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GM prices Volt at $41,000, will tout EV as a ‘real car'

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GM prices Volt at $41,000, will tout EV as a ‘real car'

Chrissie Thompson July 27, 2010 - 12:01 am ET

UPDATED: 7/27/10 12:01 p.m. ET

DETROIT -- General Motors Co. has priced its Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid at $41,000, including a shipping fee, and plans to tell consumers that the cost covers a peace of mind that's missing from other electric vehicles.

The price of the Volt, which debuts in October or November, compares with the $32,780 that Nissan wants for its Leaf electric vehicle, which goes on sale in December. Buyers of both cars are eligible for a $7,500 federal tax credit.

GM says the Volt can travel as far as 40 miles on battery power before it switches to its gasoline-powered engine. The Leaf is an all-electric vehicle advertised as having an estimated 100-mile range before drivers need to recharge.

GM's research and its experience with the EV1 electric vehicle in the 1990s indicate that customers interested in electric vehicles also want the peace of mind provided by the Volt's onboard engine, U.S. marketing chief Joel Ewanick said today on a conference call with reporters.

“Our strategy will be, ‘It's more car than electric,' ” Ewanick said. “They're looking for a real car. They're looking for a car that will meet their transportation needs, that gives them no anxiety. …

“You can drive it across the country without having to recharge, and our competition can't do that.”

Competitive lease

Despite the Volt's higher suggested retail price, GM most often will lead Volt advertising with its lease deal -- $350 a month for 36 months after a $2,500 down payment, Ewanick said. That compares with the Leaf's $349 a month for 36 months after $1,999 down.

The Volt can offer a competitive lease because of high residual values stemming from outsized demand and the 8-year/100,000-mile warranty on its lithium ion battery system, said Ewanick, who left Nissan North America in May to join GM.

Read more: http://www.autonews.com/article/20100727/OEM/100729899/1186#ixzz0uts5W4Ld

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Chevrolet Volt to start at $41,000; lease option available, too

BY GREG GARDNER

FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER

The Chevrolet Volt will be priced at between $41,000 and $44,600, but an aggressive lease will enable consumers to get it for three years at $2,500 down and $350 a month.

The actual cost will be reduced for most consumers by a $7,500 tax credit.

The $41,000 car will include eight air bags and five years of OnStar navigation, roadside assistance and crash response service, and a 120-volt charge cord. The premium package will include leather heated seats, graphic door trim and a higher grade paint.

The first 4,400 buyers can choose to take part in a program that will install a 240-volt charging station at their home for free.

The price is about where most industry observers expected it, but the lease terms could put pressure on General Motors’ production plans – 10,000 Volts by the end of 2011 and 30,000 more in 2012.

“Remember we’re in the post- bank crash world,” said Jim Hall of 2952 Analytics in Birmingham. “Just because someone can afford the monthly payment doesn’t mean they will qualify to lease a $41,000 vehicle.”

When the long-awaited electric car goes on sale late this year, only about 600 Chevrolet dealers will offer it. Those dealers will be located in the launch markets of California, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Michigan, Washington, D.C., and Austin, Texas.

Joel Ewanick, GM vice president for U.S. marketing, said interested customers will be directed to www.getmyvolt.com where they can locate their nearest participating Chevrolet dealer, begin the purchase or lease process and track the vehicle from when the steel arrives at GM’s Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant until it rolls off the line. Dealers will assign a Volt specialist to each customer who will be available by phone.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not certified the fuel economy rating for the Volt, which has a 16 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery and a 1.4-liter, four-cylinder gasoline engine. The Volt can travel 40 miles solely on battery power. The engine can provide another 300 miles before the car needs to be recharged.

Earlier this month, Tom Stephens, GM vice chairman for global product operations, said the EPA was studying the option of presenting multiple miles-per-gallon figures based on various lengths of trip.

Ewanick said the Volt’s advertising will emphasize, “it’s more car than electric. People are looking for a real car, a transportation means that gives them no anxiety.”

The Volt will go on sale about the same time as the Nissan Leaf, a smaller all-electric vehicle that Nissan says will get 100 miles between chargings.

Enterprise Rent-A-Car announced Tuesday it is buying 500 Leafs to offer in Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix, Tucson, Nashville and Knoxville.

link:

http://www.freep.com/article/20100727/BUSINESS01/100727019/1318/Volt-to-start-at-41000-lease-option-available-too

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Chevy Volt will cost $41,000 before tax rebate

12:00 PM

Finally, General Motors is willing to talk about price on the Chevy Volt.

The company just announced that the new Chevy Volt will be priced at $41,000 for a base model, which General Motors promises will be fairly well-equipped, and $44,600 fully-loaded. A $7,5000 federal tax rebate will be available to many customers.

The automaker will start taking orders today on its web site, www.getmyvolt.com, and sales will begin in certain regions later this year. The first state to get the Volt will be California, where buyers may get an additional $5,000 tax rebate.

"This is one of the most important days we've seen in a long time for General Motors," said Joel Ewanick, vice president of U.S. marketing for General Motors, who made the announcement at the Plug-In 2010 conference in San Jose, Calif. "It's been 1,297 days since the introduction of the Volt concept car, and every day since we've been asked a single question: How much is it going to cost?"

People who would prefer leasing can get the electrically-powered car for $350 a month on a 36-month lease, with a $2,500 down payment.

Many customers will qualify for a $7,500 rebate off their federal taxes for buying the vehicle, which will go 40 miles on battery power alone and then uses gas to power an electric generator for another 300 miles.

Over the first 18 months, the car will initially be available to Chevrolet customers in California, New York, Michigan, Connecticut, Texas, New Jersey and the Washington D.C. area. A nationwide rollout will start after that.

Ewanick says the automaker is packing even the base Volt full of premium content, including OnStar and the ability to connect with your car via a smartphone app.

The Chevrolet Volt will come standard with a 120-volt charge cord for charging from a standard home electrical outlet. Additionally,4,400 Volt buyers in launch markets could be eligible for a free 240-volt charging station, including home installation, if they qualify for a program developed by the U.S. Department of Energy.

link:

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/driveon/post/2010/07/chevy-volt-will-cost-41000-before-tax-rebate/1

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2011 Chevrolet Volt priced at $41,000* or $350/month for three-year lease

by Sam Abuelsamid (RSS feed) on Jul 27th 2010 at 12:00PM

General Motors' recently hired vice-president for sales and marketing Joel Ewanick took the stage at the Plug-In 2010 conference in San Jose, CA today and finally revealed that the 2011 Chevrolet Volt will have a base price of $41,000 (including a $720 destination charge) before federal and state tax incentives. While GM hasn't gone as aggressive as most people had hoped on the sticker price, the real deal appears to be the $350 per month for 36 months lease. That matches the monthly payment that Nissan is charging for the Leaf EV.

The effective purchase price of the Volt will be cut to $33,500 with a $7,500 federal tax credit (hence the asterisk in the title), but buyers will have to finance the $41,000 and get the credit back on their next tax return. Lease customers will have the credit factored in to their payment. The Volt lease requires a $2,500 down payment (vs $2,000 for the Leaf), but GM is including a clause in the lease contract that allows leasers to buy the car at the end of their term so that the automaker don't have another standoff with customers like it did with the all-electric EV1. Follow the jump to learn more about the Volt's price and how the order process will go, but first take our informal poll below.

link:

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/07/27/2011-chevrolet-volt-priced-at-41-000-or-350-month-for-3-year-lease/

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2011 CHEVROLET VOLT

OFFICIAL IMAGESCHEVROLET VOLT POWERTRAIN

By Andrew Ganz

Got $41,000 or $350 per month? Chevrolet says that it will begin taking orders from dealers in selected markets effective immediately for its Volt extended-range EV.

The Volt’s $41,000 base price, also announced today, is about $10,000 more than the automaker initially estimated the car would cost when it was first announced several years ago. It’s also about $8,000 more than the base price of a Nissan Leaf EV – although the Volt has the added benefit of a gasoline backup engine to allow for extended road trips of any length and it comes with more standard luxury-level features. Both the Volt and the Leaf qualify for up to $7,500 in federal income tax credits.

Chevrolet says that dealers in several major markets – California, Texas, Michigan the New York City area (including suburban New Jersey and Connecticut) and the Washington, D.C., area (including suburban Maryland and Virginia) – will be able to take orders for prospective customers later today.

The biggest news for most buyers, however, is that Chevrolet will begin leasing the Volt for $350 a month, effectively matching Nissan’s $349 monthly lease. The Volt’s lease requires a reasonable $2,500 down including a security deposit. Many analysts have said that EV and extended-range EV sales will initially need to rely heavily on leases as buyers are wary about the long-term cost of operation.

Interior layout

GM’s bread and butter brand created a video that previews the many features of the Volt’s dual-screen interior layout.

This video not only shows just how customers will be able to interact with the Volt’s touch-screen in the center of the dash, but also how information will be displayed in the gauges, and even how owners will be able to access and control some aspects of the vehicle from their mobile phone.

The General hopes to have the Volt, which is based on GM’s Delta/Global Compact Car Architecture platform, on sale in late 2010 as a 2011MY model. Early production will likely be extremely limited, but the latest video indicates the Volt will make its late 2010 launch date.

Thanks to a number of federal and local incentives, GM will build the Volt at the Hamtramck, Michigan, plant that currently builds the G-body Buick Lucerne and Cadillac DTS.

Background

The Volt project is an ambitious one. The aim is to create a vehicle that can deliver the equivalent of over 100 miles per gallon, while offering a top speed of 100 mph, and a zero-to-60 time of 8.5 seconds. GM claims the Volt actually returns the equivalent of 230mpg, but its final EPA rating will likely be less than that.

The Volt will be capable of reaching a full charge in 6.5 hours, delivering an all-electric range of 40 miles. A small gas generator is also aboard, netting a total range of several hundred miles. For many customers, this means that the daily commute would require no gasoline.

As with any hybrid, an on-board generator recharges the batteries when the gasoline motor is running. What makes the Volt unique is that’s the only thing the gas motor does — in other words, it never drives the wheels directly.

The biggest news on the Volt’s development thus far is that engineers have come up with an algorithm for testing the durability of the batteries that can simulate 10 years of use — 150,000 miles — in just over two years of testing. Tests using the new algorithm are now going on around the clock in Detroit and Germany.

Looking ahead

In an interview with Leftlane, Volt director Tony Posawatz indicated that several variations of the Volt could be in store for the future. Not only is the Volt platform being engineered to accommodate a hydrogen fuel-cell powertrain in the future, but interchangeable bodies remain a real possibility. Since the hydrogen layout keeps every component in the same location, it makes it possible for GM to design different body styles — such as a sedan or van — that can be placed on the platform. This versatility means your Volt could be an SUV one day and a two-door coupe the next.

The details

Volt will measure 177 inches long, making it a little shorter than the current Cobalt. The electric drive unit (utilizing a 220-cell, 16 kWh lithium ion battery) will put out 150 horsepower and 273 lb-ft. of torque and will top out at 100 miles per hour. Chevy says the Volt is especially quiet to drive thanks to both the electric motor and extensive sound insulation.

GM estimates that the Volt will cost about two cents per mile driven under electric power, well under the 12 cents per mile when using a gasoline engine. Volt will plug into either a standard 120V household outlet or a 240V outlet. It takes about eight hours to charge the Volt on a 120V outlet and three on a 240V. GM estimates that charging will cost about 80 cents based on current energy costs, less than a household refrigerator or freezer.

On an annualized basis GM believes the average driver will save $900 in gas savings, which will be partially offset by an additional $300 in power consumption.

GM says that the interior will also be a strong point for the Volt. A driver-configurable, liquid crystal instrument display, seven inch touch-screen vehicle information monitor and optional navigation system will all highlight GM’s technologies. Bluetooth for cell phones and USB/Bluetooth for music will be standard.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/chevrolet-volt.html

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Volt to Start at $41,000

By Christie Schweinsberg

WardsAuto.com, Jul 27, 2010 12:00 PM

General Motors Co. will price its Chevy Volt range-extender hybrid-electric vehicle at $41,000, including a $720 destination charge, and lease the vehicle at $350 per month for 36 months with $2,500 down.

That puts the bottom line at $33,500 for those qualifying for a $7,500 federal electric-vehicle tax credit. The Volt goes on sale in November in certain U.S. markets after four years of buildup.

“That is a very significant value,” Joel Ewanick, vice president-marketing tells media today during a conference call.

Advertising largely will focus on the lease price for the car but also clearly state the retail price, so as not to mislead consumers, he says.

The federal tax spiff is not available at the point of purchase but is claimed as a deduction when buyers file their annual tax returns.

The Volt's starting price before the tax break is $8,000 more than that of Nissan Motor Co. Ltd.'s all-electric Leaf, which goes on sale in the U.S. in December at $32,780 retail, or $349 per month for a 36-month lease.

But Ewanick says the Volt’s unique nature justifies the higher sticker.

“Our strategy for the Volt will be (that) it’s more car than electric,” he says of the marketing message, noting its status as a range-extender EV, with a gas generator that charges the battery on the fly, makes it unique in the marketplace and eliminates range anxiety for consumers.

Volt's lease price $350 a month.

The Volt can travel 40 miles (64 km) on a charge from a 120V or 240V outlet, then another 300 miles (483 km) on a single tank of gas providing fuel for the on-board generator.

“We think it's a huge value that people are willing to pay for,” Ewanick says of the overall 340-mile (547-km) range of the Volt.

The Leaf, in contrast, is a full EV with no backup generator, able to travel up to 100 miles (161 km) on a fully charged battery, Nissan says.

Beginning today, an ordering website for the Volt, getmyvolt.com, goes live. The website allows consumers in the first roll-out states for the car to place an order with participating Chevy dealers.

Some 600 dealers have qualified to sell the car in the launch states/districts of California, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Michigan, Texas and Washington, D.C.

By 2012, GM plans to take the Volt nationwide, with most dealers expected to meet requirements to sell the car, says Tony DiSalle, Volt marketing director.

After getting in touch with a dealer, buyers will be placed on a waiting list and contacted by a Volt representative. Chevrolet will have representatives available 24/7 to answer buyers’ questions about the car.

Consumers outside the launch states will be able to purchase a Volt but will not be eligible for the lease deal. They’ll also have to arrange shipping if they want to take delivery at a local Chevy dealer.

The Volt will come equipped with navigation, Bluetooth and eight airbags.

Buyers can add four option packages, which include leather seating, rear backup camera, polished wheels and premium paint.

Five years of OnStar service also is available. Fully loaded, the Volt will retail for $37,100, after the tax credit.

Ewanick says the residual value for the Volt will be strong, but he declines to provide a projection.

The Volt's 8-year/100,000-mile (161,000-km) warranty is boosting the residual value enough to make the low lease price possible, he adds.

General Motors Co. will price its Chevy Volt range-extender hybrid-electric vehicle at $41,000, including a $720 destination charge, and lease the vehicle at $350 per month for 36 months with $2,500 down.

That puts the bottom line at $33,500 for those qualifying for a $7,500 federal electric-vehicle tax credit. The Volt goes on sale in November in certain U.S. markets after four years of buildup.

“That is a very significant value,” Joel Ewanick, vice president-marketing tells media today during a conference call.

Advertising largely will focus on the lease price for the car but also clearly state the retail price, so as not to mislead consumers, he says.

The federal tax spiff is not available at the point of purchase but is claimed as a deduction when buyers file their annual tax returns.

The Volt's starting price before the tax break is $8,000 more than that of Nissan Motor Co. Ltd.'s all-electric Leaf, which goes on sale in the U.S. in December at $32,780 retail, or $349 per month for a 36-month lease.

But Ewanick says the Volt’s unique nature justifies the higher sticker.

“Our strategy for the Volt will be (that) it’s more car than electric,” he says of the marketing message, noting its status as a range-extender EV, with a gas generator that charges the battery on the fly, makes it unique in the marketplace and eliminates range anxiety for consumers.

The Volt can travel 40 miles (64 km) on a charge from a 120V or 240V outlet, then another 300 miles (483 km) on a single tank of gas providing fuel for the on-board generator.

“We think it's a huge value that people are willing to pay for,” Ewanick says of the overall 340-mile (547-km) range of the Volt.

The Leaf, in contrast, is a full EV with no backup generator, able to travel up to 100 miles (161 km) on a fully charged battery, Nissan says.

Beginning today, an ordering website for the Volt, getmyvolt.com, goes live. The website allows consumers in the first roll-out states for the car to place an order with participating Chevy dealers.

Some 600 dealers have qualified to sell the car in the launch states/districts of California, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Michigan, Texas and Washington, D.C.

By 2012, GM plans to take the Volt nationwide, with most dealers expected to meet requirements to sell the car, says Tony DiSalle, Volt marketing director.

After getting in touch with a dealer, buyers will be placed on a waiting list and contacted by a Volt representative. Chevrolet will have representatives available 24/7 to answer buyers’ questions about the car.

Consumers outside the launch states will be able to purchase a Volt but will not be eligible for the lease deal. They’ll also have to arrange shipping if they want to take delivery at a local Chevy dealer.

The Volt will come equipped with navigation, Bluetooth and eight airbags.

Buyers can add four option packages, which include leather seating, rear backup camera, polished wheels and premium paint.

Five years of OnStar service also is available. Fully loaded, the Volt will retail for $37,100, after the tax credit.

Ewanick says the residual value for the Volt will be strong, but he declines to provide a projection.

The Volt's 8-year/100,000-mile (161,000-km) warranty is boosting the residual value enough to make the low lease price possible, he adds.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iPsvTEq0PQ&feature=sub&videos=FHhr8q44GGo

link:

http://wardsauto.com/home/volt_start_41000_100727/

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You would think that the savings from a 33% smaller battery (16 kWh in Volt vs 24 kWh in Leaf) would offset the price of a gas range extender... but, no, you pay $9,000 more. The subsidized lease is definitely the way to go.

I'm reading the comments on the Volt's Facebook fan page, and they're ugly. This is one of those instances where it's better to advertise a low starting MSRP (say $29,990 after tax credit) and then add pricey option packages that will be on 95% of Volts. Hell, why even include destination? Nobody else does it.

Edited by pow

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BTW, GM, your videos and graphic design sucks. The whole futuristic theme, video game intro music is so 2002. Take a look at Ford and see what their marketing and branding people are doing...

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Man, it costs a lot of money to save on gasoline.

For me, this would be a better fit than the Leaf, because instead of having to buy and maintain two cars for local and long distance driving, I save money by only having one.

That said, I would have to aspire to own this car, since I cannot currently afford it.

Edit:

I really, really like the configurable instrument cluster. Aspire to own, indeed.

Edited by aaaantoine

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You would think that the savings from a 33% smaller battery (16 kWh in Volt vs 24 kWh in Leaf) would offset the price of a gas range extender... but, no, you pay $9,000 more. The subsidized lease is definitely the way to go.

I'm reading the comments on the Volt's Facebook fan page, and they're ugly. This is one of those instances where it's better to advertise a low starting MSRP (say $29,990 after tax credit) and then add pricey option packages that will be on 95% of Volts. Hell, why even include destination? Nobody else does it.

A couple of factors that I could think of:

I expect that there are large cost savings throughout the entire lifecycle of a simple design like the Leaf.

There are a lot of components/costs that go along with an ICE.

I believe that Nissan has a large (controlling?) partnership/ownership of their battery supplier.

Nissan also has less management of their battery so that should save some cost.

But most importantly, Nissan seems to have plans to sell the Leaf in real volume. I don't get that same sense from GM.

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To get the $7500 tax credit, do you have to pay $7500 in taxes? OR can someone that pays $2500 in taxes still get $7500 back, thus coming out $5,000 ahead?

$41k for what is pretty much Cruze-level size, performance, and amenities is a lot to me. To me the problem with any of these electric or hybrid cars is the fuel savings isn't worth the additional price of the car. Many of these cars also trade performance for economy, like a Fusion hybrid for example gets 41 mpg, but it's slow. If the hybrid had the same performance as the V6, but with 40 mpg, then that to me is worth the price.

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And still, it's time to cook up some crow.

Yeah, this is a stunning success.

At least it has the same name as what was promised.

Edited by GXT

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Man, it costs a lot of money to save on gasoline.

Heh! Nice.

For me, this would be a better fit than the Leaf, because instead of having to buy and maintain two cars for local and long distance driving, I save money by only having one.

Or you could buy the Leaf and for the thousands in cost savings up front and in lower maintenance costs you could rent a Ferrari or a Porsche (or alternate) for your long distance driving.

If you do a lot of long distance driving then of course neither the Volt nor the Leaf is for you.

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To get the $7500 tax credit, do you have to pay $7500 in taxes? OR can someone that pays $2500 in taxes still get $7500 back, thus coming out $5,000 ahead?

As I understand it, you don't have to pay $7500 in taxes to get the rebate.

$41k for what is pretty much Cruze-level size, performance, and amenities is a lot to me. To me the problem with any of these electric or hybrid cars is the fuel savings isn't worth the additional price of the car. Many of these cars also trade performance for economy, like a Fusion hybrid for example gets 41 mpg, but it's slow. If the hybrid had the same performance as the V6, but with 40 mpg, then that to me is worth the price.

As for these cars paying for themselves, a Leaf will be $25,000 after rebates and might save you $1,000/year in fuel. So there might be an economic argument there.

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