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  • Drew Dowdell
    Drew Dowdell

    Ask Me Anything: 2020 Hyundai Palisade AWD

      ...my that's a big ship...

    IMG_20191127_140956.jpgIn the C&G garage for the week is the 2020 Hyundai Palisade Limited AWD with a sticker price of $47,605. This is Hyundai's newest SUV, at least until the diminutive Hyundai Venue takes its place at the other end of the size spectrum.  The first impression I got from the Palisade was how big it is.  Even though it is around 7 inches shorter than a Buick Enclave, it looks bigger and beefier. Being a Limited means that it is in top trim with only carpeted floor mats as an additional option.  It's powered by a 3.8 liter naturally aspirated V6 producing 291 HP and 262 lb-ft of torque and equipped with start/stop.  On my quick initial test drive I found the start/stop function to be unobtrusive and quick to restart the vehicle when I was ready to roll.  Another immediate impression was with the sound quality of the Harmon Kardon sound system. I hooked my phone up via USB and Android Auto took over, playing my favorite Pandora station loud and clear. 

    Another feature I like is the video display in the dash when using the turn signal. It helps clear any blind spots one might have in this big SUV. 

    So while you're stuffing your faces with turkey this Thursday, think of questions you have about the 2020 Hyundai Palisade and post them below.

    2020 Hyundai Palisade qqmonroney[9116].jpg



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    I was just out in it for 45 minutes. I could really see myself living with one on a daily basis since I'm shopping in this size class anyway once I find a new job.

    BTW, here's a close-up of the center console and the gear selector.

    IMG_20191202_143100.jpg

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    2 hours ago, ccap41 said:

    If I'm driving in a straight line and my car is going off with alerts every time somebody passes me or I pass somebody on the interstate, I'm turning that crap off. That sounds annoying. 

    I'm perfectly okay with the little amber light in the corner of a side mirror as I'm turning my head anyway. 

    It's not going off...it lights up if someone is there, and if you still signal (i.e. you're signalling but there's not space to change lanes safely), it chimes.

    A tiny amber light you can barely see unless staring at the tiny corner of a mirror does nothing, and avoids the point of what blind spot is meant for.

    44 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    I was just out in it for 45 minutes. I could really see myself living with one on a daily basis since I'm shopping in this size class anyway once I find a new job.

    BTW, here's a close-up of the center console and the gear selector.

    IMG_20191202_143100.jpg

    Great shot. Buttons...are GREAT. As anyone who's gotten used to a "it's somewhere in the touchscreen..." car lately, buttons remain underrated.

    Nice shot. How's the current Hyundai H-Trac system in snow or road going?

    Front to back, side to side, or anything?

    2 hours ago, surreal1272 said:

    Drew sat in and drove one yet doesn’t share the same gripes as certain folks here. Three other reviews by major publications echo the same sentiments as Drew. Interesting. 
     

    Confirmation is bias is, indeed, a real thing. 

    Right? Who knew...;)

    Competition and choices are GREAT things. Nice move, Hyundai Kia.

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    3 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    I was just out in it for 45 minutes. I could really see myself living with one on a daily basis since I'm shopping in this size class anyway once I find a new job.

    BTW, here's a close-up of the center console and the gear selector.

    IMG_20191202_143100.jpg

    Man that display screen has seen better days. You use steel wool pads on it? 😁

    Yeah, just not a fan of the rotary or button shifters as stated before, too artificial and now you have to worry about the shift solenoid or actuator going out at the transmission or slopping a sugary drink or even water in the buttons if you have to slam on the brakes, second one most likely not covered by the long warranty. Some things to consider in a daily driver.       

    I realize that other manf's. do it as well and it's to save space in the console, but it's just another electronic moving part that will inevitably go bad at both ends.

    Long live the column shifter! 😎

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    3 hours ago, caddycruiser said:

    Until you've actually experienced a real blind spot system, you wouldn't understand.

    A tiny, barely visible light amber colored spec that blends in and you have to stare at the far corner of the mirror to see it, then does no other alert, avoids the purpose.

    Driving requires mirrors. But blind spots happen and an actually visible/audible alert helps, without making a sound unless you're doing something you shouldn't be. Was a top complaint from our 2016 Traverse for years, and rentals I've driven from some brands.

     

    1 minute ago, caddycruiser said:

    It's not going off...it lights up if someone is there, and if you still signal (i.e. you're signalling but there's not space to change lanes safely), it chimes.

    A tiny amber light you can barely see unless staring at the tiny corner of a mirror does nothing, and avoids the point of what blind spot is meant for.

     So I went and tested this out for you.  With the blind spot monitoring system, you get an amber light in the mirror and also in the heads up display telling you someone is in your blind spot.  If you signal that direction, you get a chime and the steering wheel buzzes.  Plus you also get the video of that area in the dash.  

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    Just now, Drew Dowdell said:

     

     So I went and tested this out for you.  With the blind spot monitoring system, you get an amber light in the mirror and also in the heads up display telling you someone is in your blind spot.  If you signal that direction, you get a chime and the steering wheel buzzes.  Plus you also get the video of that area in the dash.  

    Works as it should. Perfectly. Thanks!

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    14 minutes ago, caddycruiser said:

    It's not going off...it lights up if someone is there, and if you still signal (i.e. you're signalling but there's not space to change lanes safely), it chimes.

    A tiny amber light you can barely see unless staring at the tiny corner of a mirror does nothing, and avoids the point of what blind spot is meant for.

    That's acceptable to me. 

    I definitely do disagree that the amber light does nothing. Unless you have poor vision, it isn't difficult to see the only light on a mirror in which you're already looking at before changing lanes. 

    12 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    So I went and tested this out for you.  With the blind spot monitoring system, you get an amber light in the mirror and also in the heads up display telling you someone is in your blind spot.  If you signal that direction, you get a chime and the steering wheel buzzes.  Plus you also get the video of that area in the dash.  

    I like that. It isn't intrusive in any way unless you're about to make a move in that direction in which it makes sure you are aware. 

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    13 minutes ago, USA-1 said:

    Man that display screen has seen better days. You use steel wool pads on it? 😁

    Yeah, just not a fan of the rotary or button shifters as stated before, too artificial and now you have to worry about the shift solenoid or actuator going out at the transmission or slopping a sugary drink or even water in the buttons if you have to slam on the brakes, second one most likely not covered by the long warranty. Some things to consider in a daily driver.       

    I realize that other manf's. do it as well and it's to save space in the console, but it's just another electronic moving part that will inevitably go bad at both ends.

    Long live the column shifter! 😎

    Transmissions have been electronically actuated for more than a decade now.... even if they have a column or floor mount shifter. 

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    1 minute ago, frogger said:

    The light in my SO's car is pretty easily noticeable in peripheral vision.

    image.png.4c04a0a1c7158c2f0df608fcee37255b.png

    That's a good, and large, light on the side there.  Most of them are just little icons in the mirror. 

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    1 minute ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Transmissions have been electronically actuated for more than a decade now.... even if they have a column or floor mount shifter. 

    Right, all transmissions have been electronically controlled for over three decades, but not all have shift solenoids or "shift by wire" like this.  

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    1 hour ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    That's a good, and large, light on the side there.  Most of them are just little icons in the mirror. 

    This is the one addendum...Subaru, and a few other brands, who (though they still should be audible) actually keep it large & visible almost inside.

    I'm used to these now after 24k miles of driving...but still unsure why it is the one and only feature that has NO audible anything, regardless of what's happening. Everything else beeps...except blind spot.

    For blind spot to be most effective, it being mounted INSIDE, a-la Subaru, Audi, Infiniti/Nissan, Acura, etc. is best of all...but add a BEEP too.

    Hyundai Kia's sounds spot on, even being mirror based. Good move.

    Edited by caddycruiser

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    How's the HTRAC AWD in snow, normal driving, etc? Does it front back, side to side or?

     

     

    Edited by caddycruiser
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    12 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    What "rotary"?   The Rotary dial is not the shifter, it's the drive mode selector.  Set it to comfort or snow, but otherwise leave it alone. 

    What's even funnier is... I've driven one and I forgot this.  Sold unit.

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    So bottom line, how you personally ranking it against other crossovers in this segment?

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    37 minutes ago, ykX said:

    So bottom line, how you personally ranking it against other crossovers in this segment?

    One of the best. 

    Less road noise and better ride than the Pilot.
    Nicer interior than Enclave or Traverse. 
    Bigger and more up to date than the Durango.
    Highlander is new and I haven't driven the new one yet.
     

    The one downside I've found to this one is fuel economy. In my mostly suburban driving I'm getting in the high teens and I'm pretty gentle on the throttle. It doesn't have the trick cylinder shutoff that the GM twins and Pilot have. 

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    4 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    One of the best. 

    Less road noise and better ride than the Pilot.
    Nicer interior than Enclave or Traverse. 
    Bigger and more up to date than the Durango.
    Highlander is new and I haven't driven the new one yet.
     

    The one downside I've found to this one is fuel economy. In my mostly suburban driving I'm getting in the high teens and I'm pretty gentle on the throttle. It doesn't have the trick cylinder shutoff that the GM twins and Pilot have. 

    Does the back open up wide to allow large stuff to be put in with the rear seats down?

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    1 minute ago, dfelt said:

    Does the back open up wide to allow large stuff to be put in with the rear seats down?

    Yup, up and out of the way. Lift height is programmable too.

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    4 hours ago, dfelt said:

    Does the back open up wide to allow large stuff to be put in with the rear seats down?

    Now we know where dfelt's wife puts him in the Escalade when they go for a Sunday drive.

    9 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Nicer interior than Enclave or Traverse.

    Wow.  Ruhlly?

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