Jump to content
NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

All hail the cartridge filter! 2011 Chevrolet Cruze makes changing oil a breeze

Recommended Posts

All hail the cartridge filter! 2011 Chevrolet Cruze makes changing oil a breeze

by Sam Abuelsamid (RSS feed) on May 13th 2010 at 7:00AM

Anyone that's ever done their own oil changes is familiar with the joys (or, ya know, not) of trying to access and then remove the filters on their engines. If you do manage to get it loose, there is the inevitable mess of oil dripping down your arm as you spin the filter off.

When the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze goes on sale later this year, both engines for the first time will feature a cartridge type filter that can be removed from above with almost no muss or fuss. Cartridge filters are basically just the internal paper element from traditional filters and they drop into a housing that's integrated into the cylinder block. GM has been using the same type of filter on the 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4-liter Ecotec engines for several years.

Besides being easier to change and tidier, they are also more environmentally friendly. There is less material from the filter itself to dispose of or recycle and any oil that spills with old-fashion filters often ends up in the local water supply. Also, having the cover with its seal on the top of the filter makes it far less prone to leaks that mess up your driveway. All hail the cartridge filter!

2011 Chevrolet Cruze Engines Use Eco-friendly Cartridge Oil Filter

2010-05-10

The 2011 Chevrolet Cruze will make proper oil filter disposal and recycling easier. The Ecotec 1.4L turbo and 1.8L four-cylinder engines will use a cartridge style oil filter which is easier to recycle and service compared to the conventional steel canister-style oil filters.

Recycling canister style filters requires that the metal housing and other elements, like the rubber seal, be cut away or separated, whereas the compact cartridge style is made of only paper and plastic. Because of this, proper disposal of the oil filter is easier for recycling centers.

Another benefit of the cartridge-style filter is that it can be changed easily and is virtually drip free from the top of the vehicle. This lessens the chance of oil dripping to the ground or driveway and possibly making its way into the water system when performing oil changes.

The housing for the cartridge-style filter is part of the engine and reused for the life of the engine. It never needs replacing. The housing also has a screw-on replaceable cap that eliminates the conventional canister-to-engine mating surface that is a potential source of leaks.

To find out more on how and where to properly recycle oil filters go to www.filtercouncil.org.

link:

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/05/13/all-hail-the-cartridge-filter-2011-chevrolet-cruze-makes-changi/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See? Same type of filter that's been used with great success for a while. Those of you worrying about sludging issues and leaks can quit worrying so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 3.6 in the Cadillac has a cartridge filter. They are expensive and you need a HUGE socket to get it off.

It's like $4.50 and uses a 1 inch socket. Time to upgrade from your Martha Stewart tool kit to something more manly.....

but it's a Cadillac... why are you not paying someone to change the oil for you in the first place...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah the Camaro's 3.6 has a cartridge filter. Best oil filter design ever.

Chrysler's new Pentastar V6 has the same thing, a cartridge mounted on top of the engine where it is easy access.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's like $4.50 and uses a 1 inch socket. Time to upgrade from your Martha Stewart tool kit to something more manly.....

but it's a Cadillac... why are you not paying someone to change the oil for you in the first place...

Or any vehicle, for that matter...I couldn't imagine changing the oil myself--tedious and messy, and then you have to find a place to dump the oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happens if it doesn't work after installing the cartridge? Would we have to blow into the assembly, and into the cartridge for good measure?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happens if it doesn't work after installing the cartridge? Would we have to blow into the assembly, and into the cartridge for good measure?

Why wouldn't it work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What happens if it doesn't work after installing the cartridge? Would we have to blow into the assembly, and into the cartridge for good measure?

Why wouldn't it work?

Old school Nintendo joke... nothing to do with the Cruze.

Sometimes it helps to spit in the cartridge. How else can I get ExciteBike to work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's like $4.50 and uses a 1 inch socket. Time to upgrade from your Martha Stewart tool kit to something more manly.....

but it's a Cadillac... why are you not paying someone to change the oil for you in the first place...

More like 10 bucks and my friend who works on cars regularly didn't have the socket in his set so we had to by it. It was like a 23mm socket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More like 10 bucks and my friend who works on cars regularly didn't have the socket in his set so we had to by it. It was like a 23mm socket.

just priced it on Advanced Auto for $4.50... 23mm is a 7/8ths socket....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one on my 2.0 is very easy to change.

I got the special socket from the Snap On guy and I get the filters through works so they are only something like $4.00 for me.

GM did something similar in the past with a filter on the old 2.5 in the late 80's, It was a filter that went in with the drain plug into the pan.

But the earliest cars I have worked that used this set up was on a 1938 Ford. It was a can that the dealer would install on the flat head and you used a filter. In the past some people I heard used a roll of toilet paper. I can't imagine that was fun to remove.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is this news? These filters have been around for at least 5 years.

Five years you say ............ wow who would have known. I would have thought at least seven, or maybe 50.

Edited by RjION

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is both good and bad.

Good because it is easier to change due to accessibility from the top side and because it is marginally cheaper to build (which can translate to lower filter prices).

Bad because it prevents aftermarket filter makers from incorporating additional features like a bypass valve within the filter itself. This are sometimes required to extend change intervals (safely) beyond what factory recommends. For the most parts, oil quality analysis have shown that modern synthetic oils have additive packages that are good for 10,000~25,000 miles. However, additional factors limit change intervals -- the possibility of oil usage and hence reduced levels over time, and clogged filters starving the engine of proper lubrication pressure. The former can be tackled with oil level sensors in an engine or via checking the dipstick once in a while. The latter -- which can be worse in high quality filters with ~99% filtration efficiencies -- can be handled with a bypass valve that pops open if the filter gets clogged -- dirty oil is better than compromised oil flow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems to me it'd just make extended oil changes easier by allowing easy filter change without losing a lot of oil. You don't really want a situation where the filter gets bypassed anyway. If the oil's good for 25k but the filter's only good for 5k, pop the cap & swap the cartridge every 5k, piece of cake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

an oil bypass can't be built into the system?

Technically, they can design it in. But, it usually isn't and a cartridge style system means you cannot add it.

Yes, you can also change the filter every 5000 ~ 1000 miles while keeping the oil. But bypass serves as an idiot prove measure, relying on good discipline doesn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We  Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×