Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

Lutz says GM to build pure EV Volt

14 posts in this topic

Lutz says GM to build pure EV Volt

General Motors’ vice chairman, Bob Lutz, has been offering up quite a bit of new information lately – including the confirmation of a pure-EV Chevy Volt. Previously, the only publicly discussed Volt was a series hybrid that featured a gas engine generator to power the vehicle in EV mode.

GM has enjoyed a massive media love affair with its upcoming Chevy Volt production car – and for good reason. The Volt represents a big step forward by American automakers into the realm of cutting edge and high-tech offerings. American automakers have long received criticism for lagging behind their Japanese counterparts in terms of innovation, and more recently, with their lack of environmentally friendly options.

With the series hybrid Volt due to enter production in late 2010, and come to dealers near you in early 2011, GM’s Lutz has now suggested the possibility of a pure EV version of the Volt as well. According to Lutz, switching out the 1.4-liter gas generator for extra batteries would be “trivial.”

The idea of a pure EV version of the Volt may be very practical, and might be a perfect fit to face Nissan’s upcoming Leaf EV. The Volt in series hybrid form can only achieve 40 miles on a full charge (from batteries only) in optimal conditions, but the Nissan Leaf EV can go as far as 100 miles in similar conditions. This sales point may be reason enough for GM to make the “trivial” change to a pure EV Volt sooner, rather than later.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/lutz-says-gm-to-build-pure-ev-volt.html

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do it GM. I wonder what range the Volt would have just removing the gas engine & subsystems' weight, not adding any more batteries. Wonder what it'd cost too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has to burn Lutz a little. Nissan is building the pure EV that Lutz wanted to build but that GM decided was impossible.*

Now instead of people focusing on how GM has "leap frogged" Toyota, everyone is going to be talking about how Nissan has "leap frogged" everyone.

It looks like Nissan is pushing the "Zero Emissions" pretty hard. That is smart, because it seems to be the ultimate goal in this sector and is something GM can't claim.

*I don't believe that is a fair characterization, but it seems equivalent to the "Toyota said Li-Ion was impossible" garbage.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has to burn Lutz a little. Nissan is building the pure EV that Lutz wanted to build but that GM decided was impossible.*

Now instead of people focusing on how GM has "leap frogged" Toyota, everyone is going to be talking about how Nissan has "leap frogged" everyone.

It looks like Nissan is pushing the "Zero Emissions" pretty hard. That is smart, because it seems to be the ultimate goal in this sector and is something GM can't claim.

*I don't believe that is a fair characterization, but it seems equivalent to the "Toyota said Li-Ion was impossible" garbage.

Really? All the crap you pile on the Volt but you won't turn around & point out the numerous weak points of the Leaf? You crap on the Volt's pricing, but it looks like the Leaf won't be much better:

All Nissan will say right now is that the car will be priced affordably, and in the range of a well-equipped C-class sedan.

A well equipped C-class vehilce runs in the $28,000 to $35,000 range, without the $7500 tax credit the car will be expected to enjoy. If they are factoring that in, consider $35,500 to $42,500.

And that's WITHOUT a battery, which Nissan will lease. I understand & agree with leasing the battery, but for the same money, I'd take a Volt any day.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the majority of the country that lives away from water would refrain from the Leaf and any other pure electric due to the fact that the range is too limited.

The majority of us in the middle stated drive more than 100 in a day often. Also add into the mix we see temps below freezing for just under half the year.

We could live easy with the Volt but for the time being the batteries are just not there to provide the majority with a car we could live with.

The Prius and Volt give us a car we can enjoy the electric value when possible but also a car we could drive cross country in the deep part of winter non stop.

For most the part about getting there and back home is more important than Zero emissions.

Since GM has a car already that can be converted to full electric it is a smart move. For Nisan to build a full electrc that has no be plan at -10 degrees I find it a little short sighted for those out side Phoenix and San Deigo. Nissian is ust looking for headlines since they are behind in the type of car we all could use and not a select few. They in my view have the cart before the horse till better more affordable batteries are discovered.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really? All the crap you pile on the Volt but you won't turn around & point out the numerous weak points of the Leaf? You crap on the Volt's pricing, but it looks like the Leaf won't be much better:

And that's WITHOUT a battery, which Nissan will lease. I understand & agree with leasing the battery, but for the same money, I'd take a Volt any day.

What C-class sedan are you looking at? A well-equipped Focus, Astra, or Golf costs at most $25K.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way I read it, I thought they meant Mercedes C-Class

That's how I read it...I usually read/hear 'C-segment' or 'B-segment' to refer to the category, rather than '*-Class'...I read 'C-Class' as referring to the Mercedes line, though the quoted prices seem pretty low for a current C-Class.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how much credence I'd give to that blog... but a Nissan press release says:

"Pricing details will be announced closer to start of sales in late 2010; however, the company expects the car to be competitively priced in the range of a well-equipped C-segment vehicle."

http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/NEWS/2009/_STORY/090802-02-e.html

Then it sounds like the site I found (was just the first one that came up when I google'd "nissan leaf pricing") probably confused C-segment with C-class. If the Leaf is going to be under $25k, and the lease for the battery is reasonable, and it lives up to or exceeds the company predictions, and doesn't have it's range turn worthless in colder weather, and is nice enough to use daily, I could easily see it becoming a fairly popular 2nd or 3rd car for commuting. I still stand by that an all-electric car can't come near to being a first/primary car for more than 1% of the population.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool, but still not for me. Hope it helps boost GM's "green" image, especially considering hopefully some more RWD Zeta cars are coming down the line.

Edited by gm4life
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool, but still not for me. Hope it helps boost GM's "green" image, especially considering hopefully some more RWD Zeta cars are coming down the line.

Yes, I hope Chevy is able to sell lots of small FWD generics (Spark, Aveo, Cruze, Volt) to the mass market so they can still build some RWD cars for enthusiasts (Camaro SS, Corvettes, Zeta 'SS', etc).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then it sounds like the site I found (was just the first one that came up when I google'd "nissan leaf pricing") probably confused C-segment with C-class. If the Leaf is going to be under $25k, and the lease for the battery is reasonable, and it lives up to or exceeds the company predictions, and doesn't have it's range turn worthless in colder weather, and is nice enough to use daily, I could easily see it becoming a fairly popular 2nd or 3rd car for commuting. I still stand by that an all-electric car can't come near to being a first/primary car for more than 1% of the population.

I would expect it to be way under $25K without the battery. Well equipped compacts (i.e. C-segment) cars cost under $20K. And I think that makes sense... we should expect that an electric car's drive train (without the battery) would be much cheaper than an ICE drive train.

I think your 1% is WAY low. Certainly an all-electric can't currently be a single car for all people, but since the Leaf gets 2-2.5 times the range of what GM tells us ~80% of the US population requires for daily commutes it should be fine for most everyone most of the time (for the $20K difference you can rent a car for your few weekend vacations). And for people who are in families (which I suspect is the majority in the US, but I could be wrong), I understand that most US families do have 2 or 3 cars. Given the choice between a single $40K Volt or a $20K leaf and a $20K Versa, I think most families will find the two cars the more appealing option.

In context of the average US citizen, I would think that the $40,000ish price of the Volt would be a more limiting factor for adoption than the range of an EV.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0