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NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

Next Corvette to Get All-New Small-Block

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Next Corvette to Get All-New Small-Block

C7 will Debut with GM's latest V-8

From the August, 2010 issue of Motor Trend / By Mike Connor

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According to sources inside GM, the C7 Corvette will be one of the first cars fitted with the next-generation small-block V-8 GM has announced it is investing $890 million to develop and manufacture.

GM has confirmed the new small-block V-8s will feature aluminum blocks and heads, direct injection, and a new combustion system. Our sources say the C7 engine will displace 5.5 liters, with a target output of about 440 horsepower.

The new small-block will retain a traditional overhead-valve layout, ensuring compact dimensions and lower manufacturing costs. Prototype engines reportedly are already running on test beds in Detroit.

Read more: http://www.motortrend.com/features/auto_news/2010/1008_corvette_to_get_all_new_small_block/index.html#ixzz0sAfG4AP8

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CHEVROLET CORVETTE C7 TO FEATURE 5.5L V8

By Drew Johnson

Seemingly confirming one of the worst kept secrets in the industry, a General Motors insider has revealed that the next-generation Chevrolet Corvette will be one of the first road-going vehicles to feature GM’s new 5.5L V8.

According to one of Motor Trend’s inside sources, the Corvette C7 will come equipped with GM’s new 5.5L small block V8. The new mill will feature a number of technical advancements — including direct-injection and a new combustion system – but will retain its old school overhead valve design to cut costs and keep the engine compact.

Power for the new engine will likely total 440 horsepower, which would be a slight improvement over the 436 horsepower currently available in the C6 Corvette. However, thanks to the 5.5L’s smaller size and its advanced features, expect a noticeable jump in overall fuel economy – improving on the C6’s already impressive 26mpg highway rating.

Chevy’s new 5.5L has already made its world debut, appearing between the fenders of the C6.R racecar. GM has also committed $890 million to develop and produce the new small block. Expect to see the C7 Corvette in 2012.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/chevrolet-corvette-c7-to-feature-5-5l-v8.html

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CHEVROLET CORVETTE C7 TO FEATURE 5.5L V8

By Drew Johnson

Seemingly confirming one of the worst kept secrets in the industry, a General Motors insider has revealed that the next-generation Chevrolet Corvette will be one of the first road-going vehicles to feature GM’s new 5.5L V8.

According to one of Motor Trend’s inside sources, the Corvette C7 will come equipped with GM’s new 5.5L small block V8. The new mill will feature a number of technical advancements — including direct-injection and a new combustion system – but will retain its old school overhead valve design to cut costs and keep the engine compact.

Power for the new engine will likely total 440 horsepower, which would be a slight improvement over the 436 horsepower currently available in the C6 Corvette. However, thanks to the 5.5L’s smaller size and its advanced features, expect a noticeable jump in overall fuel economy – improving on the C6’s already impressive 26mpg highway rating.

Chevy’s new 5.5L has already made its world debut, appearing between the fenders of the C6.R racecar. GM has also committed $890 million to develop and produce the new small block. Expect to see the C7 Corvette in 2012.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/chevrolet-corvette-c7-to-feature-5-5l-v8.html

At the beginning of the year, I share their opinion. However, I am no longer convinced that there is any indication that the production Corvette engine will be 5.5 liters.

The new engine for the C6R race car is indeed 5.5 liters, but that is forced upon the team by the new GT2 class regulations that stipulated a maximum displacement of 5.5 liters. The race engine also lacks Direct Injection, again due to class regulations. Even if this engine is to share the new Small Block's engine block it does not give an indication as to the production engine's displacement.

From a fuel economy standpoint, keeping the cylinder count, bore size and valve train components, while reducing the stroke does not yield significant benefits in fuel economy. In fact, it can sometimes make it worse by pushing the torque curve to the right and thereby increasing the cruise state throttle position.

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>>"The new small-block will retain a traditional overhead-valve layout..."<<

In this age of instant information, you'd think this outmoded descriptor would have died decades ago.

ALL mainstream automotive engines built today are "overhead valve", both OHC and IBC.

As someone who both knows & owns a non-overhead valve IBC V-8, this is so irksome.

Edited by balthazar

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The Race engine in the GT2 cars last fall was 5.5 and it did have DI on it at the race I was at. They only removed it till it becomes production to make it legal once again.

It did hurt the race engine a little on power and Fuel use. Pratt and Miller tried to fight it but they lost in the end after only a couple of races. As soon as the new DI engine is back it will add the DI ASAP to the race engines. GM is doing the work on the engines for P & M.

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>>"The new small-block will retain a traditional overhead-valve layout..."<<

In this age of instant information, you'd think this outmoded descriptor would have died decades ago.

ALL mainstream automotive engines built today are "overhead valve", both OHC and IBC.

As someone who both knows & owns a non-overhead valve IBC V-8, this is so irksome.

Well, 'IBC' hasn't caught on... 'pushrod' remains the most common descriptor.

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Well, 'IBC' hasn't caught on... 'pushrod' remains the most common descriptor.

Well... the whole "OHV" thing dates back to ancient times when there are two kinds of IBC V8es. Those that have the pushrods operate upward facing poppets having L-shaped combustion chambers and those who use a rocker to turn the valves 90 degrees so they are on top of the cylinders. The former being a Ford Flathead. The later being termed "OHV".

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^ Don't you mean 'turn the valves 180 degrees' ? ;)

Of course that's correct: 'OHV' is the term for 'valves overhead of the combustion chamber', specifically as opposed to the flathead design.

To still call an IBC engine "OHV" is erroneous as a descriptor vs. OHC.

LONG overdue for correction, one I'm pledging to use correctly from now on.

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^ Don't you mean 'turn the valves 180 degrees' ? ;)

Of course that's correct: 'OHV' is the term for 'valves overhead of the combustion chamber', specifically as opposed to the flathead design.

To still call an IBC engine "OHV" is erroneous as a descriptor vs. OHC.

LONG overdue for correction, one I'm pledging to use correctly from now on.

Yes, I meant 180 deg.

It is not incorrect to call an IBC engine OHV. It is.

The problem is that DOHC describes the number and location of the camshafts, whereas OHV describes the location and orientation of valves. The two has nothing are neither directly related nor mutually exclusive. It is like saying "traverse engine" vs "tire driven"; regardless of the orientation of the engine I guess most cars are still tire driven, and being tire driven doesn't mean your engine as to face one direction or another.

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We agree- I'm sure you noted I said 'as a decriptor vs. OHC' - there it's usage is as your 'tranverse / tire-driven' analogy says: unrelated.

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The Race engine in the GT2 cars last fall was 5.5 and it did have DI on it at the race I was at. They only removed it till it becomes production to make it legal once again.

It did hurt the race engine a little on power and Fuel use. Pratt and Miller tried to fight it but they lost in the end after only a couple of races. As soon as the new DI engine is back it will add the DI ASAP to the race engines. GM is doing the work on the engines for P & M.

OK, back to the topic at hand...

What I meant was that I have seen no indication on the displacement of the production small blocks. The racing engines simply have to use the production blocks. The ycan, and usually do, utilize custom cranks and pistons to comply with class displacement regulations. That the racing engine is a certain displacement does not mean the production engines will be of a similar displacement.

We don't know if the production small block will be 5.5 liters or 6.2 liters or some other displacement. Heck, we don't even know if there will be multiple displacements like with the Gen IV engines (4.8, 5.3, 6.0, 6.2) or if GM will standardize on one. All we know is that there is a new aluminum block which has a high mounted in-block cam for reduced valve train mass and it is Direct Injection ready. Unless GM goes backwards on their architecture, we can also guess that the new engine will be capable of variable valve timing and cylinder deactivation like some of today's Gen IV engines.

That's all for now... and it's all good.

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