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NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

What Drives Consumers Not To Buy GM Cars

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JULY 9, 2007

What Drives Consumers Not To Buy GM Cars

Readers Report

What Drives Consumers Not To Buy GM Cars

"Putting designers in the driver's seat" (Design, June 18) clearly reveals what's wrong with American auto companies. They just won't listen!

Only once does Chevrolet Malibu designer Clay Dean use the word "consumer." He speaks mostly of other cars, strains between design and engineering, costs, designer stress, and aesthetics. And all the while, consumers with years of driving experience are standing on the sidelines jumping up and down, yelling: "Ask me! Ask me!" But the design entourage hurries past without giving us the time of day. What could we possibly know.

We're told that "Dean was also looking for a rakish bulge in the hood to convey power." So, Clay, how about giving us some real power...and some fuel economy and headroom while you're at it.

In the same June 18 issue, wine critic Robert Parker says: "If you detect a vegetal character, say asparagus or green beans, the wine is flawed." Seems to me that some asparagus has found its way into the Malibu's design process.

Ed Powers

Lumberton, N.C.

We buy a car every five years and currently own four cars, a motorcycle, and a 1948 airplane. Only three of the cars have memorable, fun-to-drive features. Technical, and not aesthetic, design prompts our purchase decisions.

Americans have switched from Detroit Big Three vehicles to Honda (HMC ) and Toyota (TM ) vehicles not for visual design features but for durability, reliability, good fuel consumption, and low full cost of operation. Detroit needs to offer five-passenger, 35-mile-per-gallon vehicles with 100,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranties over 10 years of ownership to cause satisfied Honda and Toyota buyers to switch. Subsidizing $65-an-hour United Auto Workers wage and benefit packages is not on our priority list.

Joseph J. Neff

Corning, Calif.

I wish General Motors (GM ) all the luck with the new Malibu. They will need it. Although the car does look great, I doubt it can beat the Camry or the Accord. Several years ago, my Dad bought a 1998 Malibu. By the time his car reached the 15,500-mile mark, he had to replace the front discs and brake pads. Pretty early if you ask me. Meanwhile, a friend who drives a Honda Accord changed his front brakes when he reached the 30,000-mile mark.

Design is important. But when will Detroit understand that car buyers want reliability and durability, not just over a one-, two-, or three-year period but very long-term durability? Cars like the Camry still feel nimble and solid after 6, 8, or even 10 years of use. Granted, the Big Three have made great strides in quality, but they still have a long way to go.

As for the Malibu, please GM, don't skimp on the quality of your components. You will just drive more customers to Toyota and Honda.

Louis Lafortune

Gatineau, Quebec

GM's [strategy] makes sense because the design is what gets us consumers in the door. With four children and their friends, I look to fill all the "advertised" seats. Unfortunately, not seeing rear center headrests in GM vehicles makes me walk right back out. I have been driving Hondas and Toyotas and would love to shop for an American vehicle such as the stylishly new Chevy Suburban or GMC Acadia. So, whose kids do I place into those seats without headrests? My neighbors'? Sorry, GM, you need functionality along with the design.

Eric Weitze

Skillman, N.J.

Putting more focus on automobile design certainly can't hurt General Motors' prospects, but better looks won't make up for woefully behind-the-times transmissions (only now is GM starting to offer automatics with five speeds—and it's a costly option), badly outclassed engines based on ancient push-rod technology, and steering and suspension that communicate little-to-no feel for the road.

A year from now, when traveling BusinessWeek readers turn in their spiffy-looking new Malibus at the rental car desk, they'll be glad they're going home to their Altimas (NSANY ), Accords, Camrys, Azeras, and Passats. They might not know exactly which outdated technology it was that made the GM product they just drove for several days so unsatisfying, but they'll know nonetheless that their own cars are much more fun and enjoyable to drive. The underwhelming experience of actually driving GM products is just one reason an ever-increasing number of Americans don't even consider GM products when it's time to buy a new car, no matter how they look. Let's not get started on the GM brand image, real and perceived quality issues, residual value, etc.

Glenn Peake

Atlanta

What an unlikely juxtaposition: General Motors and Google (GOOG ) ("The man behind the Google doodle," Corporation, June 18) in back-to-back articles. The core message—and good news—is that artistic freedom can benefit any organization, whether it be considered leading-edge or lagging-edge.

Robert W. Keidel

Associate Professor of Management

LeBow College of Business Drexel University

Philadelphia

Source:

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/conte...28/c4042014.htm

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I wish General Motors (GM ) all the luck with the new Malibu. They will need it. Although the car does look great, I doubt it can beat the Camry or the Accord. Several years ago, my Dad bought a 1998 Malibu. By the time his car reached the 15,500-mile mark, he had to replace the front discs and brake pads. Pretty early if you ask me. Meanwhile, a friend who drives a Honda Accord changed his front brakes when he reached the 30,000-mile mark.

Ignorant. Does your dad drive like a retard, riding the brakes, panic stopping, and run-and-gunning it between lights? If so, that explains your low brake life.

With four children and their friends, I look to fill all the "advertised" seats. Unfortunately, not seeing rear center headrests in GM vehicles makes me walk right back out. I have been driving Hondas and Toyotas and would love to shop for an American vehicle such as the stylishly new Chevy Suburban or GMC Acadia. So, whose kids do I place into those seats without headrests? My neighbors'? Sorry, GM, you need functionality along with the design.

Why are you the neighborhood bitch hauling everyone around?

A year from now, when traveling BusinessWeek readers turn in their spiffy-looking new Malibus at the rental car desk, they'll be glad they're going home to their Altimas (NSANY ), Accords, Camrys, Azeras, and Passats. They might not know exactly which outdated technology it was that made the GM product they just drove for several days so unsatisfying, but they'll know nonetheless that their own cars are much more fun and enjoyable to drive. The underwhelming experience of actually driving GM products is just one reason an ever-increasing number of Americans don't even consider GM products when it's time to buy a new car, no matter how they look. Let's not get started on the GM brand image, real and perceived quality issues, residual value, etc.

Sure they're not renting that pretty Altima with plastic wheel covers. The Azera? Yeah, people wish driving passion buy the Azera. Spoken like someone with a bus pass.

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The 97-03 Malibu isn't an N-body though. Our dearly departed Skylark (N-bod) needed its first set of front pads at just under 30K. City driving can actually decrease brake life - more times using the brakes over a shorter distance. That could explain the difference between the Malibu and the Accord.

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The 97-03 Malibu isn't an N-body though. Our dearly departed Skylark (N-bod) needed its first set of front pads at just under 30K. City driving can actually decrease brake life - more times using the brakes over a shorter distance. That could explain the difference between the Malibu and the Accord.

they were related

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this is all pre lutz...

after lutz got there... putting the designer in charge opens up freedom...

before lutz got there.. everything was put through group study (focus groups) after group study till deamed, nothing would offend anyone... and your left with a car, that no one loves and no one hates...and because no one loves it... everyone hates it...

what about the fastlane blogs?

if you want to tell gm what your opinions are... that is a good place... because practically anyone thats gonna make anything happen is gonna read your point of view there...

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It is old,

GM lost the public trust and they are now working to earn it back. It takes good product which we now are getting and time for it to prove it's self.

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"Putting designers in the driver's seat" (Design, June 18) clearly reveals what's wrong with American auto companies. They just won't listen!

Only once does Chevrolet Malibu designer Clay Dean use the word "consumer." He speaks mostly of other cars, strains between design and engineering, costs, designer stress, and aesthetics. And all the while, consumers with years of driving experience are standing on the sidelines jumping up and down, yelling: "Ask me! Ask me!" But the design entourage hurries past without giving us the time of day. What could we possibly know.

We're told that "Dean was also looking for a rakish bulge in the hood to convey power." So, Clay, how about giving us some real power...and some fuel economy and headroom while you're at it.

In the same June 18 issue, wine critic Robert Parker says: "If you detect a vegetal character, say asparagus or green beans, the wine is flawed." Seems to me that some asparagus has found its way into the Malibu's design process.

Ed Powers

Lumberton, N.C.

What a silly, silly man you are. Since when was a car's styling/aesthetic design supposed to be "consumer-derived" (to paraphrase your comment)? If that was the case, if every Average Joe just walked in off the street into a design studio that wanted to tailor a car to everyone's tastes, we'd be driving ... well, utter appliances with wheels. Like the Camry, for example. Bland and tasteless, just like a water and bread diet.

We buy a car every five years and currently own four cars, a motorcycle, and a 1948 airplane. Only three of the cars have memorable, fun-to-drive features. Technical, and not aesthetic, design prompts our purchase decisions.

Americans have switched from Detroit Big Three vehicles to Honda (HMC ) and Toyota (TM ) vehicles not for visual design features but for durability, reliability, good fuel consumption, and low full cost of operation. Detroit needs to offer five-passenger, 35-mile-per-gallon vehicles with 100,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranties over 10 years of ownership to cause satisfied Honda and Toyota buyers to switch. Subsidizing $65-an-hour United Auto Workers wage and benefit packages is not on our priority list.

Joseph J. Neff

Corning, Calif.

Well, you see, GM likes to keep jobs in North America. They like to help the economy.

Hundred-thousand mile warranty? Bah. What was it that Chris Farley said about products with exceptionally long warranties in Tommy Boy? Something like, "take[ing] a dump in a box and mark[ing] it guaranteed?" Yeah. It doesn't speak all too well about the product to my ears, as if the automaker is unsure about what it's building. It might give you decent piece of mind, sure. Might make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside, like the warranty fairy might come at night and leave a Benjamin under your pillow. But I know if I bought a GM product, it would be solidly screwed-together unlike a Kia or Hyundai. I mean, yeah they have come a long way, but lets all just admit it: they still have a long, long way to go.

And one more thing: Detroit does offer 35 mpg, five-passenger vehicles, dumb ass. Did you bother to look before you stuck your f@#king foot in your mouth?

I wish General Motors (GM ) all the luck with the new Malibu. They will need it. Although the car does look great, I doubt it can beat the Camry or the Accord. Several years ago, my Dad bought a 1998 Malibu. By the time his car reached the 15,500-mile mark, he had to replace the front discs and brake pads. Pretty early if you ask me. Meanwhile, a friend who drives a Honda Accord changed his front brakes when he reached the 30,000-mile mark.

Design is important. But when will Detroit understand that car buyers want reliability and durability, not just over a one-, two-, or three-year period but very long-term durability? Cars like the Camry still feel nimble and solid after 6, 8, or even 10 years of use. Granted, the Big Three have made great strides in quality, but they still have a long way to go.

As for the Malibu, please GM, don't skimp on the quality of your components. You will just drive more customers to Toyota and Honda.

Louis Lafortune

Gatineau, Quebec

Oh, but I think it can, if not come really, really close. The gap is that small, don't kid yourself. Those leaps and bounds are also present in our G6 (although what few problems we have encountered were due to the fact the previous owners neglected it ... long story, maybe I might tell it before bedtime some night).

Front brake discs and pads? Yeah. That might could have whittled a small bit out of someone's pocket at the time but at least the engine didn't snap a camshaft or decided to toss a few gears out of the transmission like horseshoes. And your driving habits could have contributed to the problem. It's not all the car's fault, no matter what you think moron.

And, again, don't kid yourself. That gap is getting smaller and smaller everyday. You talk as if GM builds Trabant-copies and tries to pass them off as f@#king Rolls Royces.

GM's [strategy] makes sense because the design is what gets us consumers in the door. With four children and their friends, I look to fill all the "advertised" seats. Unfortunately, not seeing rear center headrests in GM vehicles makes me walk right back out. I have been driving Hondas and Toyotas and would love to shop for an American vehicle such as the stylishly new Chevy Suburban or GMC Acadia. So, whose kids do I place into those seats without headrests? My neighbors'? Sorry, GM, you need functionality along with the design.

Eric Weitze

Skillman, N.J.

Rear-center headrests are what gets your panties wet? Jesus Christ, man. Are you that damned picky/stupid. And chances are, an eight-year old isn't gonna be tall enough to use that center-headrest, anyway. My God, that is a pathetic, petty little thing to nitpick a car over. It's like Car & Driver and how when they know they damn-well love a GM product and can hardly fault it, they'll start complaining that the dash isn't soft enough and doesn't feature a hole to have consensual sex with.

Putting more focus on automobile design certainly can't hurt General Motors' prospects, but better looks won't make up for woefully behind-the-times transmissions (only now is GM starting to offer automatics with five speeds—and it's a costly option), badly outclassed engines based on ancient push-rod technology, and steering and suspension that communicate little-to-no feel for the road.

A year from now, when traveling BusinessWeek readers turn in their spiffy-looking new Malibus at the rental car desk, they'll be glad they're going home to their Altimas (NSANY ), Accords, Camrys, Azeras, and Passats. They might not know exactly which outdated technology it was that made the GM product they just drove for several days so unsatisfying, but they'll know nonetheless that their own cars are much more fun and enjoyable to drive. The underwhelming experience of actually driving GM products is just one reason an ever-increasing number of Americans don't even consider GM products when it's time to buy a new car, no matter how they look. Let's not get started on the GM brand image, real and perceived quality issues, residual value, etc.

Glenn Peake

Atlanta

Uh, I am pretty sure that the Malibu will have a five-speed and/or six-speed auto, bud. And it's proven that pushrods are more reliable, so why are people like you bitching about it? That was what you wanted, right? Reliability? Yeah. People like you are either 1.) lying, 2.) hypocrites, or 3.) reading an issue of Consumer Reports or Motor Trend, specifically the tech-nerd's commentary, and walking away thinking you are a damn automotive know-it-all.

And, uh, that second part has got to be a very ignorant statement on your part. If you think an Azera or Camry offers real driving passion and personality, then you obviously have a spoon shoved up your ass and you're eating your own feces as if it's chocolate ice cream.

What an unlikely juxtaposition: General Motors and Google (GOOG ) ("The man behind the Google doodle," Corporation, June 18) in back-to-back articles. The core message—and good news—is that artistic freedom can benefit any organization, whether it be considered leading-edge or lagging-edge.

Robert W. Keidel

Associate Professor of Management

LeBow College of Business Drexel University

Philadelphia

Again, this guy probably couldn't really find a major fault with GM and so started pulling random statements and complants out of his ass to compensate.

Edited by YellowJacket894
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What a bunch of garbage...and who honestly aspires to own an Azera?

someone who cant afford a lucern?

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someone who cant afford a lucern?

Well then you're not aspiring to it, you're settling for it.

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Well, General Motors is bribing people around here to test drive their cars. They have sent out thousands of mailings. If you show up at a lot of these local shows (Dragon boat races, for example) there is a digital kiosk that you can sign up to "win" a car, then they send you an invitation for a $100 gas card. That's right: $100. Even that doesn't work. I sent a blanket email to 35 people who had received these invitations. Only one woman responded and she never showed up.

GM has been trying, I will give them credit. But as UNPAID commissioned salespeople, we are getting pretty exhausted with this crap. They tried it with an iPod last year (three launches of that campaign - all a horrible flop), and now they are giving away $100 in gas. Still no effect.

Just yesterday I gave it the old college try: an Asian couple in a '94 Corolla comes in with their print out for their "test drive." I know all they want is the gas card and run, but the Manager gets them, then turns them to me. (All the other sales guys were faster than me in ducking under their desks, jumping on the phone or tearing out into the parking lot.) Taking a deep breath, I did a full walk-around of the Cobalt, showing all of its strengths against the new Corolla (I am psychic, after all), without actually mentioning the new Corolla. The test drive goes off okay. We sit in the car afterward and I continue to hit home on "wins" (trunk release on the remote, for example). What does the lady come back with? She read "somewhere" that GM's transmissions aren't any good. WTF? Lady, I said, BMW uses our transmissions, for GAWD's sake. Even the GM-hating media grudgingly says we have the best transmissions.

When Chinese people don't want to talk about price, I KNOW they are not interested. Mr. Manager had already logged onto the website to qualify them for their gas card. They took my business card and left. It was a Saturday, and i knew they weren't in the market at all; otherwise, I may have taken them over to our sister Toyota store to drive the Corolla, but I knew they just wanted the gas card.

I cannot speak for the rest of the country, but in the GTA our biggest challenge is to get "new Canadians" to consider GM. All their brethren are telling them that American cars are $h!, and I guess they stick together, unlike the rest of us who would rather back stab and in-fight about "freedom of choice" and my God-given right to drive what I want, etc.

Forget the Maytag repairman: the loneliest person is a GM or Ford salesman in Markham, Ontario.

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^ Well I must be in the twilight zone or something.. At the GM dealers here it is insane, too many customers not enough cars. I am in truck country and the Tundra is not thought of as a REAL truck yet. I feel for you carbiz, if you want to sell GMs come to Edmonton!

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^ Well I must be in the twilight zone or something.. At the GM dealers here it is insane, too many customers not enough cars. I am in truck country and the Tundra is not thought of as a REAL truck yet. I feel for you carbiz, if you want to sell GMs come to Edmonton!

well when i was on the lot about 9 months ago... there was always a demand for gm cars or trucks... we had the largest supply of silverados and tahoes in probably the world...

the worlds largest yukon dealership was right next door, and we trumped their sales...

but also longo toyota, the worlds largest dealership was not much more then 5 miles down the road... and even as one of gm's top dealerships (#30 i think but its gone way down since i left) when longo is selling 80-100 cars a day, it just makes any dealership tiny...

and we had a nitch market of hispanics... so we were the biggest chevy in southern cali, while not selling a single fleet vehicle... and most the other ones who were close were mostly fleets...

but for the biggest dealership in socal to be selling 500 cars a month (now down to 300 or so city bought sister store for 17 million) is pitiful... the worlds largest automaker, america's favorite car of choice... to not dominate the worlds largest car market?

too many little dealerships... not enough big ones... gm need to get chevy under control... up the anty on the franchise... so that only the big dealerships can continue, then consolidate... cause the dealerships selling 50-100 cars a month, and half of em being used... that doesnt do $h! for gm except let cars sit on the floor... and also... the little dealerships need cash, so they arent willing to be reasonable with the customers... so they piss off GM's customers

ugg... gm needs to work with its dealerships to grow them out to a size and number that they can properly advertise and sell without starving their sales force...

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"Putting designers in the driver's seat" (Design, June 18) clearly reveals what's wrong with American auto companies. They just won't listen!

Only once does Chevrolet Malibu designer Clay Dean use the word "consumer." He speaks mostly of other cars, strains between design and engineering, costs, designer stress, and aesthetics. And all the while, consumers with years of driving experience are standing on the sidelines jumping up and down, yelling: "Ask me! Ask me!" But the design entourage hurries past without giving us the time of day. What could we possibly know.

We're told that "Dean was also looking for a rakish bulge in the hood to convey power." So, Clay, how about giving us some real power...and some fuel economy and headroom while you're at it.

In the same June 18 issue, wine critic Robert Parker says: "If you detect a vegetal character, say asparagus or green beans, the wine is flawed." Seems to me that some asparagus has found its way into the Malibu's design process.

Ed Powers

Lumberton, N.C.

Bitch, Listen to the Buick Enclave, Cadillac CTS, Chevy Silverado, infommercials and tell me how many times was consumer used. How many times have you heard consumer in the Turd Commercial? If Toy had listened to the consumers, they would not have been producing a Flabby, ugly bitch.
We buy a car every five years and currently own four cars, a motorcycle, and a 1948 airplane. Only three of the cars have memorable, fun-to-drive features. Technical, and not aesthetic, design prompts our purchase decisions.

Americans have switched from Detroit Big Three vehicles to Honda (HMC ) and Toyota (TM ) vehicles not for visual design features but for durability, reliability, good fuel consumption, and low full cost of operation. Detroit needs to offer five-passenger, 35-mile-per-gallon vehicles with 100,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranties over 10 years of ownership to cause satisfied Honda and Toyota buyers to switch. Subsidizing $65-an-hour United Auto Workers wage and benefit packages is not on our priority list.

>>> Neither is it on GM's, why not tell your lawmakers to control those bitches, and let GM give a fair fight to the Japanese and Koreans.

Joseph J. Neff

Corning, Calif.

Tell me ONE vehicle from those aforementioned car manufacturers (Honda and Toy) who DO offer 100,000 mile Bumper to Bumper warranty and I will be your slave. As far as I have seen, GM matches or betters warranties when it comes to Toy and Honda. Do your research!

I wish General Motors (GM ) all the luck with the new Malibu. They will need it. Although the car does look great, I doubt it can beat the Camry or the Accord. Several years ago, my Dad bought a 1998 Malibu. By the time his car reached the 15,500-mile mark, he had to replace the front discs and brake pads. Pretty early if you ask me. Meanwhile, a friend who drives a Honda Accord changed his front brakes when he reached the 30,000-mile mark.

Design is important. But when will Detroit understand that car buyers want reliability and durability, not just over a one-, two-, or three-year period but very long-term durability? Cars like the Camry still feel nimble and solid after 6, 8, or even 10 years of use. Granted, the Big Three have made great strides in quality, but they still have a long way to go. >>>> On what basis are you making that statement, SIRE?

As for the Malibu, please GM, don't skimp on the quality of your components. You will just drive more customers to Toyota and Honda.

Louis Lafortune

Gatineau, Quebec

GM's [strategy]makes sense because the design is what gets us consumers in the door. With four children and their friends, I look to fill all the "advertised" seats. Unfortunately, not seeing rear center headrests in GM vehicles makes me walk right back out. I have been driving Hondas and Toyotas and would love to shop for an American vehicle such as the stylishly new Chevy Suburban or GMC Acadia. So, whose kids do I place into those seats without headrests? My neighbors'? Sorry, GM, you need functionality along with the design.

Eric Weitze

Skillman, N.J.

Hide into your wife's mini-skirt, when you show me which GM vehicle does not have rear head-rests. GM is one of the foremost car manufacturers when it comes to safety. Remember day time running lights? Some of the Toys and Horndogs do not offer it in 2007. And when it rains it is those same old farts driving these "safe" mobiles who do not turn their lights on, when it is a law to do so.

Putting more focus on automobile design certainly can't hurt General Motors' prospects, but better looks won't make up for woefully behind-the-times transmissions (only now is GM starting to offer automatics with five speeds—and it's a costly option), badly outclassed engines based on ancient push-rod technology, and steering and suspension that communicate little-to-no feel for the road.
Honestly, Push-rod vs. MFI is just a horse-$h! argument which the MFI people have won by better marketing. My Push-rod Lumina still gives me 32 mpg on the highway with a 15 year old technology. Yes, GM in 90's were non communicative and boring suspensions. At least I have not changed any of them after driving 156,000 miles, while my Fiance's Crapry has obliterated its suspensions in about 100,000 miles.
A year from now, when traveling BusinessWeek readers turn in their spiffy-looking new Malibus at the rental car desk, they'll be glad they're going home to their Altimas (NSANY ), Accords, Camrys, Azeras, and Passats. They might not know exactly which outdated technology it was that made the GM product they just drove for several days so unsatisfying, but they'll know nonetheless that their own cars are much more fun and enjoyable to drive. The underwhelming experience of actually driving GM products is just one reason an ever-increasing number of Americans don't even consider GM products when it's time to buy a new car, no matter how they look. Let's not get started on the GM brand image, real and perceived quality issues, residual value, etc.

Glenn Peake

Atlanta

Dude, come out of your hole. In rental car centers in Orlando, people rent $h!-sans, Horndogs, Toys, and Bumdais, and go home and drive the same.

What an unlikely juxtaposition: General Motors and Google (GOOG ) ("The man behind the Google doodle," Corporation, June 18) in back-to-back articles. The core message—and good news—is that artistic freedom can benefit any organization, whether it be considered leading-edge or lagging-edge.

Robert W. Keidel

Associate Professor of Management

LeBow College of Business Drexel University

Philadelphia

I just got a letter from your student of 101 in Business Management quoting that you leave your pant's zipper open for good or bad reasons.

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I expect most of it..

And as long as stupid people listen to other stupid people, it will keep on happening...

We are the land of the free, and home of the sheep. :scratchchin:

We let others make our decisions for us. Friends, the media.....

The best thing one can do is find out for themselves.

I took a co-worker to the local pontiac dealership, and had him test drive a G6.

His plans were to buy a Camry, but he actually drove out with the G6.

Was it perfect? No. But he loved the way it drove (sporty), and was going to be much cheaper than his Camry...

So you never know...

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Very interesting stories both at the thread's start and throughout the whole discussion! I think this thread shows how GM has to be consistent in delivering great prodcuct year after year so perceptions eventually turn around: it's the perfect example of an uphill battle.

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Very interesting stories both at the thread's start and throughout the whole discussion! I think this thread shows how GM has to be consistent in delivering great prodcuct year after year so perceptions eventually turn around: it's the perfect example of an uphill battle.

every week our dealership reminded us... that we sell cars daily... but people only buy them once every few years...

and if you're in the car market ready to trade in that 97 malibu for a 07 malibu... you might look at it and say... $h! this product sucks... hasnt really changed much... still looks the same... you might be able to see the mans point about product... cause the malibu is really the last bit of product prelutz... even though its been refreshed... the 08 malibu is really the end of the american revolution... lets see if we cant get another full revolution in less then 5 years this time...

the trailblazer needs to be redone or replaced... the colordo also... might help if they shared a platform

next generation lambda should use the zeta platform i think, either that or a nice profile car on the lambda platform...

GMT900 still has a good 4-5 years of good sales... the 2008 or 2009 year model should sell really well... i think 2002-2003 was the best years for the previous gmt800

equinox needs a replacement, hopefully will come hand in hand with the new vue...

impala is being replaced in a couple years...

aveo just got an update...

cobalt could use a refresh

corvette is always being improved

uplander needs to be replaced... hopefully the lambda will do that... i wonder if they can turn lambda into a van?

camaro coming out soon...

i think everything is either slated to be redesigned... or just got here...

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If Chevy wants something different, then its Lambda mobile as Newbie said should be a Minivan. That way GM can still make its presence felt in the Minivan market and at the same time take some away with the Buick, Saturn and GMC Lambdas.

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If Chevy wants something different, then its Lambda mobile as Newbie said should be a Minivan. That way GM can still make its presence felt in the Minivan market and at the same time take some away with the Buick, Saturn and GMC Lambdas.

i wonder if lambda is flexible at all? knowing gm's current platform designs it should be fairly flexible... but it would be nice if it could be a short wheel base platform and replace the equinox/torrent.... let saturns stay on with it.. but the equinox is... yuck...

but also like i said, stretch it a couple more inches and have a slidding door instead of a door an call it a mini van...

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well, those "ancient" engines put way more hp out then the horrid 144 hp "high tech" engine placed in the C-RV!

Camry's I-4 puts out 158 hp, Accord has 166...o snap...new bu only has 164...

the best is altima with 175 with sebring trailing it with 173.

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They know the problem, so they think they know the answer.

Yes, GM has needed to do a better job with a lot of things other than design, but that's not the point. Even if they do a better job with all of the functional/engineering/quality stuff, who's going to listen? A lot of people have already written off GM and won't be pursuaded by dull, boring tech facts. There has to be a compelling, emotional reason to consider them again. That's why design is so important at GM right now.

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