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William Maley

Tesla's Entry-Level Model Could Be Coming Sooner Than Expected

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The long-hinted entry-level Tesla offering, the Model E could be shown earlier than anyone expected.

AutoBild had the chance to interview Tesla's Chief Designer, Franz von Holzhausen. Holzhausen revealed that the Model E could be shown at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show, a full year ahead than what everyone was expecting.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been hinting at the Model E for awhile, saying that it would be the size of a BMW 3-Series, have a range of 200 Miles, and cost somewhere around $30,000 (after federal EV tax credits).

Holzhausen also revealed that work on the Tesla's next model, the seven-seat Model X crossover was coming to close.

Source: AutoBild

William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.


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Be interesting to see what affect this would have on the other auto makers.

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considering the lack of interest in electrics at the prices they are being sold at, it is more likely for development in electrics to advance faster at Tesla than they would at a GM etc.

So in that regard, it is probably a good thing Tesla is still around to sort of break new ground. Ultimately I think if GM would swing for the fences with it, they would be beyond most successful re inventing the automobile.

I just hope someone does it before the government intervenes and tells everyone what to build for electrics and cars in general.

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