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William Maley

Ford News: Rumorpile: Turbocharged Four-Cylinder Mustang.. Destined For Europe Only UPDATED: Or Maybe Not

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By William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

March 8, 2013

If you have been keeping track on the whole pile of rumors concerning the next-generation Focus RS, you would know that the engine being talked about would possibly be shared with the next-generation Mustang. The engine in question is a turbocharged 2.3L unit that will be based on the Focus ST's 2.0L and produce somewhere in the range of 300+ horsepower.

Now for some bad news for those who were hoping for a return of the Mustang SVO in the states. Edmunds is reporting that that the four-cylinder will only be available for European customers when introduced. The reason for this is that the V8 Mustang would be taxed higher due to high emissions. The four-cylinder option allows Ford to offer a lower-emissions model which means less tax.

Source: Edmunds

UPDATE: So the U.S. will be getting the four-cylinder turbocharged Mustang, at least that is what Road & Track is reporting. R&T is also saying the turbo-four will not be the base engine, most likely sitting between the V6 and V8 engines.

Our thoughts? We're going to be on the wait and see if this happens or not.

Source: Road & Track

William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.


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I do not think this will have the gas mileage they think it will have. Turbo's continue to show great mileage when driven like a slow mo senior, but when enjoyed with the power they can produce, mileage is in the toilet.

Give me a normal aspiration v6 or v8. The people of Europe need to rebel against the socialist slave masters and demand being able to drive what they want without being told what you can drive.

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CAFE makes a 4 cylinder Mustang (and Camaro) inevitable sooner rather than later. I know things will never be as bad as the 88 hp 2.3L in the Fox Mustangs, but I still prefer a V6.

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europe = displacement tax, i bet the euro one only gets a 2.3

The Euro mustang should be AWD option too. In fact, if i were ever interested in a mustang I would want AWD too.

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europe = displacement tax, i bet the euro one only gets a 2.3

The Euro mustang should be AWD option too. In fact, if i were ever interested in a mustang I would want AWD too.

• what if an Awd version used front-electrics instead of an origami driveshaft arrangement?

• what if it was only available as a considerable upcharge?

• what if it wasn't called a 'Mustang'?

• what if it WAS a Lincoln?

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AWD would just add weight. Road & Track is reporting the US will get the turbo also.

the only way I would ever consider a mustang or camaro is if it had AWD on the option sheet....because of the snow bit. If i could ever afford a toy car, then that would exempt that. But affording one car for starters means said car has to get around 4 seasons and not just be for fun.

Considering how popular cars like the Eclipse and WRX were with turbo+AWD, I think there would be a bigger market for it than you think. Lots of youngsters who dig Audis and such with the Quattro + turbo may then be able to be attracted to with this car.

I wouldn't do the v6 or v8 with it though. That is part of the allure of this 2.3t is to pair it with AWD as an option. It may not be a tire shredder but it would add something new to the mustang stable.

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AWD would just add weight. Road & Track is reporting the US will get the turbo also.

the only way I would ever consider a mustang or camaro is if it had AWD on the option sheet....because of the snow bit. If i could ever afford a toy car, then that would exempt that. But affording one car for starters means said car has to get around 4 seasons and not just be for fun.

Snow tires on all 4 corners...that's how I drove a Mustang in NE Ohio for 6 winters back in the day before I got an SUV.

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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In the pacific northwest, anything AWD is preferred, then 4x4 and then FWD or RWD.

With all the hills and the outdoor life style, people want the added traction going into the mountains and getting around the hills here.

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In Colorado, I always parked my Mustang GT and M3 when the weather got bad and drove my Jeep. A Mustang will always be a #2 or #3 car for me (unless I were living some place nice that has no foul winters like So Cal or South Florida).

As far a 4cyl Mustang, I'd like to drive one, I'm sure it would be much improved compared to the weak 2.3 my '86 LX had. But I'd still rather have a V8...

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AWD would just add weight. Road & Track is reporting the US will get the turbo also.

the only way I would ever consider a mustang or camaro is if it had AWD on the option sheet....because of the snow bit. If i could ever afford a toy car, then that would exempt that. But affording one car for starters means said car has to get around 4 seasons and not just be for fun.

Considering how popular cars like the Eclipse and WRX were with turbo+AWD, I think there would be a bigger market for it than you think. Lots of youngsters who dig Audis and such with the Quattro + turbo may then be able to be attracted to with this car.

I wouldn't do the v6 or v8 with it though. That is part of the allure of this 2.3t is to pair it with AWD as an option. It may not be a tire shredder but it would add something new to the mustang stable.

I drove my RWD CTS around Pittsburgh through 4 seasons of snow (along with my RWD Caprice and RWD Continental). As long as I had snow tires, I was fine.

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AWD would just add weight. Road & Track is reporting the US will get the turbo also.

the only way I would ever consider a mustang or camaro is if it had AWD on the option sheet....because of the snow bit. If i could ever afford a toy car, then that would exempt that. But affording one car for starters means said car has to get around 4 seasons and not just be for fun.

Considering how popular cars like the Eclipse and WRX were with turbo+AWD, I think there would be a bigger market for it than you think. Lots of youngsters who dig Audis and such with the Quattro + turbo may then be able to be attracted to with this car.

I wouldn't do the v6 or v8 with it though. That is part of the allure of this 2.3t is to pair it with AWD as an option. It may not be a tire shredder but it would add something new to the mustang stable.

I drove my RWD CTS around Pittsburgh through 4 seasons of snow (along with my RWD Caprice and RWD Continental). As long as I had snow tires, I was fine.

Yes, I did the same w/ a 4cyl Mustang from '88-94 in E/NE Ohio...hilly and often very snowy. Got around fine... AWD is a crutch for people raised in a FWD world and too cheap to buy proper snow tires instead of weak all-season tires. Though it makes sense in certain specialized models like Audis, WRXes, Porsche C4s, etc.

Though when living in areas w/ snowy winters I'd rather have a proper 4x4 SUV for the ground clearance...ground clearance helps w/ going through snow, climbing over curbs, etc.

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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another one of those deals where manly men put snows on their RWD car or drive backwards 40 miles each way in a snowstorm with summer tires on their Camaro, but -the market- repeatedly demonstrates why so many offerings before gravitate to AWD eventually. It either sells more cars or keeps the cars from being unsold.

the appeal and sales potential of these kinds of cars go from being toy car / car#2 ( Moltar just not a lot of folks out there who have that Jeep for the winter and the toy car for the summer) to being a potential 'the car' for a lot greater base of people. And it could keep cars like the Camaro and Mustang much more viable in the marketplace for a longer range of time to a more diverse demographic.

911's, GT-R's, WRX, Eclipse, all those cars really make use of the AWD from the performance aspect as well.

Mustang turbo4 AWD would be a great offering to reach out to the market in Europe and sort of gain acceptance with a new crowd in the US.



In the pacific northwest, anything AWD is preferred, then 4x4 and then FWD or RWD.

With all the hills and the outdoor life style, people want the added traction going into the mountains and getting around the hills here.

So there is no reason for anyone to buy a Mustang in that area then, really, unless they have the jing to buy a second car.

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The Mustang (and Camaro) would need to shed weight before adding AWD. For the Camaro going onto Alpha, we already know adding AWD isn't a problem.

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AWD/ etc isn't an issue in So Cal, AZ, FL, TX, etc...I see a lot of Mustangs and Camaros around here. It would be very interesting to see what percentage of sales of RWD sporty cars like the Mustang, Camaro, and Challenger are in the sunshine states vs more cold-weather states.

People in Colorado that I knew that had them had them as 2nd/3rd cars, though I know one guy from South Dakota that lives in Denver who has always had only Mustang GTs that he drives year round, kind of unusual...

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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A turbo 4 makes sense, even if it makes 250-260 hp that is about all you got out of a V8 Mustang from the early 2000s, and up until a few years ago the V6 Mustang had 210 hp. Assuming the V6 gets upgraded or they do an Ecoboost V6 Mustang with 360 hp, the turbo 4 and V6 would provide enough power for 90% of buyers.

Plus V8s makes so much power now you need to beef up the transmission, suspension, chassis, etc and that costs money. The Mustang is supposed to be affordable, not priced like a 3-series or more. If entry level luxury cars have 4-cylinders (even the 5-series does and CTS may soon too), it makes sense that the Camaro and Mustang do also.

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mustang and genesis coupe are now in some circles direct competition. a four pot turbo stang would then be able to match up in that way to the Genesis.

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The Genesis Coupe 4-cylinder is like 3400 lbs too. The Toyota/Scion/Subaru GT86/BRZ is super light and you know a turbo will get added to that. Mustang and Camaro are going to head that way. Plus if a $40k ATS has a 2.0T, how do you put a 320 hp V6 in a $25k Camaro? Although the same people that say the ATS's base 2.5 liter four is fine would probably riot if the Camaro had a 2.5 liter 4 as the base engine. Personally, I don't think that engine should be in any of GM's rear drive cars, but if they did it to the ATS, I won't be surprised if they do it to the Camaro.

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another one of those deals where manly men put snows on their RWD car or drive backwards 40 miles each way in a snowstorm with summer tires on their Camaro, but -the market- repeatedly demonstrates why so many offerings before gravitate to AWD eventually. It either sells more cars or keeps the cars from being unsold.

the appeal and sales potential of these kinds of cars go from being toy car / car#2 ( Moltar just not a lot of folks out there who have that Jeep for the winter and the toy car for the summer) to being a potential 'the car' for a lot greater base of people. And it could keep cars like the Camaro and Mustang much more viable in the marketplace for a longer range of time to a more diverse demographic.

911's, GT-R's, WRX, Eclipse, all those cars really make use of the AWD from the performance aspect as well.

Mustang turbo4 AWD would be a great offering to reach out to the market in Europe and sort of gain acceptance with a new crowd in the US.

In the pacific northwest, anything AWD is preferred, then 4x4 and then FWD or RWD.

With all the hills and the outdoor life style, people want the added traction going into the mountains and getting around the hills here.

So there is no reason for anyone to buy a Mustang in that area then, really, unless they have the jing to buy a second car.

All those Microsoft Millionares get the camero or mustang for their summer rides :P Rest of the time, you see a large amount of AWD for the added traction in constant rain/snow on hills.

Even with proper tires which I had for RWD in the 70's and 80's, AWD trumps RWD for ultimate traction and when you do know how to drive, then you can push an AWD to a limit that far exceeds what RWD is capable of handling. I have tons of respect for RWD, but after owning 4x4's and AWD. There is just way to much benefit to not have AWD now.

If I was in the south, I would have no problem with FWD/RWD auto's. There is a place and purpose for where AWD auto's should be. The flat of the mid west once can get around with RWD or FWD and the proper snow tire, but on hills with heavy wet snow, you will loose out every time.

I think if they can shed the weight, then all auto's should go with AWD as I think the driving dynamics are superior to the RWD or FWD auto's.

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