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AutoBlog: Dodge increases towing capacity of 2010 Ram on paper with no hardware changes

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Filed under: Truck, Work, Chrysler, Dodge

ram_towing.jpg

To paraphrase - Dodge: "Gosh, the Ram is even better than we thought." That's essentially the explanation given as to why the Ram's maximum towing capacity has been bumped from 9,100 pounds to 10,450 without any apparent hardware changes. Now fully coil-sprung, Chrysler initially said this new setup (as opposed to leaf springs) offers significantly better ride quality, and since research indicated that 80 percent of owners tow just 6,000 pounds or less, joining the fracas of half ton trucks that can drag around five tons or more wasn't the most important benchmark for the new Ram.

While the stated goal at the time of the new 2009 Ram's launch was to at least match what the previous Ram could do, another look at the latest SAE testing protocols for tow ratings suggested that more brawn had indeed been baked into the new truck. As such, a 2010 two-wheel drive longbed Ram with the 5.7-liter Hemi and 3.92 rear end gets a 1,500 pound bump in gross combined vehicle weight rating to 15,500 pounds. The Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) is the absolute maximum the truck is guaranteed to handle without damage - passengers, payload, trailer and all.

There are other detail changes for 2010, such as trailer-towing mirrors in manual or power specification, an efficiency tweak to the airdam, available iPod integration and 22-inch wheels, along with an engine management revision to eke some more efficiency out of the truck by shutting off fuel during deceleration.

[source: PickupTrucks.com]

Dodge increases towing capacity of 2010 Ram on paper with no hardware changes originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 29 Jul 2009 10:29:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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I'm not a Chrysler person, but this truck is a winner.

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anyone heard real life reports of how the suspension is holding up on these? If it's not failing, I expect we'll see some other truck builders follow suit on the rear suspension design.

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IL hasn't had any issues with the abilities of their Ram yet.

Maybe it was somthing in the pure Rocky Mountain spring water, but somewhere between Detroit and Los Angeles our long-term 2009 Dodge Ram 1500 managed to multiply. What left Motor City and a single Mopar arrived on the West Coast with another in tow.

A demanding trip considering the two mountain passes and triple-digit temps in-between, but the Ram shrugged it off, covering the 2,505 miles without incident and averaging a not-terrible 11.7 mpg.

Unladen across flat and (relatively cool) Middle America the Dodge's was running at 12.8 mpg while traveling at...er, "healthy" speeds according to Mr. Pund. Adding the 6,000-pound trailer, then scaling the Rockies and barreling through 100-plus desert heat (including a blast-furnace-like headwind) dropped fuel efficiency to 10.5 mpg between Denver and LA.

Dodge Ram Towing GTX in Arizona.JPG

The Ram actually got thirstier after crossing the mountain passes. Not sure how much of this was the heat, headwind or perhaps a slightly higher average speed as I got more comfortable with the idea of keeping those three tons in check. The Dodge genuinely felt unfazed in terms of acceleration, braking and handling, which only made it harder to maintain the proscribed 55-60 mph. Several times I glanced at the speedo and saw a figure considerably higher. Whoops!

Beyond the Ram's power and poise it's worth noting the level of comfort provided throughout this journey. For instance, the dual-zone climate control kept the large cabin cool, even when the exterior temp was reading 108 degrees. And despite it's somewhat brick-wall profile wind noise was never an issue, either while listeing to the audio system or utilizing the Bluetooth for hands-free phone calls.

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^that's nice, but I mean more like if parts are worn out by 50k, 100k, or what. Longevity. I know the suspension is performing well, that's why I expect that if it holds up well over time, the other manufacturers will be following suit.

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I imagine it would hold up, or it wouldn't have been designed the way it was. They're not going to design a truck that whose suspension would collapse in a few years. This isn't a Toyota after all. :P

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I imagine it would hold up, or it wouldn't have been designed the way it was. They're not going to design a truck that whose suspension would collapse in a few years. This isn't a Toyota after all. :P

I am hopeful, but also curious, since this is new territory. Never good to assume "it's new, so it must be good!" Though I would think that even if there are initial issues, they'll probably be able to fix them with minor design changes.

Edited by PurdueGuy
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