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GT350R at GoodWood Festival of Speed

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So bad-arsed in every way.

 

I could care less if this thing is in last place at the track, because it's looks and sound trump everything else.

 

Luckily for Ford fans, last place is not in this thing's lexicon. :thumbsup:

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If anyone was concerned about lack of torque in a small-ish 5.2L NA engine, then watching this thing try to launch through the first few gears, even with those steam roller tires, should calm that concern right down.

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I can't stop watching this video.  So much awesomeness! 

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