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2012 LAMBORGHINI JOTA

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2012 LAMBORGHINI JOTA

TEASER IMAGESSPY SHOTS

By Mark Kleis

Leftlane has been tracking the development and testing of the next Lamborghini model, thought to be a Murcielago replacement, for the last year. Now the exotic automaker has decided to begin a slow reveal with six unexplained images to lead up to the model's formal reveal in Paris.

The latest image released by Lamborghini shows a stunning use of carbon fiber to create what might be the hood (in the rear of course), complete with what appears to be 10 vents, indicating the presence of a V10 engine underneath. Previously, speculation suggested a V12 as the powerplant of choice, but between the 10 vents and the manifesto declaring the need to switch from a focus on top-speed to acceleration and handling, a V10 is a likely possibility.

Lamborghini CEO, Stephen Winkelmann, releases brand manifesto

Lamborghini stands for extreme and uncompromising supersportscars of the best Italian tradition. Tradition as a value however, lives at Lamborghini alongside innovation.

We are redefining the future of our supersportscars around the two main reasons to buy: design and performance.

Design has been and always will be reason number one, and we will make sure a Lamborghini will always be recognizable through its significant stylistic features.

Regarding performance, until few years ago priorities were, in this order: top speed, acceleration and handling.

In recent years this has been changing. Together with design, handling and acceleration are becoming more important. Speed is not as important anymore, because all supersportscars are exceeding 300km/h (186 mph) and this is a speed that you cannot reach even on a racetrack, let alone normal roads. We think it is time to make a shift and talk more about handling and acceleration.

The key factor in terms of better handling and acceleration, meaning more immediate pleasure in driving, is the power-to-weight ratio. This is not so much about top speed and so the future will not be so focused on increasing the power, even because CO2 emissions do play a role for supersportscars too. That means the key is in reducing the weight.

A crucial part of this is to understand how to reduce the weight. From the middle of the Eighties, the average weight of our cars has increased by 500 kg because of active and passive safety, comfort and emissions reduction issues, and this is something that we have to change. Since we cannot reduce safety or comfort in our cars, we have to reduce the weight by using new materials.

The magic word for this is 'carbon fiber.' We started working with carbon fiber in Sant'Agata Bolognese over thirty years ago and today, with our two laboratories in Sant'Agata Bolognese and in Seattle, We are mastering a broad range of technologies which put us in a leadership position for low-volume production.

Every new Lamborghini will make the best use of carbon fiber to reduce weight.

First image

Although Lamborghini intentionally left out any sort of description of what this picture is showing, we believe the image may be taken from the side of the vehicle, next to the windshield, and looking back down and across the hood. The carbon fiber likely extends down to the front of the hood, and the interesting-looking black object that appears to be anchored near the bottom right of the image may in fact be a wiper blade.

Lamborghini preps a new model

Rumored to be called "Jota," our latest spy shots give a nice feel for the new Lambo's outrageous profile and its rakish surface development.

The Jota nameplate finds its roots in one of the most storied Lamborghinis to have ever existed, the Miura. The Lamborghini Miura was produced between 1966 and 1972, and represented what many today believe to be the birth of the two-seater, high-performance, mid-engine sports car. In 1970, a Lamborghini test driver named Bob Wallace used a special test mule that was named Lamborghini Miura Jota. The mule was eventually sold, and was tragically later burned to the ground after crashing on the ring road around Brescia.

The Jota will be similar in size to the Murciélago, but this monster is expected to be much lighter and sit lower than the current Lambo range-topper. The Jota was believed to feature an even more powerful V12 with direct-injection, rumored to be good for around 700 horsepower. However, with Lamborghini's latest teaser image and accompanying manifesto, there is speculation for a V10 engine as well.

If the weight savings are truly achieved, along with the incredible power output of as much as 700 hp, expect this Lamborghini to be truly worthy of exotic supercar status. Reports suggest that the Jota will switch to an aluminum space frame instead of the current steel tub frame. The body will take some influence both from the Reventón and the Estoque, and most body parts will be made of carbon fiber. Roof and doors will likely be made from aluminum. Of course, with 700 horsepower the Jota will feature all-wheel drive, and some rumors are suggesting a new all-wheel drive system being co-developed by Swedish company Haldex and Lamborghini.

Our previous illustration was created prior to Leftlane obtaining spy shots of the Jota in testing, and thus a few changes were necessary to reflect what is known of the Jota. The latest illustration gives the most accurate representation of the final product expected to be released by Lamborghini based on the latest design language coming from the Italian automaker, in addition to what could be seen in the latest round of spy shots.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/lamborghini-jota.html

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Lamborghini releases second Paris teaser shot, talks handling and acceleration

by Zach Bowman (RSS feed) on Sep 14th 2010 at 12:31PM

2011 Lamborghini Jota teaser – Click above for high-res image gallery

Another day, another look at the upcoming Lamborghini Jota. According to the press blast, the newest member of the Raging Bull family will be the beginning of something new for the company. Instead of trying to cram as much speed as possible into the chassis, the engineers at Sant'Agata are looking to put top speed on the back burner in favor of vehicle design, acceleration and, get this, handling. How do they plan to do that? By ditching a significant amount of weight. The company says that on average, its products now weigh 1,100 pounds more than they did 25 years ago thanks to additional safety equipment and creature comforts.

In order to help balance the scales, the company plans to get serious about extensively using carbon fiber to slim the waist line of all of its future products. We certainly like the sound of that.

Of course, increasing acceleration and handling by decreasing weight has never been the kind of thing to hurt our feelings, either. Hit the jump to read Lambo's sports car manifesto for yourself.

[source: Lamborghini]

Show full PR text

Lamborghini's Manifesto for future supersportscars

"Lamborghini stands for extreme and uncompromising supersportscars of the best Italian tradition.

Tradition as a value however, lives at Lamborghini alongside innovation.

We are redefining the future of our supersportscars around the two main reasons to buy: design and performance.

Design has been and always will be reason number one, and we will make sure a Lamborghini will always be recognizable through its significant stylistic features.

Regarding performance, until few years ago priorities were, in this order: top speed, acceleration and handling.

In recent years this has been changing. Together with design, handling and acceleration are becoming more important. Speed is not as important anymore, because all supersportscars are exceeding 300km/h (186 mph) and this is a speed that you cannot reach even on a racetrack, let alone normal roads. We think it is time to make a shift and talk more about handling and acceleration.

The key factor in terms of better handling and acceleration, meaning more immediate pleasure in driving, is the power-to-weight ratio. This is not so much about top speed and so the future will not be so focused on increasing the power, even because CO2 emissions do play a role for supersportscars too. That means the key is in reducing the weight.

A crucial part of this is to understand how to reduce the weight. From the middle of the Eighties, the average weight of our cars has increased by 500 kg because of active and passive safety, comfort and emissions reduction issues, and this is something that we have to change. Since we cannot reduce safety or comfort in our cars, we have to reduce the weight by using new materials.

The magic word for this is "carbon fiber". We started working with carbon fiber in Sant'Agata Bolognese over thirty years ago and today, with our two laboratories in Sant'Agata Bolognese and in Seattle, We are mastering a broad range of technologies which put us in a leadership position for low-volume production.

Every new Lamborghini will make the best use of carbon fiber to reduce weight."

Stephan Winkelmann, President and CEO of Automobili Lamborghini SpA

link:

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/09/14/lamborghini-releases-second-paris-teaser-shot-talks-handling-an/

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LAMBORGHINI JOTA

TEASER IMAGESSPY SHOTS

By Mark Kleis

Leftlane has been tracking the development and testing of the next Lamborghini model, thought to be a Murcielago replacement, for the last year. Now the exotic automaker has decided to begin a slow reveal with six unexplained images to lead up to the model's formal reveal in Paris.

The latest image released by Lamborghini shows what appears to be some sort of cross-member brace, most likely in the car's engine bay. Unfortunately, the latest teaser doesn't give us any more hints as to the true identity of the car in question.

Lamborghini CEO, Stephen Winkelmann, releases brand manifesto

Lamborghini stands for extreme and uncompromising supersportscars of the best Italian tradition. Tradition as a value however, lives at Lamborghini alongside innovation.

We are redefining the future of our supersportscars around the two main reasons to buy: design and performance.

Design has been and always will be reason number one, and we will make sure a Lamborghini will always be recognizable through its significant stylistic features.

Regarding performance, until few years ago priorities were, in this order: top speed, acceleration and handling.

In recent years this has been changing. Together with design, handling and acceleration are becoming more important. Speed is not as important anymore, because all supersportscars are exceeding 300km/h (186 mph) and this is a speed that you cannot reach even on a racetrack, let alone normal roads. We think it is time to make a shift and talk more about handling and acceleration.

The key factor in terms of better handling and acceleration, meaning more immediate pleasure in driving, is the power-to-weight ratio. This is not so much about top speed and so the future will not be so focused on increasing the power, even because CO2 emissions do play a role for supersportscars too. That means the key is in reducing the weight.

A crucial part of this is to understand how to reduce the weight. From the middle of the Eighties, the average weight of our cars has increased by 500 kg because of active and passive safety, comfort and emissions reduction issues, and this is something that we have to change. Since we cannot reduce safety or comfort in our cars, we have to reduce the weight by using new materials.

The magic word for this is 'carbon fiber.' We started working with carbon fiber in Sant'Agata Bolognese over thirty years ago and today, with our two laboratories in Sant'Agata Bolognese and in Seattle, We are mastering a broad range of technologies which put us in a leadership position for low-volume production.

Every new Lamborghini will make the best use of carbon fiber to reduce weight.

Although Lamborghini intentionally left out any sort of description of what this picture is showing, we believe the image may be taken from the side of the vehicle, next to the windshield, and looking back down and across the hood. The carbon fiber likely extends down to the front of the hood, and the interesting-looking black object that appears to be anchored near the bottom right of the image may in fact be a wiper blade.

Lamborghini preps a new model

Rumored to be called "Jota," our latest spy shots give a nice feel for the new Lambo's outrageous profile and its rakish surface development.

The Jota nameplate finds its roots in one of the most storied Lamborghinis to have ever existed, the Miura. The Lamborghini Miura was produced between 1966 and 1972, and represented what many today believe to be the birth of the two-seater, high-performance, mid-engine sports car. In 1970, a Lamborghini test driver named Bob Wallace used a special test mule that was named Lamborghini Miura Jota. The mule was eventually sold, and was tragically later burned to the ground after crashing on the ring road around Brescia.

The Jota will be similar in size to the Murciélago, but this monster is expected to be much lighter and sit lower than the current Lambo range-topper. The Jota was believed to feature an even more powerful V12 with direct-injection, rumored to be good for around 700 horsepower. However, with Lamborghini's latest teaser image and accompanying manifesto, there is speculation for a V10 engine as well.

If the weight savings are truly achieved, along with the incredible power output of as much as 700 hp, expect this Lamborghini to be truly worthy of exotic supercar status. Reports suggest that the Jota will switch to an aluminum space frame instead of the current steel tub frame. The body will take some influence both from the Reventón and the Estoque, and most body parts will be made of carbon fiber. Roof and doors will likely be made from aluminum. Of course, with 700 horsepower the Jota will feature all-wheel drive, and some rumors are suggesting a new all-wheel drive system being co-developed by Swedish company Haldex and Lamborghini.

Our previous illustration was created prior to Leftlane obtaining spy shots of the Jota in testing, and thus a few changes were necessary to reflect what is known of the Jota. The latest illustration gives the most accurate representation of the final product expected to be released by Lamborghini based on the latest design language coming from the Italian automaker, in addition to what could be seen in the latest round of spy shots.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/lamborghini-jota.html

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