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johnnyangelb

Ford Invents Hybrid that is *300% more efficient*

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Ford Invents Hybrid that is *300% more efficient* than Toyota Prius

---Ford is developing a new form of automotive propulsion, and the implications for the American Auto Industry are huge. The Hydraulic Hybrid could be the greatest innovation since the internal combustion engine itself, and Ford is on the inside track with its F-150 Hybrid. New Tech Spy Has learned details about the system that are simply amazing and could put Ford in a commanding position in the fiercely competitive full size pickup market.

---The Idea behind the current crop of Hybrid cars is well known; the cars main energy comes from gasoline which recharges batteries that move the car at low speeds. Hydraulic Hybrids work in the same manner, only instead of batteries, excess energy is stored in hydraulic cylinders.That in itself is not revolutionary, except for the fact that Nickel Metal Hydride batteries used today are not an efficient way to store energy, and hydraulic storage blows them away with 3X the efficiency. Even next generation Lithium Ion batteries do not come close to Hydraulic Energy Storage.

........ full article at:

http://www.newtechspy.com/articles06/hydraulichybrid.html

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The standard F-150 has a curb weight of about 4800 lbs., which is 65% greater than theToyota Prius, yet incredibly the Hydraulic F-150 with a continuously variable transmission matches the Prius with 60mpg city rating, that’s an amazing 400% increase over its gasoline version.

Holy s***. If this actually happens soon, this might save Ford. I wonder what the rumored Tundra hybrid will get?

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I did a little more research and found this article that goes hand-in-hand with the one posted. They seem to imply that this technology would be distributed among only American auto manufacturers since the EPA owns the patent. This could be great for the American auto industry.

EPA turns innovator with hydraulic hybrid

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toyota's biggest achievement in the world is to copy everything so i am sure they find a way to copy this and market the hell out of it

toyota is so good at copying runor has it they are in on human cloning too

Edited by regfootball

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Wow- impressive! I would think that the huge jump in city MPG would more than offset the slightly lower highway MPG- it unquestionably would for me. And no worries about battery life, replacement ocst or high voltage.

Indeed; who knew the EPA did any real engineering?

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The first article sounds like 90% assumptions. The article mustang linked to sounds much more legit, and doesn't claim anything about a Ford 60mpg truck - they say Ford is in a "wait & see" mode, and that the technology will show up first in UPS delivery trucks and a small fleet of grabage trucks.

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The first article sounds like 90% assumptions.  The article mustang linked to sounds much more legit, and doesn't claim anything about a Ford 60mpg truck - they say Ford is in a "wait & see" mode, and that the technology will show up first in UPS delivery trucks and a small fleet of grabage trucks.

I agree

If the F150 could get 60mpg with this technology, Ford would do no waiting. Ford would be rushing development as fast as they could.

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