• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    Quick Drive: 2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbodiesel


    • A Challenger To The Volkswagen Jetta TDI Appears!

    For the longest time, the Volkswagen Jetta has had it all to itself. I’m of course talking about the diesel compact sedan marketplace. Since the first Jetta came over the to the U.S. in the eighties, Volkswagen has offered a diesel engine as an option. Within the past few years, the popularity of the Jetta diesel has skyrocketed. But this past year, another contender has come in to challenge the Jetta’s dominance in this small niche. That would be the Chevrolet Cruze Turbodiesel. How does it stand up to the Jetta?

    Much like the Jetta TDI, the Chevrolet Cruze Turbodiesel doesn’t scream out that it's a diesel at all. The only clues that reveals its true identity are a set of seventeen-inch aluminum wheels and a new Eco badge that says 2.0 TD. Inside, the Cruze Turbodiesel comes fully loaded with leather seats, steering wheel controls, six-way power adjustment for the driver’s seat, remote start, and much more. To get even close to that in a Jetta, you’ll have to go for one of the higher trims. One disappointment I had with the Cruze’s interior were the seats. I found myself squirming around in them to make myself comfortable. Also compared to the the Jetta TDI, the Cruze’s back seat doesn’t provide enough legroom.

    Powering the Cruze Turbodiesel is a turbocharged 2.0L DOHC diesel four-cylinder with 151 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic is your only transmission choice. The Turbodiesel is quite the performer as torque peaks at 2,600 rpm and a majority of the torque is available between 1,750 and 3,000 rpm. This means the Cruze can very much hold its own when leaving a stop and there is always power in reserve when you need it. Fuel economy isn’t bad either with EPA ratings 27 City/46 Highway/33 Combined. Compared to the Jetta TDI economy, the Cruze beats it on the highway by four MPG, but the Jetta gets 30 MPG in the city. My average for the week landed around 37 MPG.

    However, all is not perfect with the 2.0L diesel. For starters, the 2.0L diesel engine sounds like it is from the eighties to early nineties with a loud clattering noise coming under the hood. Diesel engine technology has gotten much better to where the clattering noises are toned down by a fair amount, but you wouldn’t know it by standing next to the Cruze. Now I should at this point that when you’re inside the Cruze Turbodiesel, almost none of the clattering makes it in. This is a testament to noise reduction work done on the Cruze’s interior. It’s a shame that it wasn’t extended to the engine bay.

    2014 Chevrolet Cruze Turbodiesel 14

    The other problem with the Cruze Turbodiesel’s powertrain is the automatic. There are times when it seems to know what its doing and there are other times where it holds onto gears far too long before upshifting. I don’t know if this is an issue with this particular car or Turbodiesel models in general, but it wasn’t pleasant.

    Ride and handling characteristics are still the same as the Cruze I drove back two years ago where it has big car characteristics of smoothing over road imperfections and not letting in road and wind noise. As for cornering, the suspension keeps the vehicle steady and steering is quick, though somewhat numb.

    At the end of the week, I found the Cruze Turbodiesel to be equal to the Jetta TDI. Both models have different strengths and weaknesses, so trying to pick one that is better than the other is difficult. I would say if you’re looking for power and a impressive amount of kit, then look at the Cruze. If you want space, powertrain refinement, and a lower price, then the Jetta TDI is for you.

    Disclaimer: Chevrolet Provided the Cruze Turbodiesel, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2014

    Make: Chevrolet

    Model: Cruze

    Trim: Turbodiesel

    Engine: Turbocharged 2.0L DOHC Diesel Four-Cylinder

    Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic

    Horsepower @ RPM: 151 @ 4000

    Torque @ RPM: 264 @ 2600

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 27/46/33

    Curb Weight: 3,475 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Lordstown, Ohio

    Base Price: $24,885.00

    As Tested Price: $28,105.00 (Includes $810.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Audio System W/ Navigation - $795.00

    Enhanced Safety Package - $790.00

    Pioneer Sound System- $445.00

    2LT Driver Convenience Package - $380.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    nice write, but I disagree that the Cruze diesel is 'clattering', when i test drove it, it did not seem obnoxious. Or not really all that different from a VW. I did find it to be tomb quiet inside and I never really find the noise outside the cabin to be a big deal. As far as the tranny, there were times it didn't seem to know what to do, but I've always disliked the VW diesel with automatic.......moreso with the dual clutch especially.

    http://www.cheersandgears.com/topic/81799-2014-chevy-cruze-diesel/

    For me, the only way the VW has an edge is city FE and rear seat room. More or less it's probably a draw, like you infer. I'd rather have a GM than a VW. Your chances are tougher in a VW I feel.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    The other problem with the Cruze Turbodiesel’s powertrain is the automatic. There are times when it seems to know what its doing and there are other times where it holds onto gears far too long before upshifting. I don’t know if this is an issue with this particular car or Turbodiesel models in general, but it wasn’t pleasant.

    I have a little over 1000 miles on my Cruze diesel now. My initial test drives of a different car plus the exact one I bought fell in line with what I had read about the transmission shifting being odd. The strange thing is, once I actually picked my car up and started driving it, it has exhibited little of that past odd behavior. I'm not sure if they have a new transmission calibration that was flashed in it between when I test drove it and when picked it up or what changed. I also wonder if it doesn't have adaptive shift logic and having so many different drivers in the press cars causes problems. All in all, the transmission isn't really something I would complain about.

    I have put two tanks of diesel in mine so far with both averaging right around 35 mph calculated. This is actually better than the vehicle information center in the cluster stated. Also, at least 75% of my driving has been on surface streets so I'm pretty happy with the mileage so far (especially considering my heavy right foot) and it should only get better as it breaks in and the weather warms up.

    nice write, but I disagree that the Cruze diesel is 'clattering', when i test drove it, it did not seem obnoxious. Or not really all that different from a VW. I did find it to be tomb quiet inside and I never really find the noise outside the cabin to be a big deal. As far as the tranny, there were times it didn't seem to know what to do, but I've always disliked the VW diesel with automatic.......moreso with the dual clutch especially.

    Mine clatters quite a bit on a cold start but once it warms up it is much quieter. As stated in the review, even on the cold start, not much of it makes it into the cabin. Once it is warm, you wouldn't know it is a diesel sitting in the cabin.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Look at the pictures and remember that it was obviously quite cold when he had this car. diesels usually clatter more when cold

    Fuel economy tends to take a huge nosedive in such cold weather as well...

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    my last VW diesel drive (Jetta) was in winter so that may have jaded me some but the Passat TDI I drove previously didn't overwhelm me. I really don't think the VW is any more refined than the Cruze.

    "No indication to the masses that this car is a diesel in ride and drive or noises. Almost completely devoid of diesel personality. The only diesel rattle you hear is outside the car and even then it just isn't a fully committed rattler."

    that was just my take when i drove it. The inside was a tomb. All the sound deadening paid off but the Cruze diesel's one achilles to me is its weight. If they can trim 300 pounds off the Cruze diesel next go round, that'd be cool. It's hard to tout the Cruze's diesel achievements when its 3500 pounds plus and the Cruze Eco manual is like 500 pounds less. All that weight really has an effect on ride and drive and steering and suspension I figure. That's why for many, I think the Eco manual is almost a diesel killer in the Cruze lineup. Real world mpg's in combined driving can't be far apart and purchase price is so much less. Diesel prices are so volatile.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Yes, Cruze Eco manual is really the deal killer for the Cruze diesel. People are getting 44-45 mpg quite often.

    The average fuel economy for the Eco and Diesel are 35 and 36.5 mpg, respectively. That 1.5 mpg delta with a ~$0.60 price differential in fuel prices is really hard to overcome. And we are not even taking into consideration the price differential between the two models.

    As much as I love diesels, if I were in market for Cruze I would buy an ECO.

    Cruze Diesel really needs a manual transmission. Another blunder from GM.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    What a ridiculous statement to say that the diesel engine sound at idle is not awesome. I love the sound of my VW diesel, standing outside of it, listening to it clatter away, be it winter, spring, summer or fall.

    A little bit of warm weather and my mileage is shooting up significantly. Very nice.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I would have to say my cruze diesel has been great so far! Only 1400 KM on it but its roomy enough and gets amazing mileage.. even when it was -20C at the beginning of March. The Clatter? What clatter.. I can't hear it idiling next to my Cummins!

    1

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    GM absolutely needs to advertise this thing! I don't know why they have not done a better job. It's almost old GM like in that they release a new product but don't bother to tell anybody about it. I guess they just hope the car mags will do the trick for them. The problem is, its not really an enthusiasts car and enthusiasts tend to be the ones that read the car magazines. It seems like every person I tell that I bought a Cruze diesel always replies "Oh, I didn't know there was a diesel Cruze."

    As far as value goes, I've assumed all along that for the 2 - 3 years I will own the car, I will not save enough money on fuel to justify the purchase. Since diesels typically have better residual values, I am hoping I get more of my money back when it comes time to sell. Of course, if they don't ever let people know they make it, there may not be many people looking for a used one in a few years.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Probably would be a great car for you if you could find a slightly pre-owned one. You keep your cars forever and with a diesel, you'd be looking at a good level of reliability for an extended amount of miles.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    $25-28k for a Cruze seems like a lot to me. If it were a Verano or Malibu diesel for $28k, I think it would be a better deal. That being said, I think they should put the diesel in more vehicles, and perhaps some powertrain and transmission refinement needs done also. Should they get an 8 or 9 speed transmission for front wheel drive cars, that might solve some issues and add to the mileage.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Probably would be a great car for you if you could find a slightly pre-owned one. You keep your cars forever and with a diesel, you'd be looking at a good level of reliability for an extended amount of miles.

    all the unsold ones will become demos or will get titled and driven a couple k miles and put back on the lot as used....... once the 15's come out you will see a flood of used 14's. There's actually already quite a few used Cruze diesels across the USA on autotrader. No real price advantages yet tho.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. gmfannyc
      gmfannyc
      (34 years old)
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Another piece of the 2017 Chevrolet Cruze Diesel puzzle has been revealed. The official EPA numbers have been released and they are quite impressive. 
      Six-Speed Manual: 30 City/52 Highway/37 Combined
      Nine-Speed Automatic: 31 City/47 Highway/37 Combined
      “Chevrolet is dedicated to offering customers a wide range of propulsion options. We know there are customers looking for the right combination of fuel efficiency, driving dynamics, fuel type and more. With the EPA-estimated 52-mpg highway Cruze Diesel Sedan, they can get it all,” said Steven Majoros, director of Chevrolet Marketing in a statement.
      A quick refresher on the Cruze Diesel: it will use a turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder producing 137 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque. The sedan will be arriving in the coming weeks with prices beginning at $24,670. The hatchback will get the diesel option next year.
      Source: Chevrolet
      Press Release is on Page 2
      CRUZE DIESEL SEDAN SETS 52-MPG BENCHMARK
      EPA Certifies Segment-Best Highway Mileage DETROIT — The 2017 Cruze Diesel Sedan offers up to an EPA-estimated highway mileage of 52 mpg — the highest highway fuel economy of any non-hybrid/non-EV in America. Based upon the EPA highway estimate, Cruze Diesel with the six-speed manual transmission has an estimated range of up to 702 highway miles on one tank of diesel fuel.
      “Chevrolet is dedicated to offering customers a wide range of propulsion options. We know there are customers looking for the right combination of fuel efficiency, driving dynamics, fuel type and more. With the EPA-estimated 52-mpg highway Cruze Diesel Sedan, they can get it all,” said Steven Majoros, director of Chevrolet Marketing.
      The 2017 Cruze Diesel Sedan features a new Ecotec 1.6-liter inline four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine offering an SAE-certified 137 horsepower (102 kW) and 240 lb-ft of torque (325 Nm). Cruze Diesel passed all stringent U.S. environmental standards and validation, including Tier 3 Bin 125 emissions standards.
      Buyers will be able to option their Cruze Diesel Sedans with either a standard six-speed manual or a new, optional Hydra-Matic nine-speed automatic transmission that includes fuel-saving stop/start technology.
      In addition to its segment-leading EPA-estimated 52 mpg highway fuel economy, Cruze Diesel with the six-speed manual returns an EPA-estimated city mileage of 30 mpg, resulting in 37 mpg combined. Cruze Diesel with the nine-speed automatic achieves an EPA-estimated highway economy of up to 47 mpg and 31 city mpg, which results in 37 mpg combined.
      A suite of connectivity features complements the Cruze Diesel Sedan’s inherent efficiency. These include available OnStar with 4G LTE connectivity and built-in Wi-Fi hotspot and available Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility through Chevrolet MyLink.*
      Pricing for 2017 Cruze Diesel Sedan starts at $24,670 including $875 destination charge. Cruze Diesel Hatch will follow Cruze Diesel Sedan later this year for the 2018 model year.

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Another piece of the 2017 Chevrolet Cruze Diesel puzzle has been revealed. The official EPA numbers have been released and they are quite impressive. 
      Six-Speed Manual: 30 City/52 Highway/37 Combined
      Nine-Speed Automatic: 31 City/47 Highway/37 Combined
      “Chevrolet is dedicated to offering customers a wide range of propulsion options. We know there are customers looking for the right combination of fuel efficiency, driving dynamics, fuel type and more. With the EPA-estimated 52-mpg highway Cruze Diesel Sedan, they can get it all,” said Steven Majoros, director of Chevrolet Marketing in a statement.
      A quick refresher on the Cruze Diesel: it will use a turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder producing 137 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque. The sedan will be arriving in the coming weeks with prices beginning at $24,670. The hatchback will get the diesel option next year.
      Source: Chevrolet
      Press Release is on Page 2
      CRUZE DIESEL SEDAN SETS 52-MPG BENCHMARK
      EPA Certifies Segment-Best Highway Mileage DETROIT — The 2017 Cruze Diesel Sedan offers up to an EPA-estimated highway mileage of 52 mpg — the highest highway fuel economy of any non-hybrid/non-EV in America. Based upon the EPA highway estimate, Cruze Diesel with the six-speed manual transmission has an estimated range of up to 702 highway miles on one tank of diesel fuel.
      “Chevrolet is dedicated to offering customers a wide range of propulsion options. We know there are customers looking for the right combination of fuel efficiency, driving dynamics, fuel type and more. With the EPA-estimated 52-mpg highway Cruze Diesel Sedan, they can get it all,” said Steven Majoros, director of Chevrolet Marketing.
      The 2017 Cruze Diesel Sedan features a new Ecotec 1.6-liter inline four-cylinder turbo-diesel engine offering an SAE-certified 137 horsepower (102 kW) and 240 lb-ft of torque (325 Nm). Cruze Diesel passed all stringent U.S. environmental standards and validation, including Tier 3 Bin 125 emissions standards.
      Buyers will be able to option their Cruze Diesel Sedans with either a standard six-speed manual or a new, optional Hydra-Matic nine-speed automatic transmission that includes fuel-saving stop/start technology.
      In addition to its segment-leading EPA-estimated 52 mpg highway fuel economy, Cruze Diesel with the six-speed manual returns an EPA-estimated city mileage of 30 mpg, resulting in 37 mpg combined. Cruze Diesel with the nine-speed automatic achieves an EPA-estimated highway economy of up to 47 mpg and 31 city mpg, which results in 37 mpg combined.
      A suite of connectivity features complements the Cruze Diesel Sedan’s inherent efficiency. These include available OnStar with 4G LTE connectivity and built-in Wi-Fi hotspot and available Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility through Chevrolet MyLink.*
      Pricing for 2017 Cruze Diesel Sedan starts at $24,670 including $875 destination charge. Cruze Diesel Hatch will follow Cruze Diesel Sedan later this year for the 2018 model year.
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      I wasn’t too keen on the redesigned Hyundai Elantra I drove last year. In the review, I said it didn’t really do enough to compete with the likes of the Chevrolet Cruze and Honda Civic. But maybe the model could redeem itself with the introduction of the Elantra Sport. Hyundai made some key changes such as adding a turbo engine, revised rear suspension, and slight tweaks inside and out. 
      I was really excited to check it out and spend some quality time with it. But life had other plans. The day I was supposed to get the Elantra Sport, I took a tumble down a flight of stairs, causing a fracture in my right leg. Because of this, I really didn’t get to spent a lot of time in the Sport. This is going to be more of a first impressions piece than a review. Hopefully, in the near future, I get to spend some time in the Sport again, barring any injuries.
      Hyundai only made some small changes such as a blacked out grille, side skirts, rear diffuser, and 18-inch alloy wheels for the Sport. The end result is something that stands out from other Elantra’s, but not to the point where it looks like someone went on a shopping spree in the JC Whitney catalog. The only changes the Elantra Sport gets inside are new front seats with extra side bolstering, different gauge layout, and a flat-bottom steering wheel. Otherwise, it is your standard Elantra interior which isn’t a bad thing. The simple dash layout comes paired with the use higher quality materials. Back seat space has seen a nice improvement in terms of legroom, while headroom is still slightly tight for taller folks. Under the hood is a new turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 201 horsepower and 195 pound-feet of torque. This can be paired with a six-speed manual or my tester’s seven-speed DCT. It should be noted this engine is also being used in the recently refreshed Kia Soul! (Exclaim), but it only comes with the DCT. First impressions of this powertrain were disappointing. It doesn’t feel eager to accelerate quickly as the DCT bogs down at lower speeds. Once above a certain speed, the powertrain becomes alive. Hyundai engineered the 1.6 to deliver torque evenly across the rpm band which gives the impression that you will not run out of steam anytime soon. The DCT delivers quick up and downshifts. You can remove most of the bogginess by putting the vehicle into the Sport mode which sharpens the throttle response and quickens gear changes. This makes the Elantra Sport raring to go when leaving from a stop or acerbating from a corner. Underneath the Elantra Sport’s skin, Hyundai has made some significant changes to the chassis. The big change is a new multi-link rear suspension setup that is said to improve the driving dynamics. There is also revised springs, dampers, and steering ratio. End result? This is Hyundai’s best effort in making a fun to drive vehicle. Body roll is minimized and the vehicle feels poised when going into a corner. Steering is still a mixed bag. Turn-in is quick and there is plenty of weight, but there is barely any feedback from the road. For a sporty model, it is a bit disappointing. Compared to the standard Elantra, the Sport does let a few bumps come inside. But it isn’t to a point where your back will be in pain. There’s a nice balance between handling and comfort. Pricing for the Elantra Sport starts at $21,650 for the manual and $22,750 for the DCT. The Elantra Sport seen here came with an as-tested price of $25,985 as it featured an optional premium package that adds a number of features such as an 8-inch touchscreen with navigation, sunroof, blind-spot monitoring with rear-cross traffic alert, and upgraded audio system. Where does the Elantra Sport fit in? It is like the Nissan Sentra SR Turbo/NISMO where it is sportier than the standard model, but not a full blown sport compact like the Volkswagen Golf GTI or Ford Focus ST. Think of it a warm compact and one that is quite surprising (for the brief time I drove it). Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Elantra Sport, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Elantra
      Trim: Sport
      Engine: 1.6 Turbo GDI DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder
      Driveline: Seven-speed DCT, Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 201 @ 6000 
      Torque @ RPM: 195 @ 1500~4500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/33/29
      Curb Weight: 3,131 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, Alabama
      Base Price: $22,750
      As Tested Price: $25,985 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package for Sport - $2,400.00
    • By William Maley
      About two years ago at the SEMA show, Chevrolet showed off a collection of vehicles with a concept trim package known as Red Line. The vehicles featured a number of trim pieces finished in black and red to give off a sinister look. The reaction to these concepts was positive, causing Chevrolet to investigate whether or not to bring this into production.
      This morning, Chevrolet revealed the Redline special edition. This brings a set of black wheels with red hash marks, blacked-out grilles, black Bowtie badges, and black nameplates with red outlines. Chevrolet mentions that each model in the Redline lineup will have their own exclusive touches. For example, the Silverado and Colorado will get red tow hooks.
      Chevrolet will offer eight Redline special edition models. Aside from the Silverado and Colorado, Redline will be available on,
      Cruze LT (sedan and hatchback) Malibu LT Camaro LT/SS (coupe and convertible) Trax LT Equinox LT Traverse Premier Chevrolet says you can order the Silverado Redline right now. Other models will be available later this year.
      Source: Chevrolet
      Press Release is on Page 2
      REDLINE TAKES CHEVROLET DESIGN TO THE NEXT LEVEL
      Broadest cross-portfolio special edition offers customized vehicles right from the factory CHICAGO – Today, Chevrolet announced the introduction of the Redline special edition series at the Chicago Auto Show. Available on nine Chevrolet cars, trucks and crossovers, Redline is the broadest cross-portfolio special edition ever offered by the brand.
      Redline made its debut in concept form at the 2015 SEMA Show in Las Vegas. Inspired by a strong positive reception from customers and the success of special editions across the portfolio, Chevrolet expanded Redline across nine vehicles in the car, truck and crossover segments:
      Cruze LT (sedan and hatchback) Malibu LT Camaro LT/SS (coupe and convertible) Trax LT Equinox LT Traverse Premier Colorado LT Silverado Double Cab LT Z71, Crew Cab LTZ Z71 “Redline is another example of Chevrolet bringing SEMA concepts to showrooms,” said Brian Sweeney, U.S. vice president of Chevrolet. “The SEMA show has proven to be a great way to identify customization trends in the industry, and quickly apply those trends to our most popular Chevrolet models. Based on the strong interest Redline attracted at the show, we believe they will be very popular with customers looking for standout cars, trucks, and crossovers.” 
      All Redline vehicles are equipped with black wheels featuring distinct red hash marks, black nameplates with a red outline, blacked-out grilles and black Chevrolet bowtie logos.
      From there, vehicles feature design elements tailored to the preferences of those specific customers. For example, the Silverado and Colorado Redlines feature red tow hooks, while Camaro Redline features unique black hash marks above the wheels, a design cue taken from Chevy’s long heritage in motorsports.
      “Our special edition lineup has been popular with customers and dealers, alike” said Sweeney. “Since the introduction of special editions on vehicles the like Silverado and Camaro, vehicle average transaction prices have increased, time to turn has decreased, and conquest rates have risen, which has contributed to making Chevrolet the fastest-growing brand in the industry two years in a row.”
      Silverado Redlines are the first available for purchase; orders can be placed at Chevrolet dealerships now. Availability will be cadenced, and all Redline vehicles will be available for purchase by the end of 2017 calendar year.

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)