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GM EXPLORING VOLT BATTERIES FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY SOLUTIONS

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GM EXPLORING VOLT BATTERIES FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY SOLUTIONS

By Drew Johnson

General Motors has announced the signing of a memorandum of understanding with ABB Group that will explore the possibility of using the used batteries from the Chevrolet Volt to recharge the nation’s energy grid.

One major question with electric vehicles is what to do with their battery packs once the vehicle has run its useful life cycle. Although that question remains a real concern, GM is working on a solution that could put the Volt’s used batteries back to work.

Through a partnership with ABB Group, GM is exploring the possibility of using used Volt battery packs to provide stationary electric grid storage systems. The Volt’s batteries are warranted for 8 years, but could see life far beyond that while helping the nation’s energy problems.

“The Volt’s battery will have significant capacity to store electrical energy, even after its automotive life,” said Micky Bly, GM Executive Director of Electrical Systems, Hybrids, Electric Vehicles and Batteries. “That’s why we’re joining forces with ABB to find ways to enable the Volt batteries to provide environmental benefits that stretch far beyond the highway.”

Engineers from both companies are exploring the possibilities of using the batteries for renewable energy storage, grid load management, back-up power supplies and time of use management – which would allow storage of off-peak, and cheaper, electrical power.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/gm-exploring-volt-batteries-for-renewable-energy-solutions.html

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GM looks to put used Volt batteries to work in power grid

Christina Rogers / The Detroit News

Used-up batteries on the 2011 Chevrolet Volt could find a second-life storing energy for the power grid after their usefulness in consumer cars subsides, General Motors officials said today.

The Detroit-based automaker has partnered with ABB Group to explore whether the Volt's lithium-ion batteries can be used for this purpose, entering into a memorandum of understanding with the Switzerland-based engineering firm, GM officials said.

Once removed from the car, the batteries could be recycled to store electricity produced by such renewable sources as wind and solar, which isn't always continuously generated, GM officials said. They could also help even out power grid loads by storing unused electricity in the off-peak hours and supplying it in times of high demand.

The Volt batteries come with an eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty, according to GM. The Volt, a plug-in electric hybrid with both a gas and electric engine, goes on sale later this year.

"The Volt's battery will have significant capacity to store electricity, even after its automotive life," said Micky Bly, GM's executive director for electric vehicles and batteries. "That's why we're joining forces with ABB to find ways to enable the Volt batteries to provide environmental benefits that stretch far beyond the highway."

ABB Group, which has its U.S. headquarters in Cary, N.C., employs 117,000 workers worldwide and specializes in power technologies.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detnews.com/article/20100921/AUTO01/9210398/1148/auto01/GM-looks-to-put-used-Volt-batteries-to-work-in-power-grid#ixzz10BuB67jK

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GM, Swiss firm to partner on Volt batteries

By Chrissie Thompson

FREE PRESS AUTO WRITER

General Motors will partner with Swiss power technologies company ABB Group to explore ways to reuse batteries from the Chevrolet Volt extended-range electric vehicle.

Once Volt batteries lose their effectiveness in the vehicle, estimated to be 10 years into the life of the vehicle, they will still be able to store electric energy, GM said today in a statement. GM and ABB are exploring ways to use the batteries in electric grid storage systems. ABB is the world’s largest supplier of power grid systems, GM said.

GM has put an eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty on the lithium-ion battery that powers the Volt, due to launch by November.

The partnership begins as automakers and power companies seek to boost generating capacity ahead of the introduction of mass-marketed electric vehicles. Increasing dependence on electricity instead of gasoline may stress the current power grid structure. Possible solutions include creating “smart grids,” which can adjust to power appliances and vehicles during times of less demand. Energy may also be priced higher during times of peak demand.

The Volt battery project will explore storing power, including energy generated by the wind and sun, in Volt batteries for use when demand is high. GM and ABB will also explore allowing communities to store power in Volt battery systems to use during power outages.

Read more: GM, Swiss firm to partner on Volt batteries | freep.com | Detroit Free Press http://www.freep.com/article/20100921/BUSINESS01/100921029/1210/GM-Swiss-firm-to-partner-on-Volt-batteries#ixzz10BupcWAN

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So in the future, you can have a yard full of derelict Volts, but you'll be able to wire the batteries up together and attach them to the grid... and you'll be the neighborhood green savior... not an eyesore?

There is no justice. ;-)

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2nd life sought for GM Volt battery

GM, ABB to look at Volt pack

BY CHRISSIE THOMPSON

FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER

General Motors will partner with Switzerland-based power technologies company ABB Group to explore ways to reuse batteries from the Chevrolet Volt extended-range electric vehicle in electric-grid storage, the companies said Tuesday.

GM has put an eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty on the lithium-ion battery that powers the Volt, due to launch by November. GM estimates the batteries will last about 10 years before needing to be replaced. But they'll still be able to store energy for other uses for another five to 10 years, said Micky Bly, who leads GM's electric-vehicle and battery development. .

The GM and ABB partnership, inaugurated Monday, begins as automakers and power companies seek ways to boost generating capacity ahead of the introduction of mass-marketed electric vehicles.

Increasing dependence on electricity instead of gasoline may stress the current power grid structure. Possible solutions include "smart grids," which can adjust to power appliances and vehicles when demand is low. Energy may also be priced higher during peak times.

The Volt battery project will explore storing power, including energy generated by the wind and sun, in Volt batteries for use when demand is high. GM and ABB, the world's largest supplier of power grid systems, will also explore allowing communities to store power in Volt battery systems to use during outages.

Finding a second use for lithium-ion car batteries could help bring down the cost of electric vehicles, Bly said. The Volt stickers for $41,000, including shipping, and buyers are eligible for a $7,500 federal tax credit.

The GM partnership follows one between Nissan and Japan's Sumitomo. Nissan launches its Leaf pure electric vehicle in December.

Read more: 2nd life sought for GM Volt battery | freep.com | Detroit Free Press http://www.freep.com/article/20100922/BUSINESS01/9220331/1331/Business01/2nd-life-sought-for-GM-Volt-battery#ixzz10GMLOmQS

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So in the future, you can have a yard full of derelict Volts, but you'll be able to wire the batteries up together and attach them to the grid... and you'll be the neighborhood green savior... not an eyesore?

There is no justice. ;-)

:lol:

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