets, such as Australia, Canada, China, Latin America, Mexico, South Africa and West Europe.

     

    "These excellent results provide a strong foundation for future growth globally and in key regions, and the launch of Q30 means we're well positioned to carry forward this momentum."
    Roland Krueger, President of Infiniti

     

    The Q30 gives Infiniti the best platform from which to achieve its goals in key markets globally. It will become the company's first ever vehicle built in Europe at newly upgraded production facilities in Sunderland, United Kingdom. Representing a £250 million investment, plant extensions totalling over 25,000m2 will provide Infiniti with the production facility to satisfy the demands of premium vehicle manufacturing. A successful recruitment program has recently been completed, filling over 300 new jobs to support Q30 production.

     

    Q30 is the beginning of Infiniti's push to expand its product line-up

     

    With the launch of the Q30 active compact, Infiniti has started to deliver on the promise to expand and refresh its product portfolio within new premium segments.

     

    Staying true to the concept revealed at the 2013 Frankfurt Motor Show, the Q30 is an in-house development designed and engineered to meet exacting Infiniti standards.

     

    "Q30 is integral to Infiniti's commitment to offering a broader range of premium products in new segments, and is part of an intense product launch period that will see us further enhance our offer to an increasing number of customers."
    Roland Krueger, President of Infiniti

     

    Infiniti is adding new product at the right time, as data show that the premium compact segment is among the fastest expanding globally, and it is set to continue its growth trajectory as we approach the end of the decade.

     

    Infiniti entering the compact segment for the first time

     

    Representing the first vehicle of its kind for the company, Infiniti has dared to be bold and ambitious with the Q30 active compact. The car defies categorization with its rare shape and elevated stance. Its expressive design targets premium customers seeking urban individuality.

     

    "From the very beginning of product development, it was clear that Q30 presented an outstanding opportunity for Infiniti. The company's inspiration was to create a vehicle that mirrored the existence of a new generation of premium buyers."
    Francois Bancon, Infiniti Vice President Product Strategy

     

    Combining unique height and dimensions with coupe-like proportions, the Q30 conveys a "ready to go anywhere" attitude while maintaining an "at home in the city" versatility – perfect for those wanting to create their own unique experiences.

     

    Generations X and Y are a new breed of premium car buyers. For these buyers, a car is an expression of "self" rather than "status," and they insist on setting their own standards through unique, category-defying products. For them, personalising a brand is a means to individual expression – a "made for me" approach that is at the core of new luxury.

     

    To satisfy these demands, every decision that went into crafting the Q30 was made for the individual. For example, the alloy wheels allow for true personalization, with a laser-cutting process enabling the precise application of an accent colour of choice. The process is so precise that the bespoke colored lines can be as thin as 0.3mm, offering a subtle way of making the car your own.

     

    Complementing the bespoke nature of Q30, perceptual quality levels meet the expectations and high standards of buyers in the premium compact segment. Superior fit and finish details, both visible and tactile, are available across all grades. For example, a satin chrome-plated trim, rather than plastic chrome, gives Q30 a "cool-to-the-touch" feel, even in hot temperatures, while consistent use of black lacquer trim across wheel arches and side sills highlights the Q30's elevated stance, contributing to the strong, unique road presence of the vehicle.

     

    Q30 takes a design-led approach that forges a unique path

     

    Staying true to the design cues from the original 2013 concept, the Q30 active compact exemplifies Infiniti's design-led approach to product development.

     

    "Infiniti is an expression of design. We want our customers to feel the hand of the artist at work in the sculpted, muscular aesthetic of our cars. Q30 design is marked by turbulent character lines and sculptural shapes that look stretched over bone and muscle. The effect is a spontaneous feeling of harmonious design that can be appreciated at a glance."
    Alfonso Albaisa, Infiniti Executive Design Director

     

    An important, differentiating characteristic of the Q30's design is its combination of elevated stance with an overall height that is comparable with models in the traditional compact segment (1,495mm for base and Premium and 1,475mm for Sport). The result is a highly distinctive, coupe-like silhouette, which is further emphasised by a shallow side glass area.

     

    The Q30 takes Infiniti's signature design cues and evolves them into new dynamic shapes. The double-arch grille with 3D mesh, for example, has grown from the Q50, with a more fluid movement into the headlamps. The dramatic curves and turbulent lines flow up the signature double-wave bonnet, over the fenders and across the bodyline into the strong shoulder of the car. The signature C-pillar arcs forward in a dynamic crescent shape that emphasises motion, even when stationary. The contrast of the long, low-slung roofline, conjuring an image of a rakish shooting brake in silhouette, and elevated stance add to the visual impact.

     

    Above the base Q30 model, two grades – "Premium" and "Sport" – permit opportunities for further individual expression through exterior design.

     

    The Q30 Premium includes LED front fog lamps, body-colored and heated door mirrors, as well as chrome dual rectangular exhaust finishers. Eighteen-inch alloy wheels add to the Premium grade's striking appearance.

     

    The face of the Q30 Sport is slightly different, thanks to a shapely bespoke bumper and gloss black front grille. Custom body-colored sidesills give the car a striking, in-motion look, while a sporty rear bumper is joined by dark chrome dual rectangular exhaust finishers. Nineteen-inch alloy wheels complete the confident look of the Sport model.

     

    The Q30 Premium's elevated stance (170mm at the front axle) allows for a higher hip point (531mm), which aids ingress and egress. The A-pillar design is intentionally slim, contributing to enhanced visibility for a confident driving experience. Q30 Sport stands a little lower (155mm at front axle), providing for agile ride and handling.

     

    The Q30's coupe-like design belies its interior space and functionality. Cabin room is highly competitive, notably the boot capacity of 13 cubic-feet (368 liters VDA), which ranks among the best in the premium compact segment.

     

    "The Q30 is not the little brother or sister to siblings from larger segments. The car features a unique posture and shape that conveys the type of spontaneity and independent spirit that can only be matched by its owner."
    Alfonso Albaisa, Infiniti Executive Design Director

     

    Infiniti's bold approach to design continues inside the Q30, where buyers will find an expressive interior that challenges traditional standards of symmetry in automotive design.

     

    The beautifully styled, asymmetric surfaces feature wave shapes and dynamic lines that twist apart and flow away from the driver. This "dissymmetry" alters the conventional perception of occupant areas, creating a more pleasant environment in which to spend time.

     

    "Infiniti wants to offer an environment in which the driver stays connected to the driving experience and where passengers feel relaxed in an open, aesthetically pleasing space. All occupants will appreciate a high level of artistry in the flowing, asymmetric lines."
    Alfonso Albaisa, Infiniti Executive Design Director

     

    Custom-designed trims deliver a personalized, self-expressive interior design. "City Black" blends black upholstery with purple stitching, ideal for the all-night urbanite. "Cafe Teak" combines classy brown and black upholstery with black stitching, providing a modern twist on traditional concepts of premium. "Gallery White" endows Q30 with a fashionable, high-contrast appearance, featuring white leather with red accents. All three "designer" trims accentuate the Q30's stand-out interior and will add to the car's appeal for open-minded premium buyers looking for a new, creative approach to cabin design.

     

    Infiniti interior designers have also selected the highest quality materials and processes available to create a modern-looking and luxurious cabin. For example, a super-soft, highly tactile material lines high-impact areas of the interior, such as door trims and the center armrest, while "Dinamica®," a new Italian suede-like material used increased increasingly in the high-fashion industry, has been applied to the roof-line and pillars.

     

    Interior noise levels in Q30 add to the overall cabin comfort. Infiniti sound engineers used the official Articulation Index, a standard way of measuring the level of speech intelligibility provided in a space, to measure the quality of occupant conversation within the cabin. Q30 features a 10-percent improvement in audibility over the leading segment competition at a speed of 120kph.

     

    Quietness in the cabin is aided by Active Noise Cancellation, which emits sound waves from the four door speakers to negate any instances of booming noise emanating from the 2.2-liter diesel engine (Europe market only). Sound-damping materials further reduce the impact of unwanted noise, either from the engine or exterior elements, while the closed sections of the high-rigidity body structure protect the Q30 from any negative noise and vibration generated by broken or inconsistent road surfaces.

     

    Further interior comfort is guaranteed thanks to an advanced seat design. The seatback has been carefully engineered to match the curvature of the spine, providing consistent spinal support and minimising pressure on back muscles. A wider fitting shape on the seats distributes weight more evenly, while the softness of the seat cushion provides enhanced support and comfort. Internal testing by Infiniti engineers showed that the Q30 seat back section distributes load more effectively than its competitors in the segment.

     

    For drivers wanting to add to the dynamic feel inside the Q30, sports seats with integrated headrests are available for the first time in an Infiniti, featuring eight-way adjustment and power lumbar support. The Q30 Sport features a leather-wrapped, flat-bottomed steering wheel, as well as aluminium pedals and footrests, adding to the in-control driving experience.

     

    On certain grades, drivers can also stay in tune with the dynamic performance of the Q30 through Active Sound Enhancement, which monitors acceleration behaviour and gear ratio, smoothing out variations in engine tone to project a harmonious and exhilarating sound when accelerating.

     

    Confident dynamics deliver a holistic driving experience

     

    The Q30 active compact delivers a dynamic driving experience unique to Infiniti. Development started at the brand's technical center in Japan, before moving to Europe for final development and testing. In total, over 750 Infiniti engineers in Japan and Europe were involved in the car's development.

     

    "Each mechanical aspect has been tuned in unison to make the Q30 perform as one, delivering a holistic driving experience that is both involving and intuitive. As a result, high performance is deployed consistently."
    Grahame Cornforth, Infiniti Chief Vehicle Engineer

     

    The priority for Infiniti engineers was to strike an ideal balance between ride and handling. The car stays firm on the road thanks to specially tuned shock absorbers, with engineers considering over 50 variations on prototype vehicles before choosing the optimal setting, while the driving remains smooth throughout. Body stiffness has been enhanced to the benefit of the driver, eliminating negative sensations and audio cues, so the Q30 experience feels and sounds controlled.

     

    Infiniti engineers have designed the suspension to be both forgiving and comfortable, without sacrificing agility. Bump shock rates and shock absorber rebound rates have been specially tuned, while MacPherson front struts offer tight packaging to best handle Q30's size and weight. A multilink system at the rear offers precise wheel control in all any conditions.

     

    The Q30's steering has been tuned to deliver a consistent and connected feeling, thanks to an intuitive speed-sensitive system. A light and nimble feel makes the car easier to control in busy city traffic and urban environments, reducing stress and driver fatigue, while a gradual increase in resistance according to incremental changes in speed boosts driver confidence and control.

     

    "The Q30 offers excellent steering, further enhancing the overall ride and handling feel, as well as a tuned suspension and body response that's uniquely Infiniti. Thanks to this set-up, the car offers a firm and in-control driving sensation, a perfect example being Q30's ability to confidently steer the right cornering angle and 'hold the line' precisely though the corner."
    Grahame Cornforth, Infiniti Chief Vehicle Engineer

     

    Depending on the grade, Q30's suspension settings endow unique performance attributes. The base and Premium model are best suited to the varied, and often inconsistent road surfaces found in urban environments, the suspension set-up biased towards reducing vibration and harshness picked up from the road.

     

    The Q30 Sport – with 15mm lower ground clearance than the base and Premium versions – gives a firmer ride, facilitating tighter body control and reduced roll without compromising comfort. The Sport grade has been engineered to be used comfortably on a daily basis while offering an intuitive, in-control driving experience.

     

    A varied range of powertrain options is available globally, all tuned to provide exciting power delivery. In the European base model, there is a 1.6-liter engine, with either 120hp or 154hp. Also in Europe, diesel options include 1.5- and 2.2-liter engines, both four cylinder, with 107hp and 168hp power outputs, respectively.

     

    In addition to these powertrain options, and the only engine offered in the U.S., Premium and Sport models add a 2.0-liter, four-cylinder gasoline engine producing 208hp.

     

    Automatic gear shifts are smooth and seamless thanks to a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The dual clutch intelligently pre-selects gears so the next shift is always ready to go, while manual mode with paddle shifters lets the driver control gear changes when desired. Well-spaced ratios promise comfortable acceleration thanks to an even distribution of power, whether at a steady or fast pace, while quick and supple changes are ensured using either the fully automatic mode or the paddle gear selectors. Torque is almost uninterrupted between changes, reducing lurching while in motion and between shifts.

     

    A six-speed manual transmission will also be made available in Europe only.

     

    Power delivery from all engines is smooth while responsive as Infiniti's technical engineers have ensured the Q30's acceleration is prompt and reactive – providing bursts of power when most needed, giving confidence to the driver. An in-command sensation is generated by easily controlled acceleration, enabling the driver to feel and regulate the Q30's forward motion more intuitively.

     

    The Q30 features a host of intuitive technologies that enhance the driving experience, while providing maximum safety to all occupants. These include: Automatic Park Assist with Around View Monitor (AVM) and Moving Object Detection (MOD), making the Q30 one of the easiest cars to park in the premium compact segment; Blind Spot Warning, providing greater security and confidence at speed by warning of other vehicles out of the driver's line of sight; Forward Collision Warning with Forward Emergency Braking, reducing the stress of driving in heavy traffic or in the city; Auto High Beam Assist, a highly intuitive technology that improves safety and confidence during night-time driving; and Intelligent Cruise Control, maintaining a safe distance from the car in front, resulting in a safe and relaxing drive.

     

    A special metal plating method allows the radar waves of the Intelligent Cruise Control to pass through the Infiniti badge – a first for the brand.

     

    Infiniti's trademark InTouch infotainment system, first introduced on the pioneering Q50, has been evolved and upgraded for the Q30, delivering an intuitive, tablet-like experience from the driver's seat via a delivering touch-screen HMI (human machine interface).

     

    The Infiniti Q30 active compact will go on sale in selected markets later in 2015.

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      The leather used for the seats feel quite supple and help fix the issue of uncomfortable seats in the SRX. Interior space has grown, thanks to a two-inch increase in the wheelbase. Rear legroom has grown 3.2 inches and it allows anyone sitting back there to stretch out. Headroom is still slightly tight thanks in part to our tester coming with the optional panoramic sunroof. But this can be alleviated by recalling the rear seat slightly. Cargo space in smack dab in the middle - 30 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 63 cubic feet when folded.
      Cadillac User Interface (CUE) has been one of our least favorite infotainment systems to use since it was introduced a few years ago. The litany of problems ranging from a touch sensitive buttons not responding to inputs to the system crashing have dragged Cadillac down. But the system has been getting a number of changes and updates over the past few years. For starters, Cadillac has removed most of the touch-sensitive buttons from the system. Being able to press an actual button to turn on the heated/ventilated seats or adjust the temperature is really nice. It is a shame Cadillac didn’t bring back an actual volume knob for CUE - the touch-sensitive strip is still there. But at least there are volume controls on the steering wheel that allow you to avoid it. The system itself has been overhauled with a faster processor and a slightly improved interface. The changes make a difference as the system is snappier and a little bit easier to understand. If you still find CUE a bit overwhelming, you’ll be happy to know that CUE now features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration.
      Cadillac bucks the trend in the midsize luxury crossover class by only offering one engine - a 3.6L V6 producing 310 horsepower and 271 pound-feet of torque (@ 5,000 rpm). This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The V6 is the weak link in the XT5. When leaving a stop, it takes a moment for the engine to realize the accelerator pedal has been pressed before it starts working. This is even worse when you’re trying to make a pass as it seems the engine was busy taking a nap before it was hastily woken up. Once the engine is awake, it takes its time to get up to speed. There is a positive to the V6 engine and that is the stop-start system. Unlike some previous systems that are slow to restart the engine or do so in a very rough fashion, Cadillac’s system is quick and smooth when you let off the brake. The eight-speed automatic seems reluctant to downshift at times. We’re guessing this transmission was calibrated for fuel economy. At least the eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts.
      Fuel economy figures for the 2017 Cadillac XT5 all-wheel drive stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average fuel economy for the week landed around 22.3 mpg in mostly city driving. 
      One characteristic we liked about the SRX was its comfortable ride. Yes, it flies in the face of Cadillac’s message of beating the German’s at their own handling game. But buyers loved the smoothness on offer. Sadly, the XT5 loses a bit of the smoothness. Despite our tester featuring an adaptive suspension system, the XT5 wasn’t able to fully iron out bumps. Some of this can be attributed to 20-inch wheels fitted to our tester. At least the XT5 keeps road and wind noise out of the interior. Like the SRX, the XT5 isn’t sporty. Body motions are kept in check, but the light weight and nonexistent feel from the steering puts a halt to that idea. 
      An item Cadillac has been touting on the XT5 is the Rear Camera Mirror. Available only on the top-line Platinum, the mirror can stream the view from the rear camera by flicking a switch. We found this to be really helpful when backing out of parking lots as it gave a view that isn’t hindered by the thick rear pillars. Hopefully, Cadillac spreads this feature down to other trims of the XT5. 
      In some respects, the 2017 Cadillac XT5 is a step forward. The model improves on certain parts of the SRX such as a more luxurious and spacious interior, improved CUE system, and sharper looks. But in other respects, Cadillac messed up with the XT5. The 3.6L V6 needs to be shown the door and a new engine that offers better low-end performance to take its place. The loss of the smooth ride that the SRX was known for hurts the XT5 as well. Finally, there is the price. Our XT5 Platinum tester came with an as-tested price of $69,985. It is a nice crossover. But if we’re dropping close $70,000 on a luxury crossover, we can think of a few models that would be ahead of the XT5.
      It should be noted that the Cadillac XT5 has taken the place of the SRX of being the brand’s best selling model. At the end of 2016, Cadillac moved 39,485 XT5s. But unlike the SRX which we could recommend without hesitation, the XT5 comes with a number of caveats that we cannot do the same.
      Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XT5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Cadillac
      Model: SRX
      Trim: Platinum
      Engine: 3.6L V6 VVT DI
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700
      Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN
      Base Price: $62,500
      As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00
      20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00
      Trailering Equipment - $575.00
      Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00
      Compact Spare Tire - $350.00
      Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00
      Black Roof Rails - $295.00
      Black Splash Guards - $170.00
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00
    • By William Maley
      As Volvo finishes up the launch of their 90 series lineup, the company's focus will turn to the 40 series lineup. Speaking with Autocar, Volvo's R&D boss Henrik Green revealed the XC40 compact crossover will launch this fall. The model is expected to look somewhat similar to the Concept 40.1 shown last year and utilize the all new CMA platform that was jointly worked on by Volvo and their parent company, Geely. 
      Down the road, Volvo plans on launching other versions of the 40 Series such as a hatchback. 
      Also launching this year is the second-generation XC60. This is an important model for Volvo as it is their most popular model.
      “The XC60 is our biggest-volume car that sells broadly in Europe, China and America. It brings significant profits so is crucial in many aspects. [The new model is] a fantastic car, a big step forward,” said Green.
      Source: Autocar

      View full article
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