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NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

Are the clusters interchangeable between 88 and 98

14 posts in this topic

I have been thinking about this all day yesterday. I am going to sell the Toronado and buy an Eighty Eight. This is why. I fixed the Toronado and completely restored the car. It is in excellent shape. While I like the Toronado and enjoy it, it is not practical and I understand why coupes do not sell in the United States like they did years ago. The Toronado lacks some features I prefer and that the Ninety Eight has. Toronado lacks interior room because it is a sporty design. The roofline is low and causes you to hit your head more often than not. the long coupe doors make it difficult getting in and out in parking spaces because spaces are smaller. The Toronados of the 1970's and up to 1985 had interior room and longer wheelbases. The trunk on the Toronado is small. Do not get me wrong, I like the Toronado, but it does not have dual airbags. It does not have the updated steering wheel controls Oldsmobile installed in 1993. It does not have the 3800 Series II. It has 3800 Series I. The 3800 Series II has better fuel economy. My Ninety Eight is bigger and heavier and uses less fuel.

Putting my bags in my car before and after work in the Ninety Eight is easy, but in the Toronado it is not. The other issue is parts. Parts are becoming harder to come by or almost non existent. That headlight motor is going to go out again. I know this. It may be years from now or a few years from now. The Toronado does not have cup holders at all. Please do not get me started on that. The rear view mirror does have the auto dimming feature. It does not have a compass.

The reason why I decided on Eighty Eight was:

It shares so many parts with Ninety Eight. A lot of them are interchangeable. It shares some or many mechanical parts with Pontiac Bonneville and Buick LeSabre. The 1995 Eighty Eight LSS or the 1997-1998 Regency is optioned so closely to my Ninety Eight, that they only thing missing is the trunk pull down feature, memory seats(LSS), power lumbar(LSS), and remote fuel filler door

( LSS and Regency) and the digital cluster( LSS and Regency). The Toronado does not have any of those features except the remote fuel filler door.

The LSS and Regency have traction control. The Toronado does not.

The Eighty Eight uses the same 3800 Series II as the Ninety Eight. Parts are common and available and plentiful. There are A LOT more Eighty Eights out there too. I would not have to buy an Eighty Eight from the rust belt( the snow states where they use salt on the roads). I can get one from anywhere in the United States. I can be more selective in my mileage too.

My cost of ownership would drop and be the same across the board as the only thing that would be different would be the styling and features. The fuel costs would be the same for Ninety Eight and Eighty Eight. The dual airbags would get me a reduction on my insurance too. There is this sensor on the instrumentation panel in the Toronado if it goes out, it causes the whole instrumentation panel not to light up at all unless that sensor is replaced. I know I replaced it on my second Toronado. This issue along with the headlight issue would go away too after the purchase of an Eighty Eight.

I need to find out if I can switch out the analog gauges and put in the digital gauges. I recall the Ninety Eight with the Touring Package 1994-1995 used analog gauges. The cluster is the same even down to the buttons. The LSS and Regency use the same analog cluster as that car did down to the controls. The clusters look similar to my car even down to the digital readout for mileage and gear selection. I would also have to change out the climate control that is similar to mine in my Ninety Eight. I think it would work. I have taken my instrumentation panel apart before on my Ninety Eight before installed the digital gauges and the stereo with cd player.

I know that the wiring has to be similar. I know that GM did not have different wiring for each car. The Ninety Eight Regency Series I ( the trim below my Ninety Eight) used analog gauges and that cluster is an exact duplicate of the one used in base Eighty Eights and Eighty Eight LS.

Here are some numbers:

1992 Oldsmobile Toronado:

There were 1,239 coupes built in 1992

1995 Oldsmobile Eighty Eight: 11,513 LSS trim level built in 1995

The dimensions:

LSS:

200.4 inches long

74.1 inches wide

55.7 inches height

17.5 cubic ft. trunk space

18.0 gallons fuel

3800 V6 19 city and 29 highway

Regency:

201.6 inches long

74.1 inches wide

55.7 inches height

17.9 cubic ft. trunk

18.0 gallons fuel

3800 V6 19 city and 29 highway

Toronado:

200.3 inches long

72.8 inches wide

53.3 inches height

14.1 or 15.8 cubic ft. trunk space

18.8 gallons fuel

3800 V6 18 city 27 highway

Here are some videos:

1995 Eighty Eight LSS:

1997-1998 Regency:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZPK-Xkj3aY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOxXfsKa1Nw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcrPw8uVZ7k

1996 Ninety Eight: ( this video has the instrumentation cluster I want to switch to in the other cars. This is what is in my Ninety Eight.)

Please could someone tell me if the clusters can be used from car to car as well as the climate control. They are too similar to be different.

Thank you....

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I can't answer your cluster question Ninety Eight, and I understand your reasons & points for the 88 over the Toronado... but... do you really want to part with such a rare car? Is it not possible for you to keep the Toronado and the 98, and add an 88 as a daily driver? You put so much time and effort, let alone money, into that car and I'm not sure you'd be able to find a buyer for the price you want AND deserve (unless you already got that covered). As Oldsmobiles are no longer made, and you have two great examples, can you manage three vehicles? Does your state allow for limited production vehicles to be classified as "special interest/classic" status that would allow you to keep the car ont he road (limited usage), and be entitled to classic car insurance (like Haggarty and others)? I'd hate to see you part ways with the Toronado only to regret it later and have to start over from step one with another project car. BTW, good luck with your 88 search and I know you'll find the exact one to make you happy. I see them all the time on the roadways in NJ, and much like the 98 I like those too (especially the LSS models).

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I can't answer your cluster question Ninety Eight, and I understand your reasons & points for the 88 over the Toronado... but... do you really want to part with such a rare car? Is it not possible for you to keep the Toronado and the 98, and add an 88 as a daily driver? You put so much time and effort, let alone money, into that car and I'm not sure you'd be able to find a buyer for the price you want AND deserve (unless you already got that covered). As Oldsmobiles are no longer made, and you have two great examples, can you manage three vehicles? Does your state allow for limited production vehicles to be classified as "special interest/classic" status that would allow you to keep the car ont he road (limited usage), and be entitled to classic car insurance (like Haggarty and others)? I'd hate to see you part ways with the Toronado only to regret it later and have to start over from step one with another project car. BTW, good luck with your 88 search and I know you'll find the exact one to make you happy. I see them all the time on the roadways in NJ, and much like the 98 I like those too (especially the LSS models).

I thank you for your comments. I am going to buy the Eighty Eight next year about this time. I want to save up the money first and if I still feel the same way August-September 2011, If I do, I will do it. If I do not, I still have my Toronado and money saved up. They have that collector car insurance here. I could add an Eighty Eight and it would not impact me much at all. I just do not have anywhere to keep the Toronado.

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I have a garage up here you could store the Toronado in :smilewide:

To answer your question about the clusters.... I think it's highly dependent on the year

So I can assume a 1995 Ninety Eight digital cluster and climate control would work on a 1995 Eighty Eight LSS????

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Most likely... but I wouldn't want to guarantee it.

I wonder if there is any difference between the later years 1997-1998 Regency?

I would like the LSS for the sportier ride with the digital cluster and 98 climate control.

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Ah! I guess I didn't understand you....

I don't think just swapping the cluster panel will give you automatic climate control if the car doesn't have automatic climate control already.

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The LSS has automatic climate control. It is called dual zone climate control. I know the regular Eighty Eights have the rotary knobs. I know that the extra buttons on the climate control in the Ninety Eight control the information center. That is why I was going to not just swap the digital cluster, but the climate control too to make the information center work.

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I had a change of heart this morning. I have decided to keep my Toronado. This is what happened. I was cleaning the interiors of both cars and I was thinking about what GMC Truck Guy said. I was cleaning and I saw all the hard work I put into both cars. I saw all the effort to get the Toronado where it is. I thought this car is rare and I am just going to walk away from it? I was cleaning and a black 2000-2003 Pontiac Bonneville went down the street and I was like wow.. I have liked Pontiacs as much as I like Oldsmobiles. It was black, and a SSE and it had 4 to five people in the car. I was like that is so sad what they did to Pontiac and Oldsmobile. I said If anything, I should add to my collection not take away from it. I have no where to keep a third car, so I said I will just be content with what I have. If I did get a third car now, I think I would get a Pontiac Bonneville with the Oldsmobile Aurora seats. Another reason I changed my mind is when I was cleaning the Toronado interior, I fell into the backseat. It is not small as I had thought.

Thanks for reading and thanks GMC Truck Guy and Drew.

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No problem, Landis. I'd hate to see you regret getting rid of the Toronado. I LOVE the '90-'93 Toronado, especially the Trofeo models, and know how rare they are around me. I know you'd miss that car in the long run. It was just my two cents being thrown into the ring :)

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No problem, Landis. I'd hate to see you regret getting rid of the Toronado. I LOVE the '90-'93 Toronado, especially the Trofeo models, and know how rare they are around me. I know you'd miss that car in the long run. It was just my two cents being thrown into the ring :)

Thank you again. I cleaned the interiors of the cars. I went back out later in the day and cleaned the exterior of the cars. I was able to get some good exercise with doing that. I cleaned and realized even more so that I need to keep my car. I cleaned both of them and I recognize too they do not make cars like that anymore. I only am one step away from total completion. I am having the rust removed underneath and having the cars undercoated. We do not have the snow and salt issue here, but I want to do it for the long term.

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Glad you're keeping the Toronado. It will become more of a classic more than the Eighty-Eight ever would, though that's not your motivation for having it, and it's just more exclusive, more special. Though it's certainly not the most practical car, being a coupe, I think it's the pinnacle of Oldsmobile design in the '90s, even better than the first generation Aurora.

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Glad you're keeping the Toronado. It will become more of a classic more than the Eighty-Eight ever would, though that's not your motivation for having it, and it's just more exclusive, more special. Though it's certainly not the most practical car, being a coupe, I think it's the pinnacle of Oldsmobile design in the '90s, even better than the first generation Aurora.

Thank you Bobo. It is true what you are saying. You totally get it. The first generation Aurora had about the same interior room even though it was a larger and heavier car. I sat in one and I noticed they designed a great car, but the interior room was lacking for a 4 door. I think what they created was a 4 door coupe. I am not knocking the Aurora, but you make some great point.

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