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NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

HPP Goes Retro With Dodge Daytona And Plymouth Superbird Kits

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HPP Goes Retro With Dodge Daytona And Plymouth Superbird Kits

Viknesh Vijayenthiran July 29th, 2010

We’re sure many readers are still trying to forget those sorry days back in the 1970s where cars like the Dodge Daytona and Plymouth Superbird used to roll the streets. The cars were hotted up versions of regular models like the Dodge Charger and Plymouth Road Runner, originally developed for NASCAR's homologation requirements, but their outlandish styling--even during the muscle car era of the ‘70s--caused them to be a sales flop.

Fast forward to today and bids for some original examples at auction can range into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Their popularity today has proven so intense that one company, Heide Performance Products (HPP), has even created a modern iteration of the car based on the latest Dodge Challenger.

After unveiling a concept version of the Daytona and Superbird package together with Mopar, HPP is now selling the kit for a starting price of $16,395. This ‘base’ package gets you the revised front fascia, pop-up headlights, aluminum hood (with a T/A-style scoop), the trademark massive rear wing, new taillights, and 20 inch wheels. Inside, there’s a modified instrument cluster, a unique shifter, and HHP floor mats.

Performance upgrades include three different supercharger kits designed for the Challenger’s 6.1-liter Hemi V-8, as well as KW coilover suspension Magnaflow exhaust systems. Other items include a vented hood, a ground-effects bodykit, a custom paint job for the interior and new seats.

All in all there are more than 50 individual components available for interested Dodge Challenger owners, with the total bill for every part coming up to $41,461. This of course does not include installation or the donor Challenger coupe.

link:

http://www.motorauthority.com/blog/1047739_hpp-goes-retro-with-dodge-daytona-and-plymouth-superbird-kits

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Actually, pretty cool. I don't care for the pointedness of the nose... I think the original rounded nose was fine. The pointed nose makes me thing of the Sunfire or the Saturn coupe... very '90s.

I don't understand how the front turnsignals work... On the stock car, I thought they were where the inboard lights... where high beams would have been on the original Challenger. Does this have to open the headlight doors every time you need to signal to turn?

Final bit... I'm disappointed that they don't have more pictures of the Plymouth... I see it has special taillights... I would have liked to see them better.

Edit: More pictures Here. Including the tails of the Plymouth. I kinda like the "Plymouth" much better.

Edited by SAmadei

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The Dodge version of this package is just disgusting.

The "Plymouth" is okay and is far more clean. I like the blackout panel for the taillights.

Edited by whiteknight

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I like them...perfectly outrageous in the style of the originals...

Pretty much, but they lack the rear greenhouse shape to really pull it off.

I'm lukewarm on these, I think I'd take the stock Challenger and keep the change.

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>>"We’re sure many readers are still trying to forget those sorry days back in the 1970s where cars like the Dodge Daytona and Plymouth Superbird used to roll the streets. The cars were hotted up versions of regular models like the Dodge Charger and Plymouth Road Runner, originally developed for NASCAR's homologation requirements, but their outlandish styling--even during the muscle car era of the ‘70s--caused them to be a sales flop."<<

We’re sure many readers are still trying to forget these sorry days (currently) where 'journalists' spin hyperbole & wild uneducated guesses and attempt to pass it off as 'journalism', instead of picking up a reputable book and actually learning something for themselves & us.

In '69, the required production total for 'production' to enter a model into NASCAR was 500 units, so Dodge built 505.

So they could get it into racing.

Because that's why they built it in the first place.

In '70, the total jumped (I believe it went to 1500- not sure), and Plymouth ended up building 1 Superbird for every 2 dealers, which worked out to 1,920 units.

So they could get it into racing.

Because that's why they built it in the first place.

Talking about sales WRT the Superbird/Daytona is directly akin to talking about the 'sales flop' that the Enzo was... and it WASN'T specifically built for racing.

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I remain perfectly content to hate a riceburner with a body kit, yet I don't have a problem with these, I think they look pretty good blending in with the stock bodywork.

I'd keep my own personal 6 speed manual R/T stock with maybe a couple of Mopar accessories, though.

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