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Chrysler registers Cuda nameplate, Hemi engine perks up in interest

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Chrysler registers Cuda nameplate, Hemi engine perks up in interest

by Jeremy Korzeniewski (RSS feed) on Dec 21st 2010 at 6:58PM

sox-martin-cuda.jpg

Fewer nameplates resonate with the muscle-obsessed Mopar crowd more than the Cuda. Packing a 426 Hemi engine under the long, shaker-equipped hood, the classic 'Cuda was potent enough to strike fear into the hearts and souls of more plebeian hardware... which was pretty much everything else on the road.

Now that the muscle car wars are officially back in full swing – and, perhaps most importantly, the latest Mustang, Camaro and Challenger have all proven to be hits with the American population – Chrysler has hinted that the 'Cuda could once again terrorize the dealership lot.

According to Allpar.com, Chrysler has even registered the name Cuda as a trademark. As we've said in the past (and our readers seem to agree), we'd be more than happy to welcome back the Barracuda to the muscle car fold... just so long as it's significantly different from the Dodge Challenger with which it will surely share its underpinnings.

Now would be a good time to point out that the 'Cuda was historically a bit smaller than the Challenger, with a two-inch reduction in wheelbase when compared to its sibling. What we can say for certain is that a reborn 'Cuda, should it ever see the light of day, won't be wearing its old Plymouth name badge. Our best guess is that it would be sold as a Chrysler. In any case, consider our interest piqued.

link:

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/12/21/chrysler-registers-cuda-nameplate-hemi-engine-perks-up-in-inter/

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CHRYSLER TRADEMARKS “CUDA” NAMEPLATE

By Andrew Ganz

Once upon a time, the then-Chrysler Corporation’s Plymouth division offered a high-performance muscle coupe simply called the ‘Cuda. Short for Barracuda, it shared a platform with the Dodge Challenger. Lasting through 1974, the ‘Cuda was one of the first nameplates killed off by a combination between rising fuel prices and increased government regulations.

Now, Chrysler has apparently trademarked the nameplate Cuda. Ever since the debut of the reborn Challenger back in 2008, the automaker has hinted that it wanted to revive the Barracuda, but the fact that Plymouth bit the dust nearly a decade ago makes things a bit trickier.

According to Allpar, Chrysler has registered the word Cuda – without the abbreviated apostrophe – but the Chrysler-crazy site doesn’t have any concrete details regarding what the automaker might do with it. And Chrysler might not do anything with it at all – automakers regularly register and re-register trademarks they don’t currently plan to use only so they can keep them out of other companies’ hands.

The most likely scenario is that Chrysler will introduce a Dodge Challenger Hemi Cuda package, probably a new retro throwback-style appearance and performance group. That’s mere speculation, so you’ll have to stay tuned for more details as we hear them.

link:

http://www.leftlanenews.com/chrysler-trademarks-cuda-nameplate.html

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I imagine that GM will be watching this very carefully... as the GM mindset is currently Camaro sales = Camaro sales + Potential Firebird sales. If (assuming it comes out as a 2012) 2012 Cuda + 2012 Challenger sales > 2011 Challenger sales by a significant factor, GM will look somewhat foolish.

Of course, IMHO, the Cuda and Challenger were never as differentiated from each other as the F-bodies were... so I'm not sure Chrysler is making a brilliant move bringing back the Cuda.

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I beg to differ on the point of differentiation. The 'Cuda and Challenger were easily as different as Camaro and Firebird. The altered wheelbase of the 'Cuda balances the drivetrain differences of the F-body siblings in my view. Park a 'Cuda next to a Challenger and the differences become more dramatic.

On the sales front, the two pairs are in different positions. The Challenger owes its success today to the legend of the 'Cuda more than its own legacy. If Plymouth had survived, only a new 'Cuda would have been built. In the case of Camaro and Firebird, the stronger legend is the nameplate we have today. That's a big difference for the marketeers.

It would be far easier, and less risky for Chrysler to do a new 'Cuda than it would be for GM to do a new Firebird. In a way, Firebird's strength in the past is its weakness now. The opposite is true for Challenger, it inherited the 'Cuda legacy by default.

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On 12/22/2010 at 6:42 AM, SAmadei said:

I imagine that GM will be watching this very carefully... as the GM mindset is currently Camaro sales = Camaro sales + Potential Firebird sales. If (assuming it comes out as a 2012) 2012 Cuda + 2012 Challenger sales > 2011 Challenger sales by a significant factor, GM will look somewhat foolish.

Of course, IMHO, the Cuda and Challenger were never as differentiated from each other as the F-bodies were... so I'm not sure Chrysler is making a brilliant move bringing back the Cuda.

You do realize the 1967- late seventies Camaro and Firebird shared fender's, doors, quarter panels, roof skins, trunk lids, wheelbase, glass etc, and that came from a friend who is a hardcore Firebird fan/owner. Also, I know a guy who was buying up Firebird's and converting them to Camaro's because it was so damn easy to do, and he could get more money for the car because it had Camaro trim and badge. 

The Challenger and Barracuda shared no sheet metal whatsoever, and the Challenger uses hardtop Barracuda quarter window glass for the convertible models. The Challenger is longer and wider than the Barracuda. Firebird's and Camaro's are basically the same.

It's easier to differentiate a Barracuda from a Challenger at 100 feet than it is to tell the difference between a Camaro or Firebird at 10 feet. 

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On 12/22/2010 at 7:58 AM, Camino LS6 said:

I beg to differ on the point of differentiation. The 'Cuda and Challenger were easily as different as Camaro and Firebird. The altered wheelbase of the 'Cuda balances the drivetrain differences of the F-body siblings in my view. Park a 'Cuda next to a Challenger and the differences become more dramatic.

On the sales front, the two pairs are in different positions. The Challenger owes its success today to the legend of the 'Cuda more than its own legacy. If Plymouth had survived, only a new 'Cuda would have been built. In the case of Camaro and Firebird, the stronger legend is the nameplate we have today. That's a big difference for the marketeers.

It would be far easier, and less risky for Chrysler to do a new 'Cuda than it would be for GM to do a new Firebird. In a way, Firebird's strength in the past is its weakness now. The opposite is true for Challenger, it inherited the 'Cuda legacy by default.

Not to steal any thunder from your excellent post but to add: The Camaro and Firebird were direct competitors to the Mustang and Barracuda. Dodge, late to the game, chased the Cougar and Javelin which were marketed more upscale from the other's. Plymouth's Barracuda had a six year head start over the Challenger which was introduced in 1970 along with an all new Barracuda.

The Barracuda enjoyed huge success at the race track and rally events all over the country. The only area Plymouth fell short on was the Trans Am series and ultimately sales. While the Mustang was based on the Falcon platform, Ford had more resources at hand to bring all new sheet metal to the game. Barracuda, based off the Valiant platform, was a victim of budget woes and shared too much body work with the Valiant which hurt sales for what was really a superior car in many ways. The Challenger did benefit from the Barracuda in many ways. The Barracuda was well established at the track and had a  street creed few cars could match. Funny thing, Challenger outsold the Barracuda from 1970 - 74. Go figure.

Your post really hits nail on the head.

I will add that, being a hard core Chrysler fanatic with a preference towards Plymouth, my gut feeling is if Chryco wants to bring back the Barracuda, then bring back Plymouth. That won't happen so leave the nameplate buried. I feel that way about Firebird too. Bring back Pontiac or leave Firebird in the grave too. 

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I would really like to know, officially, what would be involved were FCA to bring out a "Plymouth Barracuda" - is there some process that involves federal registration of the brand name, something that would take lawyers and filings and time, or can it 'just be done'?

Edited by balthazar

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1 hour ago, balthazar said:

I would really like to know, officially, what would be involved were FCA to bring out a "Plymouth Barracuda" - is there some process that involves federal registration of the brand name, something that would take lawyers and filings and time, or can it 'just be done'?

Probably no different than when they rebranded the Dodge Ram to Ram in '10.  I wonder how much time and money that involved.  

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If Cuda is supposed to put the fear of GOD into people, does that mean this will have more power than a HellCat?

:scratchchin:

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4 minutes ago, dfelt said:

If Cuda is supposed to put the fear of GOD into people, does that mean this will have more power than a HellCat?

:scratchchin:

HELLFISH!!!!

  • Upvote 1

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10 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

HELLFISH!!!!

:P FCA AWD HellFish :scratchchin:

:roflmao:

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lol this is such an old thread... It appears they've done nothing with the name in 7 years.

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I think it is one of those things where they have re-register a name every so often to keep other companies from using it...the endless rumors about a new Barracuda on Allpar and other sites seem to have gone nowhere...

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I get the 'protecting the trademark' aspect. My question is (assuming the trademark is secured), could FCA theoretically announce and sell a "Plymouth Barracuda" just by shipping them to dealers? Or is there federal paperwork required? 

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1 hour ago, balthazar said:

I get the 'protecting the trademark' aspect. My question is (assuming the trademark is secured), could FCA theoretically announce and sell a "Plymouth Barracuda" just by shipping them to dealers? Or is there federal paperwork required? 

I understand the history of the name, but why bother with Plymouth, why not just call it a Dodge Cuda and be done with it.

As long as it has a big ass hemi and tire burning torque, it will sell in limited quantities.

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5 hours ago, dfelt said:

I understand the history of the name, but why bother with Plymouth, why not just call it a Dodge Cuda and be done with it.

As long as it has a big ass hemi and tire burning torque, it will sell in limited quantities.

Because 'Dodge Cuda' would be as bad as 'Chevrolet Firebird'. 

 

Branding it it as an SRT Cuda is one rumor I've read, though.  

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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5 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

Because 'Dodge Cuda' would be as bad as 'Chevrolet Firebird'. 

 

Branding it it as an SRT Cuda is one rumor I've read, though.  

Well SRT Cuda under the Dodge logo. That works too.

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17 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Well SRT Cuda under the Dodge logo. That works too.

I was thinking separate from Dodge, like the Viper was the SRT Viper for some years...though branding it as a Chrysler could work, since Chrysler and Plymouth were paired at dealers in olden days..

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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@Cubical-aka-Moltar In a past thread I had posted how within 2hrs of buying a lime green Hellcat, the owner trying to race it on city streets crashed and totaled the auto.

I wonder how fast the first Cuda will get totaled. I also wonder what the insurance will be on this auto or if any company will insure it? :scratchchin:

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Just now, dfelt said:

@Cubical-aka-Moltar In a past thread I had posted how within 2hrs of buying a lime green Hellcat, the owner trying to race it on city streets crashed and totaled the auto.

I wonder how fast the first Cuda will get totaled. I also wonder what the insurance will be on this auto or if any company will insure it? :scratchchin:

Since the Cuda is hypothetical at this point, I wonder when the first Demon will be totalled?   Will it actually get off a dealer lot before being crashed? 

  • Upvote 1

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