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NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

Chevrolet Captiva LT

9 posts in this topic

June 2007

Chevrolet Captiva LT

Chevrolet Captiva LT

Rating: *** STARS

The Chevrolet Captiva gets a make-over with the refined, if slightly expensive, Captiva LT

Text: Julie Sinclair / Photos: Pete Gibson

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Surprising as it sounds, Chevrolet is about to ditch its all-American, mud-plugging, gas-guzzling image by introducing this all-new soft-roader, badged the Captiva.

...it had more than enough grunt to nip round town and comfortably tackle motorways.

The marque is best known for its full-sized 4x4s sold in the US. But it's promising this latest SUV, which goes on sale in the UK later this month, will be the first in a fresh range of smaller models it plans to launch over the next five years.

What's more, to show they mean business, bosses are offering the new seven-seater with the most advanced diesel engine the company has ever built. And first impressions are very good. The Captiva's chunky, wedge shape certainly looks the part, while the sloping roofline, distinctive headlamps and chrome detailing provide it with an upmarket feel.

Add in the flexible and spacious interior of our LT test model, and the car should appeal to style-conscious families who need the capacity of a people carrier for the school run, but want a sporty and rugged-looking machine for the weekends.

Inside, the cabin is as smart as it is roomy, and the instruments are all clearly laid out. We liked the dark upholstery on the version we drove, too. Yet while the Chevrolet has a good, elevated driving position, the seats simply don't provide enough comfort - we found the lack of side support and the unusually high lumbar soon took their toll.

Visibility is excellent, which makes manoeuvring the car's bulky frame a breeze. But it's still worth specifying the optional parking sensors, as the raised rear can mean it's difficult to judge reversing distances.

Further back, you can create extra space in the boot by folding the standard 60/40-split rear bench flat - this sees luggage capacity increase from 465 litres to 930 litres. The trouble is, until you get used to the system, it's a fiddly and back-breaking pro-cess. Nevertheless, loading items into the boot couldn't be much easier, because owners can choose to open only the window hatch, rather than the whole tailgate.

On the road, we were impressed by the 2.0-litre diesel engine, which has been developed at Chevrolet's plant in South Korea. It won't exactly set your pulse racing, but with power and torque outputs of 148bhp and 320Nm respectively, it had more than enough grunt to nip round town and comfortably tackle motorways.

The unit is mated to an automatic gearbox - which comes with a manual shift option - so progress through the ratios is steady, relatively smooth and quiet. Top brass have told us we won't see this transmission on the options list for the Captiva's sister car, the Vauxhall Antara. However, other models in the Chevrolet line-up are likely to benefit.

The biggest letdown on the new SUV, though, is the handling. While the ride is comfortable, it's not particularly well controlled, so over uneven surfaces, the soft set-up leaves occupants bumping around the cabin. The steering is vague, too, so you won't push the car into bends with relish.

To go with its rugged styling, our model featured a clever hill descent system plus an on-demand All Wheel Drive set-up. Over rough terrain, it's no more capable than any of its soft-roader rivals, but then most Captivas are unlikely to venture far off the tarmac. With this in mind, Chevy offers an entry-level front-wheel-drive 2.4-litre petrol version. A strict five-seater, this car features a manual transmission and costs £16,995. That's £5,000 less than our seven-seat diesel model.

The Captiva is an impressive first attempt at a smaller SUV from Chevrolet. It's not cheap and isn't without its flaws, but its combination of a strong diesel engine in a spacious, practical package is sure to appeal.

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Source:

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/carreviews/fi...et_captiva.html

Edited by NINETY EIGHT REGENCY
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I haven't been keeping up on this vehicle, and I should have, because my wife drives the Equinox and she will want to replace our 2005 in the next year or so. Is this what is coming to replace the Equinox?

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No, this is a compact crossover SUV that's based on the 106" wheelbase version of the Theta architecture (the mid-size Equinox uses a 112" version). I read here that it was rumored to be imported to Canada, but never heard of it coming here. It was based on the 2005 S3X concept car. This is similar to the also-compact Saturn VUE/Opel/Vauxhall Antara, and the Captiva, which has a stretched rear end (its about 3 inches longer than VUE/Antara), to accommodate a (likely tight) third row of optional seats, for a total of 7-passenger capacity, where as VUE/Antara/Equinox seat 5. Also, the Chevy Captiva is imported into Australia as the Holden Captiva, with exception of the Maxx model, which is actually the Antara.

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That name...

!!!New CAPTIVA LT!!!

WARNING

CAPTIVA LT is a prescription medicine for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. You should not take CAPTIVA LT if you have low blood calcium, cannot sit or stand for at least 60 minutes, have severe kidney disease, or are allergic to CAPTIVA LT. Stop taking CAPTIVA LT and tell your healthcare provider if you experience difficult or painful swallowing, chest pain, or severe or continuing heartburn, as these may be signs of serious upper digestive problems. Follow the once-monthly CAPTIVA LT dosing instructions carefully to lower the chance of these events occurring. Side effects are generally mild or moderate and may include diarrhea, pain in the arms or legs, or upset stomach. If you develop severe bone, joint, and/or muscle pain, contact your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider may also recommend a calcium and vitamin D supplement.

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I hope it comes to Canada, it would be perfect for my dad. He wants to ditch the van, and wanted an Equinox, but it wasn't fuel efficient enough (Now he's looking at Impala 3.5Ls)

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I haven't been keeping up on this vehicle, and I should have, because my wife drives the Equinox and she will want to replace our 2005 in the next year or so. Is this what is coming to replace the Equinox?

You're asking us? No, the Equinox is being replaced by another lwb model, probably wider to better match the Edge and Highlander, but again priced too low to make a list of comparable mid-size crossovers. The Equinox's discount price also means the Chevy and GM trucks planned on the shorter wheelbase of the Captiva have been cancelled, apparently in favor of even smaller and cheaper crossovers closer to the Patriot, Tucson etc.
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No, this is a compact crossover SUV that's based on the 106" wheelbase version of the Theta architecture (the mid-size Equinox uses a 112" version). I read here that it was rumored to be imported to Canada, but never heard of it coming here. It was based on the 2005 S3X concept car. This is similar to the also-compact Saturn VUE/Opel/Vauxhall Antara, and the Captiva, which has a stretched rear end (its about 3 inches longer than VUE/Antara), to accommodate a (likely tight) third row of optional seats, for a total of 7-passenger capacity, where as VUE/Antara/Equinox seat 5. Also, the Chevy Captiva is imported into Australia as the Holden Captiva, with exception of the Maxx model, which is actually the Antara.

The third row in the Captiva is not bad, certainly better than the late Highlander (which didn't have one at first) or the new RAV4 (which doesn't have one in Australia—the only other market I know with the lwb version).
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