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William Maley

Ram News: Ram Trucks' Head Sees An Opportunity For A Midsize Truck

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Sergio Marchionne isn't the only person who is interested in doing a midsize truck for Ram. Speaking with The Detroit News, Jeep and Ram Trucks' CEO Mike Manley says he sees an opportunity.

 

“I think there’s opportunity there in the U.S. if you look at what’s happened in the mid-size segment here – significant growth last year. I think that space is big enough, certainly, to have two offerings there,” said Manley.

 

One of the two offerings is the upcoming Jeep Wrangler pickup due next year. Manley said he doesn't believe there will be overlap in terms of buyers who want the Jeep or a possible Ram truck.

 

Manley admitted that Ram could use a Fiat platform for a new midsize truck. A possible candidate for this is the new Fiat Toro pickup sold in South America, although it is quite small. The Toro is about 20 inches shorter than the Chevrolet Colorado.

 

Source: The Detroit News


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Toro is a Compact truck and that is what RAM and JEEP should do, NOT a Mid size truck. The market has enough mid sizes, a Compact is what the market really needs.

 

Stop trying to copy GM, Blaze the trail with a Compact Pickup.

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Bring back a Dakota -sized truck with upgrade!

Do the same with the Durango -- current offerings are too bloated to be useful !

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There is also the Fiat Fullback sold in some markets, based on the Mitsubishi compact truck...could be used for a Ram 50 revival ;)

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The elephant in the room is a RAM, version of the Jeep Pickup truck, same chassis, but the RAM version for goes the extreme off road Jeep Suspension,  and RAM versions gets its OWN body work.

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WOW, Could Fiat make a truck any uglier?

 

post-12-0-47104500-1460148720_thumb.jpg

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Make the nose squarer, double the grille size and name it the Ram 50..

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Is it me or does the wheelbase look awkward? Like.. the rear wheel needs to more back some. 

Yes, typical on-the-cheap Asian market truck where they cram the extended cab and crew cab on the same wheelbase..

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Is it me or does the wheelbase look awkward? Like.. the rear wheel needs to more back some. 

Yes, typical on-the-cheap Asian market truck where they cram the extended cab and crew cab on the same wheelbase..

 

Okay, making sure it wasn't just my eyes. It looks overall, terrible. But honestly, not all that far off from looking good. The biggest thing to me that that wheelbase issue. 

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