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15 New Car Auto's to Avoid


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G. David Felt
Alternative Fuels & Propulsion writer
www.CheersandGears.com

 

15 New Car Auto's to Avoid

 

Forbes published their 2015 list of 15 cars to Avoid.

 

#15 - Smart ForTwo - due to premium fuel, under powered and lack of space

#14 - Scion iQ - oddly aligned seeting for 3, lack of room, poor quality, etc.

#13 - Nissan Titan - Outclassed in every way by US trucks and worst values.

#12 - Nissan Armada - Poor reliability, ownership cost, fuel economy and quality

#11 - Mitsubishi Mirage - Sluggish engine, performance, quality, value

#10 - Mitsubishi iMiEV - Rock bottom residual value, lowest performance score for EV's

#9 - Lincoln MKT - Below average quality, reliability and depreciation

#8 - Lincoln MKS - Below average performance, quality, value and residual value

#7 - Jeep Wrangler - Poor passenger comfort, harsh ride and handling, noise, value & quality

#6 - Jeep Patriot - poor performance, reliability and below average residual value

#5 - Jeep Compass - poor performance, reliability and below average residual value

#4 - Fiat 500L -  poor quality, performance, reliability and below average resale value

#3 - Dodge Journey - poor quality, performance, reliability short and long term.

#2 - Cadillac XTS - Poor Value, Quality, performance and resale value

#1 - BMW 7 Series - Poor Handling, Highest Operating cost, worst value and below average performance

 

Forbes compiled this list based on ratings from consumers reports and JD power.  They looked at these models compared to like models in the same segment in coming up with these top 15 versions to avoid. An interesting observation is that all of these auto's are also known to have electronic issues according to their research making them more expensive than normal to fix once out of warranty.

 

Now that you have Forbes top 15 autos's to avoid for the 2015 model year, what are your top 15 cars to avoid in the coming new year?

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#7 The Wranger - They just don't get it.

#11 - I'm not the biggest fan, but the car suits its market

#2 - If you care about performance, get the V-Sport.... if you don't care, get the standard V6... problem solved.

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We'll need to have a D-fib on the ready when SMK reads that.

 

The 7-series is completely underwhelming this days... clearly at the back of the pack in that class. It is for people who only buy BMWs and need the largest one. Sitting in one is like a time-warp back to 1994.  The A8 and S-Class are superior and the K900 and Genesis are dangerously close.  Once you figure in the money factor, spending the coin on a 7-series over a Genesis or even an XTS simply doesn't make sense.... unless you're only after the badge like SMK is. 

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That is actually a really good list.  The 7-series is bad for it's class, but I don't know if it is the worst car to buy.   The S-class is overwhelmingly better than any of its competitors, why anyone shopping in that class would buy anything else is beyond me.   Is the Dodge Avenger still made?  That should be top 5 if it still is. 

 

The Jeeps and Nissans are on there because those are products that are about 10 years on market and weren't even good when they were knew.  The MKS and XTS are overpriced Taurus and Imapala.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Some of these are rather obvious, but I agree with smk in that those shopping the high end almost-limo type class would probably opt for the S Class due to the "Mercedes factor", but I think that anyway those buying a S Class probably don't pay much attention to lists like these.

Edited by jcc
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I was finally in a Wrangler earlier this year & I thought it was nearly intolerable on a few major counts… but I recognize & respect that some folk love them.

I certainly would not call it 'one of the worst' or whatever, especially since it's such a niche product with no competition.

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