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Manual Trans, Woman versus Men! Are Men becoming soft?

Transmission Choice  

7 members have voted

  1. 1. Which Transmission do you prefer?

    • Manual, traditional clutch
      2
    • Manual, Electrohydraulic
      0
    • Automatic
      2
    • Automatic with manual shift mode
      0
    • Automatic with Paddle shift
      3


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G. David Felt
Staff Writer Alternative Energy - www.CheersandGears.com

 

Manual Trans, Woman versus Men! Are Men becoming soft?

 

Came across this story on Autoblog. After more than 50,000+ leases reviewed at swapalease.com shows that woman more than men enjoy driving a manual trans. Sadly this seems to point to the save the manual campaign as failing as manual auto purchases are a dying breed.

 

According to the data, leases on Manual auto's have dropped by 22%. In 2012 85.4% of Manual Trans leases were by men, 2015 that number had dropped to 81.2%. Woman on the other hand in 2012 was 14.6% of their leases were a manual transmission but in 2015 that number has rose to 18.8%.

 

Now more and more editorials are clarifying that as a road trip car, manuals are more fun, but as a daily driver for work, they are terrible.

 

So what do you guys think. Is this a trend that Manuals could disappear from the roads of North America in the near future or will they survive but only in select performance based auto's or what?

 

Sound Off

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2 Votes so far.

 

100% for paddles.

 

Look, I think we're all just getting really lazy.

Or busy...  manuals are great for pleasure driving in the countryside, but in the real world with coffee cups, food, cell phones, etc automatics make more sense in the daily grind in cities and suburbia...

 

I like manuals, had them in daily drivers for over 14 years and in secondary cars for 8 years after that..but today, there are so few available--besides sports cars and coupes, they are usually only available in stripped down econoboxes.   The kinds of vehicles I like and would likely buy tend to be all automatics...I'm sure I'm not the only one that likes manuals but finds the selection pretty slim. 

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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It really depends.. as my daily I think I'm done having a stick but as a second car I ONLY want it to be a stick. I find early in the morning or at night I'm tired and I don't feel like shifting, then comes the traffic or little bit of city driving I do and I don't want a stick for that crap. 

 

^ What Molty said! 

 

I'm actually "going though" that situation now(friend is looking to buy, not me) He wants a Tiguan(for whatever reason) but his vehicles HAVE to be a manual. The only way he can get that combination is for a super stripped down one. You can't get a manual trans in the most common engine/interior packages. 

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I have to agree, both my kids learned to drive manuals but work and live in the city so auto's they have especially with all the hills around Seattle. I love manuals but find with everything else going on in life, auto's are the best solution and the manual is what I would want for a cruiser weekend auto. Sadly what limited selection there is has be reduced to having auto's in everything now.

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I'd also like to say that with an auto I definitely want a "manual" ability and I'd rather it not be a stupid button like my Escape's, but a button vs paddles wouldn't stop me from buying it, just a preference. 

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The times I've driven automatics w/ paddles or a 'manual mode' I've found myself not bothering to use them..the novelty of paddle shift wears off after about 5 min...maybe in a sports car I'd find them interesting, but in the grind they just seem pointless..with an automatic, I put it in D and away I go...I like the dash knob that is appearing on some Chrysler products, and the classic column shift, both approaches are better than a floor shift that wastes console space that could be better used for more cubbies...

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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The times I've driven automatics w/ paddles or a 'manual mode' I've found myself not bothering to use them..the novelty of paddle shift wears off after about 5 min...maybe in a sports car I'd find them interesting, but in the grind they just seem pointless..with an automatic, I put it in D and away I go...I like the dash knob that is appearing on some Chrysler products, and the classic column shift, both approaches are better than a floor shift that wastes console space that could be better used for more cubbies...

The only time I use mine and I've said it here before(probably in my Escape thread) is when merging onto the interstate. And that is only on the longer on ramps that wil bend and twist a couple of times so you get up to about 45-50mph and hold it until you can acclerate more. Well my Escape will see that as "okay, we're staying at 50mph..6th gear it is" Well I'll hold it in 4th or 5th just for that little section then once I'm up to speed I put it back in regular "drive". 

 

But I completely agree with you. Once you use it a few times you realize how it is more inconvenient than practical and just leave it in D. 

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First off, let me start by saying I think these numbers are deceiving. I'm in the car business, and have been for many years as many of you know. I don't believe for one second these numbers are indicative of a trend as a whole.

 

The vehicles in question, along with the fact that these numbers are only one leases, among other things, mean this is only a small piece of a much, much larger puzzle. In general, women are NOT buying/leasing more manual vehicles than men.

 

Now, to answer the question at hand. In general, I prefer manuals. In the vast majority of instances, I think the manual is more enjoyable to drive. In some cases, I feel like the automatic option downright kills the car- Miata, FR-S/BRZ, Corvette, Camaro, WRX, and many, many others. There are some exceptions, however. In some applications, I'd rather have an automatic- Hellcat, M5, trucks, etc.

 

Manuals are definitely dying off, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Not enough people buy them, so manufacturers build less of them, so even fewer people buy them. So it's a problem that perpetuates itself. 

 

I would have preferred a manual in my GTI, but I wasn't willing to sacrifice some other features to get a manual, so I compromised. It helps that the DSG is such a good automatic. If it weren't I wouldn't have been so open-minded. When I get my full-on toy for myself though, make no mistake it WILL be a manual.

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I dont like manual transmissions.

Im more of the cruising type. When I want speed I just mash the peddle.

Right gear at the right time for me is:  P R N D L

Put in in gear and lets go! Just drive.

 

Where to?

Dont know....just DRIVE. We will know where when we get there!

Sometimes its low and slow:

 

Sometimes its a tad more vigorous:

It's 106 miles to Chicago, we got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark... and we're wearing sunglasses.

 

 

 

 

 

Just to say though....I HATE automatic paddle shifters, (The button crap that is on the Fusion...dont let me get started on that....)

Got those on the Acura....NEVER use them!

 

If one wants to row his own gears....get a DAMN MANUAL transmission....none of this SISSY automatic paddle bullshyte.

It works for Formula F1....we arent Ayrton Senna, Jacques or Gilles Villeuneuve on the circuit....we are on public roads....

A TRUE manual guy SHIFTS his own gears....

Its just like those coffee guys....with their latte bullshyte...

Drink Turkish(Greek) coffee or a real cappuccino...or if you want American....drink it BLACK!

POINT PHOKING FINALE!!!!!!!!!!

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I have the same stupid button on my Escape.. I hate it. I like the option to downshift in the rare situation that I want to be down a gear but it's never to hoon the car. It's also inconvenient because I leave it in D but to be able to switch gears you have to shift to S THEN use the super mcduper cool switch(sarcasm).

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I love driving stick but in the last year I went from driving 43 miles one way with no traffic to driving 12 miles or so in city traffic. Greatly reduced commute but the times you get stuck in traffic or weather the stick REALLY sucks.  I'd love to have a stick for a toy vehicle and have the daily driver and long trip car now be automatic for awhile again.  

 

I learned on a stick (thanks Dad) and have had sticks available to me to drive about 1/2 of the time now in my 32-33 driving years.  My sister who is older than me still drives stick as well.

 

My clutch knee is acting up on me these days and when you are stalled in snow traffic at mostly a standstill and your knee starts 'clicking' and popping some, i think its ok for me to maybe go automatic for awhile.

 

Not every car should be a stick.  Manufs should only put a stick in a few of their vehicles but make them high quality shifter and clutch.

 

As for GM they should only put sticks in 

 

Cadillac ATS (you MIGHT talk me into the CTS)

Buick Verano (I love the Regal stick but admit no ones really gonna want it anymore)

Chevy Cruze and Sonic (I'd get rid of it on the Spark even) and Camaro of course

Chevy pickups in limited application

 

what else am I missing for GM, I don't really foresee demand for any other GM models and stick.

Edited by regfootball

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Here's a stark reality.

 

There's never...never going to be a standard transmission electric car...

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Here's a stark reality.

 

There's never...never going to be a standard transmission electric car...

A manual wouldn't make sense w/ an electric motor...

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Here's a stark reality.

 

There's never...never going to be a standard transmission electric car...

I posted an electric corvette build a month or two ago that still used a 6spd tranny. I believe they set a record for top speed for an electric car or something. I'll try and find it.

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http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/videos/a28405/the-fastest-street-legal-electric-car-is-a-chevrolet-corvette/

Sorry I couldn't make it an active link from my phone aaaaand I realize this isn't an OEM car but I think as long as they can keep a manual trans in electric vehicles they can make good enthusiast cars without petroleum.

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Interesting..I didn't think a manual could work with an electric motor, given the nature of electric power delivery (production electric cars have essentially 1-spd transmissions?)

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Yeah production cars all have 1spd transmissions as far as I know. Not exactly sure how or why..I should look into that. Now I'm curious why not more gears.. I mean less rpm means more efficient..right..? Obviously the rpms aren't used quite the same but you'd think it could be made more efficient with more ratios. Just thinking and typing at the same time. Lol

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I love driving stick but in the last year I went from driving 43 miles one way with no traffic to driving 12 miles or so in city traffic. Greatly reduced commute but the times you get stuck in traffic or weather the stick REALLY sucks.  I'd love to have a stick for a toy vehicle and have the daily driver and long trip car now be automatic for awhile again.  

 

I learned on a stick (thanks Dad) and have had sticks available to me to drive about 1/2 of the time now in my 32-33 driving years.  My sister who is older than me still drives stick as well.

 

My clutch knee is acting up on me these days and when you are stalled in snow traffic at mostly a standstill and your knee starts 'clicking' and popping some, i think its ok for me to maybe go automatic for awhile.

 

Not every car should be a stick.  Manufs should only put a stick in a few of their vehicles but make them high quality shifter and clutch.

 

As for GM they should only put sticks in 

 

Cadillac ATS (you MIGHT talk me into the CTS)

Buick Verano (I love the Regal stick but admit no ones really gonna want it anymore)

Chevy Cruze and Sonic (I'd get rid of it on the Spark even) and Camaro of course

Chevy pickups in limited application

 

what else am I missing for GM, I don't really foresee demand for any other GM models and stick.

 

 

Umm......Corvette?

 

SS replacement should also offer a manual, as should the Colorado. Spark, as well.

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Speaking of SS.... My local Chevy dealer has a black SS.  :thumbsup:  :yikes:  :pbjtime:  :gitfunky:  :smilewide:  :omfg:  :metal:  :bowdown:  :D  :o  :yes:  :mind-blowing:  :drool:  :lovey: (over the top? Maybe.. but it is the car us enthusiasts asked for.. sedan for our families, corvette powered, manual trans, rwd.) 

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My local dealer has 2 new 16's. A silver one, and one in that gorgeous new blue. And they're both goddamm autotragics.

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http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/videos/a28405/the-fastest-street-legal-electric-car-is-a-chevrolet-corvette/

Sorry I couldn't make it an active link from my phone aaaaand I realize this isn't an OEM car but I think as long as they can keep a manual trans in electric vehicles they can make good enthusiast cars without petroleum.

 

:metal: That freakin Rocks and I love the Jet sound it puts out! :metal:

 

:wub:

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