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21 hours ago, trinacriabob said:

And also because the mindset and value system seems very similar to the one in Southern California.

Many people think that.  But a lot of the locals are not that cool.  It's the natural beauty and the temperate climate that I enjoyed.  The weather didn't really get me down - time for coffee somewhere and a good book! 

It seemed like some of the long-term locals were easily rattled by anything that was off color or slightly politically incorrect.  The transplants rolled with it, or even enjoyed that sort of stuff. 

The PacNW is a little more attuned and receptive to NorCal.  A little.  It is definitely not attuned to a SoCal mentality.

I once bought one of these at the Inclined Tower in Montreal.

Haha.  Where do you find this stuff?!?

Dude where did you live around here, as one born and raised here, yes we have the redneck uneducated idiots around the military base in Tacoma and Bremerton, but except for the extremism of narrow minded thinking people in those areas, over all a very multi-cultural embracing all society here. Way better than the year plus I lived in Texas and had to leave due to how extreme the racism is by both white and black against anything that is not one of those two colors and comes into their own self segregated spaces.

Not wanting to get political, but am honestly interested on where you feel the locals were not cool? 🤔

10 hours ago, daves87rs said:

Yuck!

While I do love Fondue and cheese dips that are made from real cheese, this looks like a bowl of melted Velveeta cheese. Nothing but 100% chemical garbage. :puke:

@oldshurst442 There is an Idea, have a real cheese sauce to dip your dogs in at your place. ;) 

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27 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

That definitely sounds like the PNW. 

Not to be political, but we are all Americans. I have tons of friends of every political, religious, and racial group. 

It varies by area in each state also. One of the people I know through college debate is a young Muslim college student. She loved her particualr small town in Texas, found it very open and welcoming, but hates living in California which she finds astonishingly bigoted and intolerant. 

I tend towards depression, so I find the good in people from everywhere. One of my favorite youtube oodworks, two actually,a re from Texas. Stopping briefly in Dallas when iI fly back from the PNW next week. I don't have the emotional energy to hate people any more. 

 

Looking forward to meeting David, I want to meet TC Bob, almost met ccap41 when I was in St Louis for a debate tournament. 

 

All of you are of different geographical and political stripes, and I dealy appreciate all of the folks here at C and G. 

From the Wall of the Starliner Diner, a local restaurant that serves Cuban and other fare. 

May be art

Food at Starliner is fantastic. 

May be an image of food

May be an image of one or more people and text that says '"Good afternoon ladies. What can I start you off with today? Coffee? Cocktails? The manager?" 2,7 m 231 comentários 2M partilhas Gosto Comentar Partilhar Karen Mac This is not funny AবনA'

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I've lived in quite a few states and overseas.  Yes, people are different everywhere you go.  It can vary within the city, the county, the state, and the country.  But what I've seen is that you either click with a place or you don't.

I was hesitant to move to Atlanta for a job in my twenties because it was "the South."  After 4 months, I felt great about being there and felt welcome.

Then, when I lived near Seattle, I did not feel that welcome.  Their accent is generic West Coast, like what I speak.  I was friends with a few transplants.  But getting the "go back to California" vibe from even a few people was not cool.  I even got it when opening up a bank account, and in a suit.  It was all going smoothly until the question "place of birth" came up.  

So, these experiences can be like an on-off switch and you won't easily forget them.

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3 minutes ago, trinacriabob said:

I've lived in quite a few states and overseas.  Yes, people are different everywhere you go.  It can vary within the city, the county, the state, and the country.  But what I've seen is that you either click with a place or you don't.

I was hesitant to move to Atlanta for a job in my twenties because it was "the South."  After 4 months, I felt great about being there and felt welcome.

Then, when I lived near Seattle, I did not feel that welcome.  Their accent is generic West Coast, like what I speak.  I was friends with a few transplants.  But getting the "go back to California" vibe from even a few people was not cool.  I even got it when opening up a bank account, and in a suit.  It was all going smoothly until the question "place of birth" came up.  

So, these experiences can be like an on-off switch and you won't easily forget them.

I loved Atlanta also. 

 

May be an image of road and text that says 'ROUGH ROAD FASTEN BRA STRAPS REMOVE DENTURES'

This is also exactly how I feel. 

 

May be an image of 1 person, beard, motorcycle and text that says 'SOMETIMES THOSE WHO DON'T SOCIALIZE MUCH AREN'T ANTI SOCIAL... THEY JUST HAVENO TOLERANCE FOR DRAMA, STUPIDITY, AND FAKE ASS PEOPLE.'

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@A Horse With No Name Yes same here, looking forward to meeting you too.

@trinacriabob Let me give you a late apology for those idiots as that is not the PNW way. Always been a stopping point for the Asian rim and as one married to a Korean, living daily in a multi-cultural environment, it is always important to include everyone. I do agree with you and others who have stated that it does vary from area to area.  Hopefully next time your out this way, it will be a far more warm and embracing feeling.

I can say, I have had to over the last decade correct my own parents who were California transplants form being negative about others moving here. Weird, but I think it is part generational also along with education and openness to new ideas.

Extroverts are far more embracing of all compared to introverts.

Everyone have a Great HUMP DAY!!!

Girl Smile GIF by MOODMAN

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maybe after all this time, 

for those wanting a performance oriented car with utility, maybe the PONTIAC RAGEOUS was what we really should be looking at, almost 25 years later???

 

all the liabilities of the Camaro as a daily driver / practicality, 4 doors, and for winter places if AWD would be taken care of here.

Imagine the trip to Lowe's with the hatchback and folding seat....maybe even able to haul drywall

https://www.motor1.com/news/95302/pontiac-rageous/

 

1997-pontiac-rageous-concept.jpg

1997-pontiac-rageous-concept.jpg

 

 

1997-pontiac-rageous-concept.jpg

 

1997-pontiac-rageous-concept.jpg

 

 

1997-pontiac-rageous-concept.jpg

 

 

Edited by regfootball
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26 minutes ago, balthazar said:

The Rageous was my first ‘falling out of love’ experience with Pontiac.

I had the opposite effect. 

I always loved Pontiac, but the Rageous only solidified my love for Pontiac THAT much more. 

The Pontiacs that questioned my love for the brand were these:

Pontiac Sunbird Coupe 1980 images

1984 Pontiac Bonneville Brougham | Pontiac bonneville, Pontiac, Oldsmobile

1997-05 Pontiac Trans Sport/Montana | Consumer Guide Auto

 

 

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^ Granted... however at the concept car level, there was still a 'quotient of dreaming'. The Rageous killed that for me.

I'm a Pontiac guy, but with a handful of exceptions- I'm out after '79.

Edited by balthazar
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I couldnt possibly be out by 1979 as I was just starting out in being a car guy.  A tad earlier than '79. But I was just 6 years old then.  

My dad's '70 GTO and  a neighbor's '76 Trans Am were one of the first cars that I loved.  The General Lee too, but we are talking about Pontiac.  Then in 1979, the new look Trans Am came out and I was hooked forever as a Pontiac guy.    There were other Pontiacs in my neighborhood (from the '70s) that had 'that' look that made Pontiac such an exciting brand. 

But...the first car that I disliked was that Sunbird that I posted.  When I saw the Pontiac arrowhead on it, I do remember looking at it and thinking to my little self, WTF?  Obviously not in those words...but the sentiment of WTF was there.

Then the '80s came...and my love for the 3rd gen Trans Am was as strong as the love I had for the '76 and the '79.  The Bandit T/A was not a favorite...I merely liked it. I preferred the years outside of '77-'78.  But when I saw that Bonneville as a new Pontiac, I wasnt too thrilled.  But the Grand Prixs made me kinda forget about that Bonneville.  The FWD Pontiacs of the '80s never had a negative impact on me.  Only because I really didnt know what I was really missing in the RWD Pontiacs of the '60s...   I loved the way the excess styling of late '80s Pontiacs were.  

Then came the weirdness of GM in 1990.  As long as Pontiac had the Trans Am and had made the 4rth gen so adolescent looking that I sooooo ,oved about it, I didnt care what shytty cars Pontiac was peddling.   I loved the W-Body GP, I loved both gens of the FWD Bonnevilles and I also kinda liked the Dustbuster minivan. And my favorite was the plastic bodycladded Pontiac version.  But when Pontiac decided to sell the 2nd gen, I started questioning Pontiac's direction.  And then the Rageous came out immediatley right after and I said to myself..."OK, Pontiac is serious again in making muscle machines!  I want!"      Only for it to be just a concept...

Edited by oldshurst442
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No no; not 1979 the calendar year -- 1979 the model year. But I was already into '50-60s Pontiacs either way then.
I bought my '64 GP in '86, and I had 'officially' tried to buy a '59 Catalina Vista in '81 (tho too young to drive / my dad said 'no way').

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Yeah...I knew that about you.  I forgot.   (That you were into  '50s and '60s Pontiacs when you were a teen in the '70s) 

I did calendar year for me as I wasnt as advanced as you were in recognizing what and who you were about cars.  

I came to that mindset when I was in my late '20s.  However, I did like '50s and '60s cars in my teens, I also liked the cars IN my teens and in my '20s as well which would be cars in the '80s and '90s respectively.  I only started preferring the classics cars over the currents in my late 20s which would be the late '90s.   

 

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Watching the Golden Nights-Habs game. 

Camera is films Vegas folk in and around their arena...in Vegas...

I sees plenty, and I mean plenty of Habs  fans wearing their Habs jerseys around.  A family of Habs fans posing for a photo while the TV camera man also captures the moment. 

I dont know whether to be proud or vomit... 

 

THERE! 

 Now I could be proud of both the Habs jersey on TV AND the fact that I HATE the Habs!!! 

PS:  I must admit...it warms me that soooooo out west like that and folk, American folk,  cheer for a team from Montreal!  

Edited by oldshurst442
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I personally am a model year '66, so I turned 13 in '79.
I was drawing cars probably since I was around 6. I got heavily into them around '78-79.

So... you're 13, you're getting into cars, the current brand new one is on the left, and the one on the right is still only 10 years old... and they're still around. The '69 looks 1000 times better... then you look up the power/performance figures, and it's game over. 260 CI V8 vs. 455 - are you kidding?The gas shortage tried to get rid of them, but circa '80 the 60s stuff was already mostly in enthusiast's hands and getting appreciated especially in contrast to new cars. I'm not sure such a young used car ever made an 'about face' in interest/value in 10 years ever (before or since), but the '79-into the 80s cars PUSHED enthusiasts right back to the mid 60s-early 70s stuff. 

Musclecars began to take off circa '85-89; there were multiple publications focusing on them. I remember my brother (7 yrs younger) and I laying on the floor, paging thru MuscleCar Review the afternoon each issue hit the mailbox. Now he has a '65 GTO, '68 Firebird, '71 GTO (his first car... ironically 7 yrs younger than my 1st car), and a '69 Firebird project car he's building with his step-son.

I 'grew up' around the late 70s-late 80s stuff, but I never had more than a passing interest in them.   

Screen Shot 2021-06-16 at 9.01.12 PM.png

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4 hours ago, balthazar said:

The Rageous was my first ‘falling out of love’ experience with Pontiac.

The styling was bad.  I do think if the Camaro, or a new model similar to it, went back to a hatchback design with a spacious cargo hold like the rageous, and all wheel drive option were out there. It would be a neat unique market offering. Or, maybe a non cadillac version of the escala?

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