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BREAKING: 10,000 Chevrolet Volts in 2011, 30,000 in 2012

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BREAKING: 10,000 Chevrolet Volts in 2011, 30,000 in 2012

by Sam Abuelsamid (RSS feed) on Jul 1st 2010 at 4:29PM

During a live video webchat this afternoon, Tony DiSalle, marketing director for the Chevrolet Volt, announced the production volumes for the first two years. General Motors plans to build 10,000 Volts by the end of the 2011 calendar year, with another 30,000 units coming in 2012. There will be a relatively slow production ramp up during the first year as the automaker learns to build the Volt as well as well as picking up lessons from cars in the field.

Chevrolet dealers will have to meet some minimum qualifications in order to sell the Volt. For instance, every dealer authorized to sell the Volt will have to maintain at least one demonstrator vehicle in stock so that potential customers can test drive it. Those same dealers will also have to install a 240 volt home charging station so that the cars have a full battery and customers can try it out. Beyond the dealers that sell Volts in the initial retail markets, GM will also assign dealers in other parts of the country to service the Volt if needed.

Unlike the Nissan Leaf, customers will not have to get pre-qualified to buy a Volt by having access to 240 volt home charging. Anyone can walk into a Volt authorized dealer and buy one (assuming they have the money!) even if they live in an apartment. Of course, getting the most out of a Volt will require access to a plug, but that is the customers' choice.

link:

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/07/01/breaking-10-000-chevrolet-volts-in-2011-30-000-in-2012/

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Smart move.

Slow start up will give them time to work out any bugs with the car or the sales network before they get out of hand.

Also no matter what the sales this will help create demand for the car that will look good for marketing.

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Smart move.

Slow start up will give them time to work out any bugs with the car or the sales network before they get out of hand.

Also no matter what the sales this will help create demand for the car that will look good for marketing.

I've got different spin for you. The Volt is going to come out and be test driven, and it isn't going to show well.

It will get ~32 miles electric on average (as per the EPA), but will get in the low 20's in enough situations (as per GM's admissions of cold weather performance) that it will be widely maligned.

We now know that it will get up to 33.3MPG ICE (as per GM's 9 gallon gas tank size and the up to 300 mile range on ICE), so that means a lot of people are going to drive it and get in the high 20's MPG. That will be compared to other cars which get high 40's and low 50's for much less money.

After telling us that it drives like a 250 HP V6, test drives will show 0-60 times on part with 4cyl cars, and 50-70 times and 1/4 mile times slower than 4cyl cars.

All of this will be compared to the 230 MPG that GM was advertising and the relatively high price of the Volt.

The reason why GM is going slow is because not only are the losing money on each Volt, they know very well that virtually every consumer out there has a better choice of car than the Volt. Early adopter Volt cheerleaders can only take them so far. I think they are hoping that Volt V2 will address the shortcomings of V1, but the reality is that to address the failings of the Volt design they are likely going to have to make it operate a lot more like the Prius, which is really going to ruin the "leapfrog" that GM has been pretending to have made. Plus the tax rebates are set to go away after a certain number of units sold, so therefore the Volt is actually likely to get MORE expensive with time.

The back drop to all this will be Nissan's Leaf.... high volume, good price, and NO emissions. This could end up looking very bad for GM.

Edited by GXT
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I've got different spin for you. The Volt is going to come out and be test driven, and it isn't going to show well.

It will get ~32 miles electric on average (as per the EPA), but will get in the low 20's in enough situations (as per GM's admissions of cold weather performance) that it will be widely maligned.

We now know that it will get up to 33.3MPG ICE (as per GM's 9 gallon gas tank size and the up to 300 mile range on ICE), so that means a lot of people are going to drive it and get in the high 20's MPG. That will be compared to other cars which get high 40's and low 50's for much less money.

After telling us that it drives like a 250 HP V6, test drives will show 0-60 times on part with 4cyl cars, and 50-70 times and 1/4 mile times slower than 4cyl cars.

All of this will be compared to the 230 MPG that GM was advertising and the relatively high price of the Volt.

The reason why GM is going slow is because not only are the losing money on each Volt, they know very well that virtually every consumer out there has a better choice of car than the Volt. Early adopter Volt cheerleaders can only take them so far. I think they are hoping that Volt V2 will address the shortcomings of V1, but the reality is that to address the failings of the Volt design they are likely going to have to make it operate a lot more like the Prius, which is really going to ruin the "leapfrog" that GM has been pretending to have made. Plus the tax rebates are set to go away after a certain number of units sold, so therefore the Volt is actually likely to get MORE expensive with time.

The back drop to all this will be Nissan's Leaf.... high volume, good price, and NO emissions. This could end up looking very bad for GM.

Well lets take a look here.

MPG on gas will be as good as he Cruze and they are shooting for 40 MPG.

Electric range so far GM is holding solid on the claims. I expect they will hit the target.

As for power... If you have driven a car powered by electric motors you know that normal driving is good do to instant torque. The engine will kick in on demand cases. So far those who have driven this car have not complained of performance on or off gas. I spent time in the Hydrogen Nox Chevy has. It runs on similar electric motors and performs well for a very heavy vehicle. Either way anyone who buys this car is not a racer and all reports say if it was not so quiet it would feel and drive like a normal car. That has been the point of this car. It is to be normal but with the bonus of having electric on the short daily runs.

As for range. That is straight trough driving. This car is made for the guy driving to work and home. This could be on electric for months for the average driver.

As for the Leaf the deal killer for most will be the fact that once it is dead it is dead and it will be a car that just can't leave town. The Volt could do the Cleveland to Columbus run or San Diego to LA run in one day. The leaf well if you can plug it in at Disney Land you might make it home. It is a comuter with no options.

The Volt on GM;s part will not set any sales records. They have always kept it on a short leash. It is the first step to establish a new way to drive, build and sell a car. In time they will improve in all areas once it is on the market. If they had never built this car it would never improve. THe Chicken and Egg deal.

The Volt will do what it needs to do. It is only the start of the adventure not the end.

Well see who is correct here soon.

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GM plans to build 10,000 Volts next year

Chrissie Thompson July 2, 2010 06:01 CET

General Motors Co. will build 10,000 Chevrolet Volts by the end of 2011 and 30,000 more in 2012, said Tony DiSalle, marketing director for the Volt.

The Volt plug-in electric vehicle, expected to be launched in October or November, will initially go on sale in the United States in Austin, Texas, and New York City, CEO Ed Whitacre said Thursday in Austin. That's in addition to Michigan, California and Washington, D.C., which GM had announced previously. GM also said it will expand its launch markets early in 2011 to include the rest of Texas and New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

GM will add more markets halfway through 2011, DiSalle said today during a Web chat. GM will sell the Volt in all 50 states within 12 to 18 months of launch, he said. The Volt also will enter Canada in 2011.

GM is looking to the Volt to help improve its image. The first generation is not expected to make a profit, although GM has not released pricing.

To sell the Volt, dealers will have to agree to keep a Volt demo, install a couple of 240-volt charging units at their stores, buy special tools and certify Volt specialists on their sales and service staff, DiSalle said. Chevrolet also expects to certify a nationwide service network of dealers outside initial launch markets, he said.

He declined to give details about how many dealers will get the Volt. GM has begun the process of inviting dealers to become certified to sell or service the Volt, and it will assign launch-market allocations soon.

DiSalle acknowledged that GM expects to have more interested buyers than available Volts during the first model year. But he said GM will continue to advertise the Volt despite the anticipated shortages.

DiSalle said some Volt TV, print and Web advertising started today in New York and Texas.

Read more: http://www.autonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100702/COPY/307029972/1186#ixzz0sXPX1XOt

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Well lets take a look here.

MPG on gas will be as good as he Cruze and they are shooting for 40 MPG.

Why? You are ignoring the data that GM themselves have provided that indicates 33.3MPG. Even if you want to ignore that, at the VERY LEAST you have to consider that the Volt weighs some 400LBS more than the Cruze and has to suffer the conversion losses from going from gas to elec. There is no reason to believe it will match the Cruze highway MPG. It will likely beat the Cruze city MPG, but what does 30MPG amount to when compared to the competition at 50MPG? Or GM’s promise of 50MPG? This can only be viewed as a failure.

Electric range so far GM is holding solid on the claims. I expect they will hit the target.

I expect they will hit their target as well. But surely you have noticed that GM’s target of “up to 40 miles” when no HVAC and on ideal temperature days is so unrealistic for the average consumer that it is near meaningless. To take it to the extreme, why not just tell us the range when the Volt is dropped from a plane? The EPA numbers announced by GM amount to ~32 miles, and GM themselves admit HVAC can use AS MUCH energy as driving the car itself under certain conditions. The average person will not hit the 40 miles routinely, and enough people, especially with a release so close to winter, are going to be in the 20’s, that the range will appear a failure.

As for power... If you have driven a car powered by electric motors you know that normal driving is good do to instant torque. The engine will kick in on demand cases. So far those who have driven this car have not complained of performance on or off gas. I spent time in the Hydrogen Nox Chevy has. It runs on similar electric motors and performs well for a very heavy vehicle. Either way anyone who buys this car is not a racer and all reports say if it was not so quiet it would feel and drive like a normal car. That has been the point of this car. It is to be normal but with the bonus of having electric on the short daily runs.

At least one reporter has questioned the highway acceleration, and the 0-60 numbers from GM seem to back up that up. You just can't argue the numbers. 0-60 of a 4cyl car with V6 performance at the start means sub 4cyl performance at the end. GM themselves seem concerned as all the test drives seem to be in short, tight courses... I think they are all in parking lots… to keep the car in that electric motor sweet spot. Perhaps it will be acceptable in the end, but there will be enough ¼ mile drag races of horribly slow cars besting the Volt that GM’s “250HP V6” claims will be viewed with skepticism.

As for range. That is straight trough driving. This car is made for the guy driving to work and home. This could be on electric for months for the average driver.

As for the Leaf the deal killer for most will be the fact that once it is dead it is dead and it will be a car that just can't leave town. The Volt could do the Cleveland to Columbus run or San Diego to LA run in one day. The leaf well if you can plug it in at Disney Land you might make it home. It is a comuter with no options.

The Leaf will be better than the Volt for city-only purposes (less expensive, less maintenance, more electric range). That is the real market for these cars. For the routine highway drivers the Leaf is a non-starter, but neither is the Volt as they will be able to buy vehicles that get better highway fuel economy than the Volt for half the price.

That leaves the market you described of city drivers who happen to make the occasional highway trip. But I would further break down that group to only include people for whom the Volt is their only car (else they could take their second car for highway trips). Then you have to remove those people for which other cars still make more sense than the Volt (need a truck, minivan, have to haul, don't have 30K+ to spend on a car, drive so little city that a regular car would use less gas than the Volt, etc.).

The Volt market is a small one indeed.

The Volt on GM;s part will not set any sales records. They have always kept it on a short leash. It is the first step to establish a new way to drive, build and sell a car. In time they will improve in all areas once it is on the market. If they had never built this car it would never improve. THe Chicken and Egg deal.

The Volt will do what it needs to do. It is only the start of the adventure not the end.

Well see who is correct here soon.

Start of what? GM has admitted the drivetrain doesn't work in larger vehicles, doesn't fit into smaller vehicles, and doesn't make sense in luxury vehicles. The volume limit on the incentives means that for the foreseeable future the Volt is going to get MORE expensive with time (unless the incentives are extended, which likely means by definition that the volume of these cars is still unsustainably low). GM's publicly started shifting their focus back to parallel hybrids.

I think it is safe to argue that 2008 was the height of Voltec.

But I do agree that it did what it was intended to do, at least for a while. But longer term GM is still going to appear to have been outdone by the competition. They will be just as far behind the Japanese (Nissan specifically) in 2012 as they were in 2002. But in the meantime Ford will be ahead of GM.

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The Leaf and the Volt do not share a target market. The Leaf is only good as a secondary car. The Volt can be someone's only car.

I think you are incorrect on the following points:

1) They do share a target market. Anyone shopping for an electric vehicle WILL consider both.

2) There are some for which the Leaf will be a fine primary car.

Now I agree that the Volt could be someone's only car, and that the Volt has the Leaf beat in this regard. Of cours ICE cars and parallel hybrids have them both beat in this regard. But while the Volt may be OK for a lot of people, it won't be the best car for almost anyone. And being OK for a lot of people simply isn't good enough, because people don't buy what is OK for most people, they buy what is BEST for them.

The Leaf may not be an OK car for as many people as the Volt, but it does pass the Volt in the number of people for which it will be the BEST car. In the end, that is all that really matters for sales.

At the risk of a flawed analogy, a minivan is probably a vehicle that is OK for just about everyone. Yet there are any number of other categories of vehicles that outsell minivans because they are a BETTER vehicle for the person who bought it.

Edited by GXT

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I still think that the Volt is the "one giant leap" part of the next age of automobiles.

The Volt doesn't care how it gets it's electricity, just as long as it gets electricity. It carries a re-fuelible generator around with it. If the future demands that we go hydrogen, the Voltec is ready. If the future demands that we go 100% biofuel, the Voltec is ready. If there is a breakthrough in PV technology, the Voltec is ready.

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You my friend do are a glass half empty on this.

The Volt is not a end all do all car for everyone. The fact remains for many it will be a non gas used car for many who drive to work and back every day. I know my comute even with less range is more than covered.

The fact remains the system in the Volt will scare the average driver less than the Leaf. He knows when he buys this car it is a go anywhere car. The Leaf has limitations that just can't be over come with many people. To spend 30K and be told ok you can go 100 miles today and no more has little appeal in the mass public. Some are ok with that but not many.

As for the future the system as it is is not ready for larger cars. As thing develope now that cars like this are being built new ideas and items will come that will make this a better system and adaptable. NASA's first rocket just orbited the earth and it took some time but we did get to the moon. Same here as this will come in steps.

The market for this car is a odd one. The Prius unless driven carefully is not a wopper on MPG. But may people buy into the whole idea and it had created a market.

The whole Leaf to many normal people will see it and know they have limited miles and that just does not appeal. The Tree Huggers will just get their bikes out when the tow truck takes the car home if they over do it. The Volt owners will just pull into the gas station. There is enough of each group to sell these too.

Any of these cars are not going to save you much money. Many of the people who paid near 30K for a Prius will never see the return. The whole green thing has taken a generation and to me the green is cash and if GM can harvest it God Bless them.

One would be better off with a 17K Mini Cooper vs any of these cars that has never been any seceret. But some what these so let them have at it.

Edited by hyperv6

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