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  • Drew Dowdell
    Drew Dowdell

    Chevy Malibu to die after 2024

      ...Malibu follows the Fusion and 200 into that great junkyard in the sky....

    The Chevrolet Malibu will follow the likes to the Ford Fusion and Chrysler 200 by following them into that great nameplate junkyard in the sky after 2024 according to a report by Automotive News.  There is a possibility of an electric successor to the Malibu, but nothing is certain at this point.  An electric replacement would fit with GM's timeline to build 20 new EVs by 2023.   Before the ax falls in 2024, the Malibu could get one last face lift for the 2022 model year to help it through the final stages before retirement.  The Malibu is built in the Fairfax KS plant where the Cadillac XT4 is built.

    2019-Chevrolet-Malibu-006.jpg

    This follows on reports that the Chevrolet Camaro will also die in 2023.  Other cars that are up for the chopping block are the Sonic after 2020 and the Spark after 2021.  The Bolt and Equinox will get a freshening next year.  With the Impala, Cruze, and Volt already dead, these changes will leave the Chevy brand without any sedans after 2024. With the Buick Regal also possibly canceled once the contract with PSA runs out, it may be that the only sedans available from General Motors will be from Cadillac. 



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    19 minutes ago, Potluck said:

    Not everyone wants a crossover.  Lots of sedans are still sold... but now chevy won't be selling any of them. 

    We have no idea of what cars they will have in the EV role out. Very possible for the Malibu to come out as an EV.

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    I doubt they'd call it Malibu.  They're just as likely to turn it into some sort of crossover. They already make a wagon on this platform.  MaliCroz anyone?

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    4 minutes ago, Robert Hall said:

    I wonder if they will do a 60th anniversary edition in 2024.

    I'm sure they will.  Start saving up. 

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    On 7/29/2019 at 12:14 PM, Drew Dowdell said:

    by the time the SUV/CUV fad fades, the market will have shifted more to EVs and autonomous vehicles... and who know what those will look like. 

    Rolling toasters probably. 

    One reason my garage is full of woodworking equipment. The era of interesting affordable cars is coming to a close.

    10 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    I'm sure they will.  Start saving up. 

    I will be happy with a plastic model, thanks...

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    balthazar

    Posted (edited)

    7 hours ago, Frisky Dingo said:

    The BMW 3GT and 5GT would beg to differ.

    Those are just misshapen sedans, more obvious since they co-exist with sedans. A brand needs to do a true amalgamation of a sedan & CUV, the best attributes of each, and kill off the 'root vehicles' upon introduction; force the new metric. No one has tried that yet.

    Edited by balthazar

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    On July 29, 2019 at 11:54 AM, Robert Hall said:

     I don't see the Japanese and Korean companies getting out of the sedan market.  When the CUV/SUV fad fades, the Detroit 3 are going to be hurting due their usual short-sighted thinking...

    If any 'fad' is fading, it's sedans, not CUVs.

    Accord peaked in the USDM in 2001, moving 415K units. As recently as 2014 it was still 388K. 
    2019 is on pace to sell 260K.

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    1) 260k cars is still 260k cars - a lot - a lot more than Chevrolet sells of most of their SUVs.

    2) Cost of development is marginal. Modern crossover SUVs are based on a sister car platform. The big winners will be the ones able to leverage both products off of a single platform of shared costs. 

    3) GMs sedans have been neglected and not class leading in some time. They're also priced way too high. 

    4) EVs aren't for everyone. Very myopic when you live and commute in a single urban environment but highly impractical for those who have longer commutes or travel a lot. Fast charge batteries haven't been proven out in severe conditions or duty either - so don't tell me those are just on the horizon.  EVs also have a high environmental cost. 

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    6 minutes ago, texas99alpha said:

    1) 260k cars is still 260k cars - a lot - a lot more than Chevrolet sells of most of their SUVs.

    2) Cost of development is marginal. Modern crossover SUVs are based on a sister car platform. The big winners will be the ones able to leverage both products off of a single platform of shared costs. 

    3) GMs sedans have been neglected and not class leading in some time. They're also priced way too high. 

    4) EVs aren't for everyone. Very myopic when you live and commute in a single urban environment but highly impractical for those who have longer commutes or travel a lot. Fast charge batteries haven't been proven out in severe conditions or duty either - so don't tell me those are just on the horizon.  EVs also have a high environmental cost. 

    1-3: totally true.  Imagine if all GM sedans were priced about $5000 less than current MSRP.  GM could undercut Hyundai/KIA in ten minutes.

    4: EVs may not be mainstream YET, but ask me again in 2030 when they are truly ready for prime time.

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    The trend of only pursuing the most profitable projects (by today's measure) to please wall st is a little rearward looking. Margins on those projects may be eroded once your purchasing power has declined due to the fact that you cut a bunch of other volume projects with lower margins. A very poor and short term way of looking at the business. GM share will continue to decline, but so will their scale and purchasing power. Margins on their formerly high margin products will be pressured. New buyers won't be coming into the fold because you offer nothing to "start" selling them on. Ride sharing services? That's the answer? Again, a myopic view that works in a highly urbanized environment, but not for "middle america". What I see is a strategy that's not very comprehensive and has a lot of holes that will threaten their future capital programs. 

    Edited by texas99alpha
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