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William Maley

Mitsubishi News: New York Auto Show: 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi is putting on a bold face with the introduction of the 2016 Outlander at the New York Auto Show.

The Outlander boast over 100 changes with the hope of improving where it stands in the marketplace. The most noticeable change is the front end as it adds a black and chrome grille, along with LED position lights. New 18-inch wheels, rear bumper, and LED taillights finish off the exterior.

Inside, Mitsubishi changed out the steering wheel, added new seating surfaces, display audio system and a new auto-dimming rearview mirror with Homelink for the GT model.

Power will come from a 2.4L four-cylinder with 166 horsepower for most of the lineup. A 3.0L V6 with 215 horsepower is standard on the GT model. Front-wheel drive is standard, while the automaker's Super All Wheel Control - S-AWC - is optional. Mechanical changes include a redesigned suspension, revised electric power steering system, and changes to the CVT.

Source: Mitsubishi

Press Release is on Page 2


MITSUBISHI MOTORS NEW 2016 OUTLANDER MAKES WORLD DEBUT AT THE 2015 NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW

  • The 2016 Outlander showcases Mitsubishi's new design language for the first time on a production vehicle
  • The new Outlander features over 100 engineering and design improvements
  • The 2016 Outlander marks a new era for the Mitsubishi brand relating to style, refinement and overall driving experience

Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) today unveiled the new 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander seven-passenger crossover at the 2015 New York International Auto Show. The 2016 Outlander is the first Mitsubishi production vehicle to showcase the brand's new design language. The 2016 Outlander is not just a cosmetic "refreshing," however, and features an unprecedented number of important engineering and design improvements that increase the level of refinement and overall driving experience. The 2016 Outlander is a segment-leading vehicle that will appeal to buyers wanting value, quality and safety.

"The 2016 Outlander has an eye-catching new design aesthetic inside and out, and with its long list of engineering upgrades, the new Outlander literally looks, drives and feels like an entirely new vehicle, making it an even more compelling value than before," said MMNA Executive Vice President, Don Swearingen. "Mitsubishi's outstanding sales momentum is carrying into the new-year and with the arrival of the 2016 Outlander crossover we are well positioned to sustain our growth."

The 2016 Outlander features Mitsubishi's new front design concept, "Dynamic Shield." This feature is inherited from the bumper side protection seen on generations of the Montero, providing unique protection for both the people and car.

Numerous design and engineering improvements have been made to the chassis of the 2016 Outlander, including increased body and suspension structural rigidity, redesigned suspension and Electric Power Steering, noise-isolating windshield and rear door glass, more sound insulation throughout the vehicle, new dynamic front suspension and rear differential dampers, improved weather stripping and engine compartment trim (all models). Additionally, the new generation continuously-variable transmission offers improved acceleration, performance, shift feel and torque delivery (all CVT-equipped models).

The exterior design features of the 2016 Outlander include a redesigned front fascia, front fenders, halogen headlights, LED position lights, lower door sections, 18-in. alloy wheels, rear fascia and LED taillights (all models); and power-folding side mirrors, windshield wiper de-icer and LED headlights (GT model). The reconfigured interior includes a redesigned steering wheel, seating surfaces, accent trim, rear folding seat, headliner, display audio system (all models) and auto-dimming rearview mirror with Homelink® (GT model).

Mitsubishi's advanced safety systems including Forward Collision Mitigation (FCM), Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) are now available for the SEL and GT Models.


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Is it me or does that front end have a bit of Lexus Predator Mouth on it? ;) Me think so!

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Far more tasteful than that, but I see what you're seeing.  I see a bit of previous Ford Edge Sport in there too. 

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shame about that 4-cylinder though... would be nice if they could come up with something with a bit more go...

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shame about that 4-cylinder though... would be nice if they could come up with something with a bit more go...

 

Well they do have a 3.0L V6 available on the GT.

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shame about that 4-cylinder though... would be nice if they could come up with something with a bit more go...

Well they do have a 3.0L V6 available on the GT.

yes but this 4 cylinder is rather outclassed by most other engines for vehicles this size.

The Outlander fills a mostly abandoned niche though, it feels about the same size as the old Pathfinder and old old Chevy Blazer. It feels more "traditional SUV" than the new Crossovers do since the new crossovers have a decidedly more Mommy-Van feel to them these days.

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Would be nice if they had a perky Turbo 4, Diesel and Hybrid for this auto. Your right I see what you mean about the Ford Edge Sport also.

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People aren't aware of how inexpensive these are to buy. And if you check, the mpg is not bad. It also has a 3rd row and a sliding second row so the cargo area is large and versatile.

Sure the engine is not bleeding edge or tire smoking.....but now that we are seeing tiny overstressed motors all over these throwbacks may be attractive to those that just want to get around and enjoy the 5/60 BTB and 10-100 Pto warranties that go with it.

For the right price and equipment level I would have no problem with one as daily transport as opposed to a midsize sedan. ....local dealer was selling new front drivers for about 19,500.....think of families on a budget that can't afford say, a loaded Highlander. With the good mpg , space , warranty, and general user friendliness, it's hard to get too judgmental about this type of thing not trying to be cutting edge.

Compare this to an Equinox for example. Less money, third row, more warranty....

Interesting tidbit. The outlander is larger than the outlander sport but they share a platform and wheelbase. The outlander has always had the 2.4. They just finally added the 2.4 to the outlander sport option sheet. But in the outlander sport, the 2.4 gets noticeably less mpg than it does in the outlander for the sams powertrain more or less.....go figure.

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