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    The Brief: Closing Out the 2015 Reviews (Part 1)


    • Closing out 2015 with the final reviews of vehicles from this year

    The end of another year is upon us and I’m in the process of picking my favorite vehicles from the year. But before we get to that, I need to give some vehicles their time in the review spotlight. Trying to crank a review or a two a week is a hard task for some folks, myself included. I tend to spend a week with a vehicle, driving it in my daily routine, taking notes and photos, and hopefully beginning the review before the vehicle leaves. But that last part is the thickest part as it doesn’t always work out because of life. Whether it's a personal or family emergency, vacation, changes in work, or just being distracted, life always finds a way to get in and mess up whatever you are trying to do.

     

    Towards the end of every year, I have a small number of vehicles that have fallen between the cracks and are just waiting for me to find them and write something up. This year is no different as seven vehicles have been waiting patiently for their turn and their time has come. We're going to be looking at the first four of the seven.

     

    For this piece, I’ll be listing the good and bad of each vehicle, along with some notes that I took on each vehicle.

     

    2016 Acura ILX A-Spec
    2.4L 16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC Four-Cylinder (201 Horsepower, 180 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Eight-Speed Dual-Clutch Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $31,830/$32,830

     

    Cheers: Excellent handling in the corners, improved styling, large back seat
    Jeers: Engine has to be worked hard, a large amount of wind and road noise, bouncy ride, questionable material choice, poor value when compared to competitors.

     

    Notes: Acura went back to the drawing board this year with the ILX in an effort to fix the slumping sales of the model. Some of the fixes do make a difference such as a new front clip and headlights that give some much need aggression. Inside, a set of leather and suede seats add a nice touch and provide good comfort. It should be noted the seats come with the A-Spec package. The engine lineup which included a 2.0L, 2.4L, and hybrid has been simplified to just the 2.4 with 201 horsepower. This eliminates one of the big problems for the ILX of being too slow if you opted for the hybrid or 2.0L. One item that Acura didn’t mess with was the handling. The ILX is a sweetheart around corners as it provides minimal body roll and excellent steering. Acura also made sure that the ILX’s suspension was compliant when dealing with bumps on a day-to-day basis, something it does very well.

     

    Sadly, that is where the good points of the ILX end. Despite Acura’s attempt on improving the ILX’s interior, it looks and in some parts, feels like the Civic that it is based on. Not something you want to be said since this vehicle competes in the same class as the Audi A3 and Buick Verano, both with impressive interiors. The 2.4L has the power to compete with the vehicles in the class. But to access this power, you’ll need to be working the engine somewhat hard - around 3,000 to 4,000 rpm. This would be ok if the ILX had a six-speed manual. But Acura dropped it for this year, replacing it with an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic. There isn’t anything wrong with the dual-clutch transmission, it’s quite smooth and doesn’t hesitate when going up or down. But it makes working the engine to its fullest, boring and not joyful.

     

    But the biggest problem for the ILX is the price. This particular ILX came with an as-tested price of $32,830 and that doesn’t include one of the huge changes for the model, a load of additional safety equipment. Acura added a number of safety systems such as blind-spot monitoring, rear cross traffic alert, adaptive cruise control, collision mitigation, and road departure mitigation. To get all of this, you need to either get the ILX Technology Plus ($32,990) or the ILX Technology Plus and A-Spec ($34,890). Around that price, you could get yourself into a well-equipped Buick Verano Turbo with much more amenities and better performance.

     

    2015 Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk
    3.2L 24-Valve VVT V6 (271 Horsepower, 239 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Nine-Speed Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $30,395/$36,869

     

    Cheers: Sharp Looks, Very Capable Off-Road, V6 Performance
    Jeers: Ninth-Gear Seems Non-Existent, Price-Tag, Annoying Stop-Start System

     

    Notes: In my original review of the 2014 Jeep Cherokee, I said that I was very impressed as Jeep made the leap from a boxy, go-anywhere SUV to sharp looking crossover with some Jeep DNA still there. But I wasn’t as impressed with the nine-speed automatic as it shuddered through the first three gears and wouldn’t go into ninth. At the time, I put the Cherokee on the wait and see list. A year has passed and another Cherokee has come in for a review.

     

    This particular Cherokee is the top of the line Trailhawk and it features a number of changes to make it a ‘Trail-Rated’ model by Jeep. Outside are a set of tow hooks on the front and rear bumper to pull out the vehicle if it gets stuck. A set seventeen-inch aluminum wheels come wrapped in meaty all-terrain tires to get you through whatever muck you decide to go through. Done up in a sharp red, the Cherokee Trailhawk makes no apologies of what its intended purpose is - going off-road.

     

    Under the skin, the Cherokee Trailhawk comes with Jeep Active Drive II. This four-wheel drive system is quite advanced as it offers a low-range setting for rock crawling and a rear lock to improve traction. Other changes for the Trailhawk include an off-road suspension with a one-inch lift, skid plates, and a 56:1 crawl ratio. We did some light off-roading on a dirt trail and found the Trailhawk to very capable as the four-wheel drive kept power flowing to us moving. Also, the suspension provided a very comfortable ride over the trail.

     

    Power for the Trailhawk comes from the optional 3.2L V6 with 271 horsepower and 239 pound-feet. This engine feels plenty powerful for any situation that it is thrown at it. It also very refined during acceleration and at cruise. One part of the engine we aren’t keen on is the stop-start system. We found it be somewhat annoying as the engine wouldn’t always shut off, despite our foot planted firmly on the brake pedal. We mostly left it off for the majority of the week. As for the nine-speed automatic, it has been cleaned up for the most part. Gone is the shuddering we experienced in our first Cherokee, replaced by smooth and crisp shifts. Still, the transmission was very hesitant to go into ninth gear. We drove about 50 miles on the freeway at a 70 MPH cruise to see if it would go into ninth and no luck. At least, the ride is smooth and refined, even with the off-road tires.

     

    The big problem for the Cherokee Trailhawk is the price. The base model will set you back $30,395. Our test Trailhawk with a few options such as the V6, navigation, and a couple of other packages to reach an as-tested price of $36,869. That is a lot of money for a small crossover. But considering the number of changes to make the Trailhawk a very capable model, we think that for some folks who want the capability of something like a Wrangler, but with a bit more comfort should give this model a look. Everyone else should stick with the Latitude or Altitude models.

     

    2016 Mazda CX-5 Touring
    2.5L Skyactiv-G Four-Cylinder (184 Horsepower, 185 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Six-Speed Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $26,465/$28,835

     

    Cheers: Improved Dash Makes Huge Difference, New Infotainment System, Performance and Fuel Economy, Excellent Handling
    Jeers: Road and Wind Noise are still in abundance

     

    Notes: It seems every time we get into the CX-5, Mazda has done some sort of change to it. The last time we drove a CX-5, it came with the new 2.5L version of the Skyactiv-G four-cylinder. The 2016 model fixes two of the biggest complaints we had in previous CX-5’s; the plain dashboard and poor infotainment system.

     

    We’ll start with the dash. First seen in the 2016 Mazda6, the dashboard looks more premium thanks to improved materials and new shapes. The new dash also brings in Mazda Connect, the latest infotainment system. This system is a huge improvement over the old system in terms of overall performance and usability. We didn’t have the issue of the navigation system showing you traveling on a different than the one you were on like we did in the 6.

     

    The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation and the chassis that provides superb handling in the corners. One issue we hope Mazda addresses in the future is noise isolation. There is still an abundance of wind and road noise entering the cabin.

     

    The 2016 Mazda CX-5 shows the continual improvement that the Japanese automaker has been doing is making it a better vehicle.

     

    2015 Toyota Avalon XLE Touring
    3.5L DOHC 24-Valve Dual VVT-i V6 (268 Horsepower, 248 Pound-Feet of Torque)
    Six-Speed Automatic
    Base/As-Tested: $36,080/$37,130

     

    Cheers: Stylish Look, Powerful V6, Upscale Interior, Excellent Fuel Economy
    Jeers: Sporty ride may turn off some buyers

     

    Notes: I came away very impressed when I drove the Avalon Hybrid a couple years ago. The combination of sharp styling, sporty ride, and amazing fuel economy made me pick this as one of my favorite vehicles of that year. But would the regular Avalon receive the same praise? Mostly.

     

    The Avalon is still one the sharpest looking full-size sedans with a low-slung front end, narrow grille, and coupe-like roofline. The interior is much the same as the hybrid with loads of space for both front and rear seat passengers, comfortable leather seats, and a impressive design with quality materials used throughout. Unlike the hybrid, our XLE Touring came with the smaller seven-inch Entune infotainment system. It still is easy to use and quick to respond whenever you touch the screen or one of the capacitive touch buttons.

     

    Power comes from a 3.5L V6 which is used in a number of other Toyota and Lexus products. Horsepower is rated at 268 and torque is rated at 248 pound-feet. The engine is quite a peach as speed comes on at a very quick rate. But the engine is also quiet during acceleration, making a perfect highway companion. In the corners, the Avalon displays a level of athleticism not seen in other full-size sedans. Body roll is kept in check and the steering provides decent weight. This does mean the Avalon isn’t as comfortable as competitors as some bumps do make their way into the interior.

     

    Disclaimer: Acura, Jeep, Mazda, and Toyota Provided the vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

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    Nice little write up. Good to hear a little first-hand experience with a few vehicle I could see myself in or considering in the next couple of years( ILX, Cherokee, CX-5). 

     

    I know you said "The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation" but is the 184hp/185tq really enough..? I mean I know day to day it is plenty but would it keep an enthusiast "entertained" while not owning something sportier? That's why I went with the 2.0T in my Escape. At the time I couldn't find a CX-5 with a 2.5 in my price range and I knew the original 2.0 making something like 155hp would not cut it so I never drove a CX-5. 

     

    I'm also really curious about the 9spd in the Cherokee. Is it really that difficult to get it into 9th? How fast do you have to go before it'll shift into 9th? Also, what are your experiences with the 3.2 and 9spd for fuel economy? It seems like it has potential to be be a very good combination but if it isn't using all of its gears...

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    Nice little write up. Good to hear a little first-hand experience with a few vehicle I could see myself in or considering in the next couple of years( ILX, Cherokee, CX-5). 

     

    I know you said "The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation" but is the 184hp/185tq really enough..? I mean I know day to day it is plenty but would it keep an enthusiast "entertained" while not owning something sportier? That's why I went with the 2.0T in my Escape. At the time I couldn't find a CX-5 with a 2.5 in my price range and I knew the original 2.0 making something like 155hp would not cut it so I never drove a CX-5. 

     

    I'm also really curious about the 9spd in the Cherokee. Is it really that difficult to get it into 9th? How fast do you have to go before it'll shift into 9th? Also, what are your experiences with the 3.2 and 9spd for fuel economy? It seems like it has potential to be be a very good combination but if it isn't using all of its gears...

     

    CX-5: It would, but compared to your Escape it would be a different type of fun. If you want to work the engine somewhat (reving it up a little bit to enjoy the power) then a CX-5 is perfect. But if you want some instantaneous power, then the Escape with the 2.0T is the better option.

    Cherokee: As I understand it, you have to be a steady 70 to 75 MPH on a flat road for ninth gear to engage. I have done it in this and the ProMaster City, and only got either one to eighth. Fuel economy, I think I got an average of 23 MPG.

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    Great write up, I am also interested in why they tranny would not go into 9th gear for the jeep. Would be good to find out what is up with that.

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    Nice little write up. Good to hear a little first-hand experience with a few vehicle I could see myself in or considering in the next couple of years( ILX, Cherokee, CX-5). 

     

    I know you said "The CX-5 is still a joy to drive thanks to the 2.5L Skyactiv-G four-cylinder providing more than enough power for any situation" but is the 184hp/185tq really enough..? I mean I know day to day it is plenty but would it keep an enthusiast "entertained" while not owning something sportier? That's why I went with the 2.0T in my Escape. At the time I couldn't find a CX-5 with a 2.5 in my price range and I knew the original 2.0 making something like 155hp would not cut it so I never drove a CX-5. 

     

    I'm also really curious about the 9spd in the Cherokee. Is it really that difficult to get it into 9th? How fast do you have to go before it'll shift into 9th? Also, what are your experiences with the 3.2 and 9spd for fuel economy? It seems like it has potential to be be a very good combination but if it isn't using all of its gears...

     

    CX-5: It would, but compared to your Escape it would be a different type of fun. If you want to work the engine somewhat (reving it up a little bit to enjoy the power) then a CX-5 is perfect. But if you want some instantaneous power, then the Escape with the 2.0T is the better option.

    Cherokee: As I understand it, you have to be a steady 70 to 75 MPH on a flat road for ninth gear to engage. I have done it in this and the ProMaster City, and only got either one to eighth. Fuel economy, I think I got an average of 23 MPG.

     

    Does the Cherokee have an instant mpg readout? Just cuious what it was reading when cruising at 70-75mph. 

     

    Also, how was the mileage in the CX-5? You never said if it was FWD or AWD, I'm assuming FWD..? I don't mind working the engine for some fun-time but if its like a passing situation the 2.0 really impresses me when I put my foot on the floor and I'm "afraid" the 2.5 in the Mazda just wouldn't really be enough. I'd REALLY like to drive one, along with the new Cherokee. 

     

    Yeah, the trans thing seems odd to me. Why put in a transmission that doesn't even use all of its gears? I guess I could see for states with speed limits of 80mph, as long as it actually shifts into 9th then. Maley, Do you know at what speed the trans will finally shift into 9th? I'd definitely have to fiddle around with that because it would drive me nuts. Could you manually put it in 9th going 70/75mph? 

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    Mazda just doesn't seek to make their vehicles tomb like, other Japanese manuf.'s also lack noise reduction (Honda that is you).  It would be nice to see Mazda drop that turbo 2.5 into the CX-5 as a high level option.

     

    As nice as the CX-5 is, the available 2.0 in the Escape to me makes all the difference in the world.  And the Escape prices right now are insane with the rebates.  You can get a 2.0 as a great deal and the real world mpg vs. the smaller Ecoboost is not much of a difference.

     

    Ford will be fixing some of the cabin issues in 2017 with the Escape and a new again 2.0 and that at that point I wonder if the CX-5 has any remaining advantages over an Escape.

     

    I can see where Jeep fans would like the Cherokee but i can't get on board with it, I do give it credit for being a solid offering.  The 9th gear in the tranny has to be vaporware!!!!

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