Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
NewsFeeder

Mercedes-Benz inches closer to fully automated driving

Recommended Posts

Filed under: Safety, Technology, Mercedes-Benz

Benz
Mercedes-Benz automated test driver setup - Click above for high-res image gallery

Working on autonomous vehicle systems is all the rage lately, and Mercedes-Benz is no exception. Most of the work has been going within research groups and as part of competitions like the DARPA Urban Challenge. Mercedes-Benz has moved its automated driving work over to driver-assistance test groups. It's using the automation technology to evaluate crash avoidance systems without putting test drivers and engineers at risk.

By using its autopilot systems, the test maneuvers can be reproduced much more consistently. This isn't the first time that such systems have been employed in testing. Chrysler built an Automated Durability Road (ADR) at its Chelsea Proving Ground in the mid-1990s. The ADR used robotic drivers for accelerated durability testing over extremely difficult surfaces.

In both cases, the automakers can do far more extreme testing than would be possible with human drivers. Among the things Mercedes will be testing for is unintentional airbag deployments when driving over curbs, and detection of high-speed merging traffic or sudden braking.



[source: Mercedes-Benz]

Continue reading Mercedes-Benz inches closer to fully automated driving

Mercedes-Benz inches closer to fully automated driving originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 16 May 2010 17:26:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments

di
di

autoblog?i=1u-lNpNhNrs:xRrHnKpHdrM:wF9xT autoblog?i=1u-lNpNhNrs:xRrHnKpHdrM:V_sGL
1u-lNpNhNrs

View the full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't wait until the steering wheel & brake/gas pedals are removed entirely, and the front & RR seats face each other.... you know; like in a railroad car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Automated driving" is an oxymoron. If this is the future, I'll stay right here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While the promise of few car accidents, and faster commuting are great, the risk of computational flaws that'd make Toyota's unintended acceleration look like mere antics is off-putting to say the least. Not to mention the possibility of hackers gaining access to the drivetrain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If MB implements this, BMW is going to be FORCED to reply (witness FWD BMWs)- and finally BMW will have to relinquish their lifted-from-Pontiac tagline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, Control Specimen. Some of us are... driving enthusiasts. What is the use in purchasing a personal-use vehicle if all you're doing is sitting there? Might as well take a bus or train.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, you guys are a bunch of Luddites.

On the contrary. I'm currently typing this on an AMD 790FX based system with a Phenom 955 clocked at 3.8Ghz plugged in with two SSD's and a software RAID. Everything is cached on my RAMDisk. :P

Thing is, I've done my limited share of programming, as well as plenty of interaction with computers; despite software being infallible, human error in coding makes all the difference. Putting all our faith into a system that will regulate speed, turns and anything to do with driving will be fine for the majority of the time, but there's always that 'what if' question. What if in a rare circumstance that the vehicle does two things at once, and something goes awry? What if a kid with time on his hands, or a fundamentalist with an axe to grind finds a way to hack into an entire system of linked transportation? As it stands, industries have plunged into new technologies, and leave behind gaping holes in security; I worry the same exact thing will happen with cars. It's only after the fact that the loose ends are tied up, and even then, that's not enough.

These issues will never be solved, despite the best efforts of programmers, and that presents a problem for me. People will get too comfortable from doing 'nothing' while driving, and if something bad arises, then they'll either be incapable of avoiding the problem, or even prevented by the computer from doing so.

I think, at least for the moment, automakers should spend money helping to educate drivers, however possible. Let's make the drivers the safest, most attentive ever. Once that time has come, then consider automating traffic.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imagine if this were a thread predicting the coming technology of autopilot on commercial jetliners?

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imagine if this were a thread predicting the coming technology of autopilot on commercial jetliners?

And who knows how many problems with auto-pilot have occurred and have been remedied?

With a jetliner, you have trained professionals who are manning the helm. With automobiles, you have yakkety Yolanda on her cellphone, or baked-out Barry who's just stumbled out of a kegger. I know these people are the ones programmers and companies have in mind when it comes to automating transport, but I feel if something goes wrong, the consequences could be pretty bad if the vehicles require driver input. What happens with drinking and driving regulations? Will they be loosened, only to have a drunk guy slam his car into a wall because 'autopilot' kicked out for some reason?

Let's train drivers first, and ramp up licensing requirements, instead of stupefying driving even more. I'm not against automation, but I do feel that there needs to be a focus on more education, instead of throwing technology at our problems. At the end of the day, I can only hope for a happy medium.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We  Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×