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    2014 Review Wrap-Up: Sports Stuff


    • Doing Sport Three Different Ways; the Mazda MX-5 Miata, Ram 1500 R/T, and Lexus LS 460 F-Sport


    Next up in the 2014 review wrap-up is sporty cars. Originally I was going to call this sports cars, but only one can be considered it. The other two happen to be sporty takes on standard models.

    First: Mazda MX-5 Miata Grand Touring PHRT

    For an automobile to remain true to its mission for a quarter-of-a-century is an amazing feat. Such is the case for the Mazda MX-5 Miata. When it first was shown back in 1989, it promised to bring fun and sporty driving that roadsters from the fifties and sixties, but with better reliability. Throughout its three generations, the MX-5 Miata has achieved this, along with a loyal and rabid fan base. With a new MX-5 Miata coming over the horizon, I wanted to give the third-generation model a final spin. Well a 2015 MX-5 Miata Grand Touring PHRT arrived for a week to do just that.

    Mazda decided to stick with the shape from the first-generation MX-5 Miata and make evolutionary changes to it. I think this is a wise decision as you can tell there is a direct lineage from first model to the current one. The front end has a rounded shape and the smiling grille that has been a key part of Mazda’s last-generation designs. There is also a lip spoiler which comes as part of the Grand Touring trim level. Along the side are some the largest wheel flares I have ever come across on a vehicle. Its a nice touch as it makes the Miata that much more distinctive.

    2014 Mazda MX 5 Miata Grand Touring 4

    Now the third-generation Miata is special because it introduced a power hardtop. The hardtop gives the Miata a coupe look when it is up and provides extra sound deadening. Putting the hardtop up or down only takes around ten seconds. One note, the hardtop when folded does take up a majority of trunk space. So pack really lightly if you decide to take a trip in one.

    Getting inside the Miata is a bit of an acrobatic act as the way you have enter involves folding your legs and then lowering yourself into the seat. Once you are settled in, you feel that you have become one with the vehicle thanks to the low seating position which means all controls are in easy reach. The leather bucket seats provide a multitude of adjustments so you can your find your perfect spot. The dash is nothing fancy with black plastics and aluminum trim which helps reduce distraction while driving. Standard on the Grand Touring is a Bose sound system. The system sounds great when you are puttering along in the city or along a back road. But if you decide to hit the freeway, the sound system has it work cut out as it has to try to drown out an abundance of road noise.

    Power comes from a 2.0L MZR four-cylinder paired with the optional six-speed automatic. This combination produces 158 horsepower and 140 pound-feet of torque. Go for the six-speed manual on the Grand Touring and it nets you an additional nine horsepower. Those numbers are somewhat worrisome when you also take into account a curb weight of 2,619 pounds for the power hardtop model. But once you slip behind the wheel and get moving, those thoughts of being underpowered wash away. The engine has to be worked to use all that power, but Mazda made sure that you enjoyed doing it by making the engine pop and rev freely, giving you the thoughts of driving a sixties roadster.. The six-speed automatic was very smooth and provided crisp shifts. Fuel economy is rated at 21 City/28 Highway/23 Combined. My week saw an average of 25.1 MPG.

    2014 Mazda MX 5 Miata Grand Touring 13

    Of course the real story of any Miata is its handling. I heard all of the superlatives and cheers about the MX-5 Miata’s handling, and I have to say those claims are very much true. The Miata is a joy around curves as the suspension keeps the vehicle steady and makes sure no body roll makes an entrance. Steering was excellent thanks to the right amount weight and feel. This is a vehicle that wants to be pushed and it rewards you when you decide to. When you decide to drive the Miata on a daily basis, the ride does let in a few bumps.

    After spending a week with the MX-5 Miata, I was sad to see it go. Mazda has been able to keep the spirit of the original Miata with the third-generation model. With excellent handing characteristics, the addition of a power hardtop, and a design all its own, it shows why the Miata has been able to last as long as it has.

    Disclaimer: Mazda Provided the MX-5 Miata, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2014

    Make: Mazda

    Model: MX-5 Miata

    Trim: Grand Touring PHRT

    Engine: 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve VVT Four-Cylinder

    Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive

    Horsepower @ RPM: 158 @ 6700

    Torque @ RPM: 140 @ 5000

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/28/23

    Curb Weight: 2,619 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan

    Base Price: $30,550

    As Tested Price: $32,735 (Includes $795.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Premium Package - $1,390

    Next: Ram 1500 R/T


    The past ten to twenty years in the pickup truck market has seen an explosion in trims and model variations. You can get a standard work truck with the vinyl seats or go all the way for a luxury model with such amenities as heated and cool seats, and dual-zone climate control. But one area in the marketplace that has been neglected for sometime is the sports truck. Models such as the Chevrolet 454SS, Ford Lightning, and Dodge Ram SRT-10 really don’t exist anymore. But Ram wants to let you know that sport truck is still a thing and it comes in the form of 1500 R/T Regular Cab.

    2014 Ram 1500 RT Regular Cab 7

    Ram has got the basics down on the 1500 R/T. The R/T comes when you order the Sport trim level with the standard cab and 6’4” bed. Exterior changes include a blacked-out mesh grille, a new hood with faux air vents, twenty-two inch chrome wheels, and dual exhaust pars. Donning a red paint job, the R/T gives the Ram 1500 a mean look. Inside are a set of bucket seats wrapped in cloth and leather, and dash layout familiar to anyone who has been in a recent Chrysler product. This means an eight-inch screen for the UConnect infotainment system and a compressive gauge package. Getting in truck was a little bit of a hassle as its quite leap to get in. A set of step bars would be nice feature for this truck. But once inside, it was easy to get settled and understand where everything was.

    Power for the R/T is the 5.7L HEMI V8 with 395 horsepower and 410 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired up with an eight-speed automatic. Despite a curb weight of 5,106 pounds, this powertrain is able to get the Ram 1500 moving at a rapid rate. 0-60 will take you around the mid-5 second area. The eight-speed automatic provides lightning fast shifts and keeps the truck in the zone of power. I should also mention the noise of HEMI makes you want to push the go pedal that little more to enjoy the sweet sounds. Don’t expect to win any fuel economy awards though. The 1500 R/T is rated at 15 City/22 Highway/17 Combined. I got 18 MPG during my week.

    2014 Ram 1500 RT Regular Cab 10

    As for the ride, the Ram 1500 R/T has to be one of the smoothest rides I have ever experienced in a truck. Thanks a to multi-link, coil spring setup in the rear, bumps and imperfections were mostly ironed out. Even when the Ram was called in to haul a freezer and a wood lathe, the suspension was able to keep the truck level and provide a comfortable ride. Don’t expect the R/T to be a handling champ. Ram didn’t lower the suspension, which means you’ll have a bit of body roll. Also the steering is a bit slow and somewhat light in feel. But for many buyers, this isn’t a big deal.

    While the marketplace for sport trucks has dwindled a bit, the 2014 Ram 1500 R/T shows that you can still make a decent case for having a fun truck that can still do its fair share of work. Now if we could only convince them about stuffing the 6.4L HEMI into it…

    Disclaimer: Ram Provided the 1500 R/T, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2014

    Make: Ram

    Model: 1500

    Trim: R/T

    Engine: 5.7 HEMI V8

    Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive

    Horsepower @ RPM: 395 @ 5,600

    Torque @ RPM: 410 @ 3,950

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 15/22/14

    Curb Weight: 5,106 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Saltillo, Mexico

    Base Price: $35,105

    As Tested Price: $38,595 (Includes $1,195 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Uconnect 8.4N AM/FM/BT/ACCESS/NAV - $500.00

    Convenience Group - $495.00

    Spray-In Bedliner - $475.00

    Remote Start and Security Group - $350.00

    Class IV Receiver Hitch - $335.00

    Rear Sliding Windows - $140.00

    Next: Lexus LS 460 F-Sport


    Most of the luxury manufacturers have a high-performance model of their flagship sedan to entice those who want a bit of sport along with the amenities of a flagship. Mercedes-Benz is the best known with their S-Class AMG models, followed by the Audi S8 and Jaguar XJR. The latest one to join the fun is Lexus with the LS 460 F-Sport. Is it possible for a company known for producing some of the softest and most comfortable vehicles to embrace the sporty side?

    The LS hasn’t changed much since we last looked at it in our review of the 600h L last year. What has changed is what the F-Sport package adds. Up front, the spindle grille gets a new mesh insert and larger air intakes. A set of nineteen-inch multi-spoke wheels hide a set of large, Brembo brakes. Around back is a new bumper with chrome exhaust ports. These changes do give the LS a sporty outlook. Although, I not sure if red suits LS as it makes it look a bit gangly. White or black suits it much better.

    2014 Lexus LS 460 F Sport 11

    Inside is the same as the exterior. The only real changes of note are new brushed aluminum trim pieces, F-Sport embossed seats, and aluminum pedals. The LS is nice place to sit in and the controls are in easy reach. But I think its aging quite fast, especially when you compare it to like of the Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG. Not helping matters is the Remote Touch interface which is slow to react and quite jumpy when moving around.

    Under the hood, you’ll find a 4.6L V8 with 386 horsepower and 367 pound-feet. Opt for the all-wheel drive model and those numbers drop to 360 and 347 respectively. Whichever way you decide to have your power sent to wheels, an eight-speed automatic is standard. Acceleration is very strong and power comes on very smoothly. However if you were expecting some theatrics from the V8 with loud noises, prepare to disappointed. The only real noticeable change from the standard LS to the F-Sport is new piping to channel some of the engine noise inside. The eight-speed automatic is barely noticeable when it shifts. On the fuel economy front, the LS 460 F-Sport RWD is rated at 16 City/24 Highway/19 Combined. I saw 18.6 MPG during my week.

    2014 Lexus LS 460 F Sport 6

    Now the big changes the F-Sport brings to the LS deals with the suspension. The air suspension has been lowered by 20 millimeters and has been tuned for more sporty driving. Other changes include low-profile summer tires and a limited-slip differential. I can say there is a difference when you have the LS in the Sport or Sport+ setting when compared to the LS in normal. The suspension stiffens up a bit and keeps the vehicle stable when you decide to have a bit fun in the curves. However, the steering doesn’t have the weight or feel that is needed for a sporting sedan. It veers more to the light and numbness most owners of the LS are used to. As for day to day duties, the LS 460 F-Sport handles that about as well as a standard LS with a quiet and smooth ride.

    So the LS 460 F-Sport has shown that Lexus is capable of building sporty flagship up to a point. If they can work on the steering, they might have a real contender on their hands. Maybe that’s for the next-generation model.

    Disclaimer: Lexus Provided the LS 460 F-Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2014

    Make: Lexus

    Model: LS

    Trim: 460

    Engine: 4.6L DOHC 32-valve VVT-iE V8

    Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive

    Horsepower @ RPM: 386 @ 6,400

    Torque @ RPM: 367 @ 4,100

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/24/19

    Curb Weight: 4,365 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Tahara, Aichi, Japan

    Base Price: $72,140

    As Tested Price: $88,080 (Includes $910.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    F-Sport Package - $8,350.00

    F-Sport Comfort Package - $1,650.00

    Mark Levinson 19-Speaker Audio System - $1,580.00

    Pre-Collision System - $1,500.00

    LED Headlamps - $1,450.00

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    The new Miata looks like a lot of fun to drive. I know the older Miata was a joy too, absolutely beautiful cars with amazing handling for both Sunday driving and for track days.

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    Nice Articles. I like the way you cover the history of the model, the specs and features and then finish with your opinons of the car.

    My favourite would have to be the Miata. Looks like a fun little car that will pack quite a punch!

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    For me, the miata has always seemed somewhat feminine. I think it's just how small the cab is, maybe. I'm a big fan of Lexus, though. The sporty exterior and elegant interior make for a great car to show off.

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    I think that the Miata would be a pretty good car to drive around sports-wise. I like the way that you layed the structure of the article out. Very detailed.

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      Make: Volkswagen
      Model: Golf
      Trim: Wolfsburg Edition
      Engine: 1.8L TSI Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 170 @ 4,500
      Torque @ RPM: 199 @ 1,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 25/35/29
      Curb Weight: 3,023 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Wolfsburg, Germany
      Base Price: $22,695
      As Tested Price: $23,515 (Includes $820.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A
    • By dfelt
      G. David Felt - Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.cheersandgears.com
      Rotary Powered Hybrid from Mazda?

      According to Autoblog web site, Mazda has filed new patents that would use a single piston rotary generator to power an electric fwd hybrid auto. Mazda first brought this idea up in 2015 when they showed off their Mazda2 RE Range-Extender auto. This was powered by a 330CC rotary generator. This auto was patented but seemed to just go quiet. Two years later, Mazda has updated their patents and now seems to want to push this out globally on their product line.
      The design of this auto's hybrid system seems to mirror the BMW i3 range extended auto. Thanks to the small size of the Rotary motor, this allows expanded space for a battery pack. Per the story, the rotary's strength is how small, quiet and smooth this engine runs which is a big benefit over small piston engines. They also state how they will close the intake port so there is no fuel or exhaust leaks leading to better fuel economy and emissions which is two known weaknesses of rotary engines.

      Over all, the patent filings and updates would imply the roomy benefits of an EV but with the range benefits of the Volt. Instant torque for quick Zoom Zoom driving in a quiet package that will challange them all.
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