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EPA rates Volt 'all-electric' mpg at 93, range at 35 miles

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EPA rates Volt 'all-electric' mpg at 93, range at 35 miles

Gas-only mpg rated at 37; total driving range estimated at 379 miles

Rick Kranz

Automotive News -- November 24, 2010 - 1:57 pm ET

volt-mpg-epa-label.jpg

The 2011 Chevrolet Volt, an innovative plug-in hybrid, got not one but three different mileage ratings from the U.S. EPA today.

On electricity alone, the Volt achieves the equivalent of 93 mpg.

Powered solely by the gasoline engine, the Volt gets 37 mpg.

Running on a combination of electricity and gasoline, the Volt gets 60 mpg, the EPA determined.

Additionally, the EPA said the Volt has a 35-mile range on electricity alone and a range of 379 miles with gasoline and electricity.

General Motors Co. had been saying that the Volt had a range of 35-50 miles on one full battery charge.

“We have said that the range is variable on how you drive,” said Doug Parks, GM’s vehicle line executive in charge of the Volt.

The Volt falls into the EPA compact vehicle segment, which includes such vehicles as the Ford Focus, Chevrolet Cruze and Toyota Corolla.The Volt’s mpg rating was rated as best in the subcompact class by the EPA.

The new mileage label was created by the EPA with input from GM.

Earlier this month, Tom Stephens, GM's global product chief, said Chevrolet would begin shipping the Volt to dealers as soon as the EPA issues a mileage label for the vehicle.

Parks declined to say when shipments would begin, however.

GM's Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant has built Volts for shipment since early November. Parks would not provide a number.

The Volt is the most aerodynamic vehicle GM has produced, Stephens said. GM has said the Volt can travel 25 to 50 miles on battery power alone and offer additional driving range of 310 miles when assisted by a 1.4-liter engine with a full tank of gasoline.

“The Volt does everything we said it was going to do the very first day we announced it — and more,” Stephens said earlier this month. “If you recall back then how many people were saying that they don't even have a battery, they don't have motors or any of this, can this be real?

“The fact is it is real and you can drive it now.”

Stephens said GM is maintaining its plan to produce 10,000 Volts through 2011 and 45,000 in 2012. However, that number could change depending on customer demand and the ability of suppliers to provide parts for the vehicle, he said.

GM has said the combination of a pure electric drive motor and an efficient, range-extending engine, will give the Volt up to 350 total miles of range.

Photo credit: Bloomberg

The 2011 Chevrolet Volt, an innovative plug-in hybrid, got not one but three different mileage ratings from the U.S. EPA today.

On electricity alone, the Volt achieves the equivalent of 93 mpg.

Powered solely by the gasoline engine, the Volt gets 37 mpg.

Running on a combination of electricity and gasoline, the Volt gets 60 mpg, the EPA determined.

Additionally, the EPA said the Volt has a 35-mile range on electricity alone and a range of 379 miles with gasoline and electricity.

General Motors Co. had been saying that the Volt had a range of 35-50 miles on one full battery charge.

“We have said that the range is variable on how you drive,” said Doug Parks, GM’s vehicle line executive in charge of the Volt.

The Volt falls into the EPA compact vehicle segment, which includes such vehicles as the Ford Focus, Chevrolet Cruze and Toyota Corolla.The Volt’s mpg rating was rated as best in the subcompact class by the EPA.

The new mileage label was created by the EPA with input from GM.

Earlier this month, Tom Stephens, GM's global product chief, said Chevrolet would begin shipping the Volt to dealers as soon as the EPA issues a mileage label for the vehicle.

Parks declined to say when shipments would begin, however.

GM's Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant has built Volts for shipment since early November. Parks would not provide a number.

The Volt is the most aerodynamic vehicle GM has produced, Stephens said. GM has said the Volt can travel 25 to 50 miles on battery power alone and offer additional driving range of 310 miles when assisted by a 1.4-liter engine with a full tank of gasoline.

“The Volt does everything we said it was going to do the very first day we announced it — and more,” Stephens said earlier this month. “If you recall back then how many people were saying that they don't even have a battery, they don't have motors or any of this, can this be real?

“The fact is it is real and you can drive it now.”

Stephens said GM is maintaining its plan to produce 10,000 Volts through 2011 and 45,000 in 2012. However, that number could change depending on customer demand and the ability of suppliers to provide parts for the vehicle, he said.

Read more: http://www.autonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20101124/OEM05/101129944/1186#ixzz16EtKt758

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2011 Chevy Volt gets 93 mpge (and 37 mpg and 60 mpg) rating from EPA

by Autoblog Staff (RSS feed) on Nov 24th 2010 at 3:31PM

After yesterday's 99 miles per gallon (equivalent) EPA rating for the Nissan Leaf, General Motors had to be eager to get the numbers for the Chevy Volt from the government – if for no other reason than because these efficiency stickers are the last thing holding up deliveries of the first production vehicles.

Today, GM shared the official numbers with the world, and they range from 37 miles per gallon to 93 mpge (equivalent) combined to 60 mpg "composite." Sixty mpg composite is a "combined, combined" number, and will be completely different for everyone. You might want to think of it as a lifetime figure, since it accounts for both electricity and gasoline consumed. Oh, and it's also best in class for compact cars. The Volt's official electric-only range will be 35 miles, but GM, like Nissan, has been giving a range recently of 25-50 miles. The Volt now has an official total range of 379 miles, with 344 miles of that being extended range (i.e., gas) driving. As Tony DiSalle, Chevrolet product marketing director, said, "If you try to boil it down to a single number, it gets quite difficult."

Doug Parks, Chevrolet Volt Global Vehicle Line Executive, said he is "quite pleased" with the numbers and understands that it is a complicated story to tell. GM and the EPA worked together to come up with this label to figure in all of the different modes that impact the vehicle's efficiency. We've heard that the 2011 Volt will have a temporary EPA label, but Parks told us that what you see above will likely be what we see in next year, saying "Our intent was not to do something that was a one-year deal. Our hope is that this is very similar to the path that everyone will go down in the future. We tried to make the label look as similar as it can to next year."

So, what about that "230 mpg" GM touted last year. Well, that was a different way to calculate things. "230 by itself was never intended to be a composite number," Parks said.

link:

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/11/24/2011-chevy-volt-gets-93-mpge-and-37-mpg-rating-from-epa/

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how does one run on "gas only"? ...yes i'm assuming they let the battery run as low as possible, then start their test, but it's still not technically correct.

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why is there even a yearly cost for gas only, how dumb do they think the buyers are, the arent audi execs are they? (was that audi that said volt buyers were idiots?)

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Someone is going to have to find a better rating sytem for cars like this.

Just like the goverment a day late and a a dollar over budget. They knew these cars were coming and knew they needed a system in place. But here we were waiting for labels for cars already built.

I wish they would turn to SAE to come up with a system that would be fair to all and make it a world wide strandard. If they can standardize bolts sizes and engine HP I am sure they can come up with a reliable standard.

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That's better than I thought it'd be. 93 MPGe isn't far off the Leaf's 99 MPGe, even though the Volt is a heavier and more powerful car. 35 miles official EV range isn't bad either, it's almost half of the all-electric Leaf's.

35/40 mpg in gas mode is nothing special, but it's not horrible either. It's better than Camry Hybrid (33/34) and Jetta TDI (30/41) but not as good as Fusion Hybrid (41/36) or Prius (51/48).

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Just like the goverment a day late and a a dollar over budget. They knew these cars were coming and knew they needed a system in place. But here we were waiting for labels for cars already built.

I wish they would turn to SAE to come up with a system that would be fair to all and make it a world wide strandard. If they can standardize bolts sizes and engine HP I am sure they can come up with a reliable standard.

This is actually a fairly complicated thing to "dumb down", which apparently is what the US consumer requires.

I hope the EPA will make all the meaningful numbers available in a white paper for those who are interested and have the capability to use it.

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why is there even a yearly cost for gas only, how dumb do they think the buyers are, the arent audi execs are they? (was that audi that said volt buyers were idiots?)

Maybe someone took the "freedom drive" to heart?

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If you look at the sticker it appears like the Volt is being compared "among all other vehicles" and comes out on top with a 60MPGe. However (apparently) because the Leaf can't burn gas it was excluded from that graph. Otherwise that "60MPGe Best" would look pretty bad only 2/3rds of the way to the "99MPGe" Leaf.

What makes it even more interesting is that the next two graphs DO include the Leaf.

That sure was "lucky" for GM ;)

Not so good for the consumer who only sees the Volt label and is not properly informed.

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This is actually a fairly complicated thing to "dumb down", which apparently is what the US consumer requires.

I hope the EPA will make all the meaningful numbers available in a white paper for those who are interested and have the capability to use it.

This is why I would rather see a group of top engineers get together and set a stadard that will work for everyone. Remember this is the same goverment that took over a whore house in Nevada and went bankrupt. LOL!

I know there are better groups the goverment could turn to that could make a system that is easier to understand and that would for all the auto companies not just here but world wide. I would even say in this case NASA with their back ground in electric energy could do this. God knows they have little else to do after the last shuttles.

The NASA Glenn Center here in Cleveland specializes in electric, solar and hydrogen power generatins and use. Much of their work in now used in most space craft and the space station. I would think they could come up with a good standard to judge use by.

Yes the public needs to have this dumbed down. Most do not even know what wheels drive their present car so a simpler system is a must.

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IMO there are too many variables to have a "simple" standard to compare across gas, plug-in hybrid, and electric cars. Perhaps the simplest I can think of is a "cost to operate" calculator in which you plug in the cost of gas and the cost of electricity and it tells you your overall cost to operate. But of course that doesn't draw the whole picture, as some are concerned with emissions and oil usage as well.

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Honestly, I don't see what the fuss is about. The labels are fine and clear if you have any knowledge of cars. The combined gas/electric MPGe is for those who just want one number to compare against other cars.

Other than that, you've got:

* EV range

* gas range

* electricity consumption (and electricity efficiency)

* gasoline consumption (and gasoline efficiency)

How is that confusing???

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Chevy Volt Rated at 93mpg on Electric, 60mpg in Hybrid Mode and 37mpg on Gasoline

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2010

VoltUnplugChicago-01.jpg

The official fuel economy numbers for GM's long-awaited Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid are in. Given that the Volt uses two energy sources, electricity from the grid, and gasoline from the pump, with the mix depending on how far you drive and how often you charge the battery, the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) released three mileage ratings.

When driven in pure electric mode, the Volt has an MPG equivalent (MPGe) equivalent of 93 miles per gallon [equal to 2.5 lt/100km]. The EPA determined this figure by using a standardized formula that converts kilowatt-hours of electricity to gallons of gas.

According to the EPA, with a fully charged battery, the Volt has a driving range of 35 miles, which is less than the 40 mile range GM had previously announced.

Once the battery is drained and the 1.4-liter gasoline fueled engine / generator kicks in to motivate the Volt, the car is rated at 37 miles per gallon [6.4 lt/100km]. Finally, the government agency determined that when using both its batteries and gasoline engine, the Volt will get 60 miles per gallon [3.92 lt/100km].

LINK:

http://carscoop.blogspot.com/2010/11/chevy-volt-rated-at-93mpg-on-electric.html

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