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William Maley

Toyota News: Toyota's Australian Branch Wants the Tundra

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It seems America isn't the only place that is interested in the Toyota Tundra. CarAdvice.com.au reports there is “enormous demand” for the Tundra in Australia. Speaking with Tony Cramb, Toyota AU's executive director of sales and marketing said there was room for a larger truck. But there are two key items withholding the Tundra from the Australian marketplace.

 

“We have an enormous demand for a Tundra here in Australia, there’s no doubt if we could get a diesel Tundra, then I think we’d sell 100 a month. But regrettably because it’s manufactured in the States, it’s unlikely to happen that way," said Cramb

 

“… We’ve had strong requests at dealer meetings to get the Tundra here, and we have made representation. But when it comes down to it, because it’s not LHD here, and because it’s petrol, in the end it’s very hard to make the case.”

 

For now, those who are interested in buying a Tundra in Australia can visit an importer and pick up one for around 120,000 AUD (about $94,000).

 

Source: CarAdvice.com.au


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:yikes:  $94,000 for this Turd! Way better full size trucks than the Tundra for less coin. That price is crazy stupid.

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$94,000?! Leave it and stick with the utes, convert them for off-roading and save some money.

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Given that Toyota generally does not make diesel engines for any of its consumer products, it will still be just a dream for any Aussies who want a Tundra.  GM should send the Colorado/Canyon down there with a diesel option.  Maybe the SIlverado too.

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Makes me wonder what the truck selection down there is really like...

 

Mostly Midsize trucks - Ford Ranger, Holden Colorado, Mitsubishi Triton, Nissan Navara, Toyota HiLux.. I think there are some other competitors from India and China.

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in other news: "100 a month" is enormous demand?

 

For a full-size truck in Australia? Yes.

Ram will be sending some of their trucks - 2500/3500 models I think - later in the year.

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in other news: "100 a month" is enormous demand?

 

For a full-size truck in Australia? Yes.

Ram will be sending some of their trucks - 2500/3500 models I think - later in the year.

 

You would think with the terrain there that the demand would be higher.  But maybe the versatility of the smaller trucks serves them better?

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in other news: "100 a month" is enormous demand?

 

 

My thinking as well...

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People want what they cannot have. That said, there is a lot of imported late model F150's and Ram's on the roads here.

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Sounds kind of expensive for 94,000$ in my opinion. Only die hard tundra fans would want to pick one up and in my opinion, that would be less than 100 a month.

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in other news: "100 a month" is enormous demand?

 

For a full-size truck in Australia? Yes.

Ram will be sending some of their trucks - 2500/3500 models I think - later in the year.

 

You would think with the terrain there that the demand would be higher.  But maybe the versatility of the smaller trucks serves them better?

 

 

Probably fuel prices. The lack of light-duty diesels in most of the 1/2 ton pickups (only the Ram has one) is probably the biggest issue down there.   It would be a good opportunity for Ram except they can barely keep up the supply of diesels for the US as it is. 

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in other news: "100 a month" is enormous demand?

 

For a full-size truck in Australia? Yes.

Ram will be sending some of their trucks - 2500/3500 models I think - later in the year.

 

You would think with the terrain there that the demand would be higher.  But maybe the versatility of the smaller trucks serves them better?

 

 

Probably fuel prices. The lack of light-duty diesels in most of the 1/2 ton pickups (only the Ram has one) is probably the biggest issue down there.   It would be a good opportunity for Ram except they can barely keep up the supply of diesels for the US as it is. 

 

If that's the case, the new Titan diesel could be a huge hit if they got it down there.  Full sized truck, but not all the way to being a 3/4 ton with a Cummins diesel?  That might just hit the spot.

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in other news: "100 a month" is enormous demand?

 

For a full-size truck in Australia? Yes.

Ram will be sending some of their trucks - 2500/3500 models I think - later in the year.

 

You would think with the terrain there that the demand would be higher.  But maybe the versatility of the smaller trucks serves them better?

 

 

Probably fuel prices. The lack of light-duty diesels in most of the 1/2 ton pickups (only the Ram has one) is probably the biggest issue down there.   It would be a good opportunity for Ram except they can barely keep up the supply of diesels for the US as it is. 

 

If that's the case, the new Titan diesel could be a huge hit if they got it down there.  Full sized truck, but not all the way to being a 3/4 ton with a Cummins diesel?  That might just hit the spot.

 

 

Perhaps, but it still might be too much engine for the Aussies who are fuel conscious. The Titan XD is a 5.0 liter V8 turbo-diesel with 555 lb-ft of torque.   Now if there were a 6-cylinder turbo diesel, I'm sure that would light their barbie.... 

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