Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
NINETY EIGHT REGENCY

GM: Chevrolet Volt Has a Typical EV Range of 25 to 50 Miles

Recommended Posts

GM: Chevrolet Volt Has a Typical EV Range of 25 to 50 Miles

Forty miles of electric range has been the magic number for a very long time, in fact it was part of the Chevrolet Volt concept initial press release back in January 2007.

The idea is that about 75% of drivers drive less than 40 miles per day and will therefore not use any gas while driving the Volt.

GM has said all along that the Volt would achieve that objective but has made it clear that driving behavior and environment could change that number in real world situations; the generator will go on when the battery reaches about 32% state of charge no matter how it gets there.

Today GM filed an updated S1 filing with the US Security and Exchange commission in preparation for its IPO. Buried in that 560 page document was GM’s first admission of the real world EV range expected from the car:

“When powered only from electricity stored in its 16-kWh lithium-ion battery; the Chevrolet Volt has a typical range of 25-50 miles depending on terrain, driving technique, temperature and battery age”

I had the chance to discuss this with Volt spokesperson Rob Peterson.

“We’ve always said up to 40,” said Peterson. Now we “tweaked the EV range to from 25 to 50.”

Peterson explains that GM now has over one million engineering miles with Chevrolet Volt test cars and they are very comfortable with this range which is based on that experience.

He points out some drivers will achieve more than 40 miles of range. “A conservative driver under ideal conditions will get more than 40 miles,” he said. “We don’t often highlight this potential to go beyond 40″

Peterson also says the 25 mile range is “pretty darn close” to the worst case scenario. This would be extreme cold temperatures, with the cabin heating system at full blast driven by a very aggressive driver going mostly uphill.

Peterson said now that the car is so close to launch, “we want consumers to understand” what types of real world electric range they could expect.

“A moderate driver is going to achieve what their expectations are,” he added.

link:

http://gm-volt.com/2010/09/23/gm-chevrolet-volt-has-a-typical-ev-range-of-25-to-50-miles/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I remember that early on they were making sure everyone understood the cold & battery condition along with the pedal to the metal attitude.

Edited by 67impss

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If pressed too the Prius MPG drops a lot. I know people at work who flog their Prius and get pretty poor MPG. The sad part is only some understand why.

No matter how much you educate the public on this car some will complain they are not getting 50 miles on a charge in the dead of winter in Nome Alaska.

Edited by hyperv6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

25 to 50 miles is a HUGE range. I flogged a 2010 Prius from Zipcar, and couldn't get worse than 44 MPG, well within 15% of the EPA figures.

What would be more helpful is the Volt's EV range through different EPA test cycles. Then you could at least compare apples to apples.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

25 to 50 miles is a HUGE range. I flogged a 2010 Prius from Zipcar, and couldn't get worse than 44 MPG, well within 15% of the EPA figures.

What would be more helpful is the Volt's EV range through different EPA test cycles. Then you could at least compare apples to apples.

I think it was Top Gear that got 19 MPG with a Prius when they drove it hard.

I had one person complain theirs did not get the MPG stated. They did not understand that their driving style was not what the Prius was ment for. Seldom did it ever get into electric mode.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it was Top Gear that got 19 MPG with a Prius when they drove it hard.

I had one person complain theirs did not get the MPG stated. They did not understand that their driving style was not what the Prius was ment for. Seldom did it ever get into electric mode.

It got 19 MPG because it was being raced around on a track - meaning WOT all the time. In the real world with speed limits and traffic, you'll struggle to get less than 40 MPG. I found the third gen Prius to get great gas mileage regardless of driving style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We  Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×