FordCosworth

FORD RECYCLES ENOUGH ALUMINUM TO BUILD 30,000 F-150 BODIES EVERY MONTH

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FordCosworth    128

Ford recycles as much as 20 million pounds of aluminum stamping scrap per month using the closed-loop system at Dearborn Truck Plant, which builds F-150. That is the equivalent of more than 30,000 F-150 bodies in the largest configuration – a SuperCrew body including doors, plus hood, tailgate and 6.5-foot cargo box.

 

Opting for aluminum over steel in new automobile construction is the best way to reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions, according to Oak Ridge National Lab.

 

Recycled aluminum avoids 95 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with primary aluminum production. It uses significantly less energy and water – another reason Ford F-150 leads the full-size truck pack in terms of lifetime carbon footprint, according to Automotive Science Group.         

Weight savings from aluminum alloy helps F-150 reduce its lifetime emissions compared to the previous steel-body version. Between 30 percent and 40 percent of a typical aluminum coil is turned into scrap in the stamping process. This is recycled into new metal for the truck using the closed-loop system.

 

https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2016/04/22/ford-recycles-enough-aluminum-to-build-30000-f150-bodies.html

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ccap41    1,161

So in a month there is enough scrap to produce 30,000 trucks. How many trucks are built to produce that scrap, I wonder? I guess if 30% is wasted then it's about 100,000 trucks built + 30,000 worth of scrap so in building 100,000 trucks the have enough aluminum for 130,000 trucks, right?  Does that sound about right or am I way off?  

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El Kabong    273

Replace "aluminum" with "steel" and you have a pretty accurate description of any automaker's operations. Oshawa Stamping used to have torrents of steel pouring out of the bottom of the presses seven days a week.

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dfelt    1,763

WOW, sounds like we could use some enhanced stamping that does not waste so much steel / aluminum. Deming and Drucker were right about inefficient lazy workers costing companies millions.

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Suaviloquent    713

WOW, sounds like we could use some enhanced stamping that does not waste so much steel / aluminum. Deming and Drucker were right about inefficient lazy workers costing companies millions.

 

In what way can you reduce scrap so it doesn't exist?

 

I've toured some plants now, and they're some tight run ships. The new Ford truck plant, the SHAP facility and Honda plant come to mind recently.

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ccap41    1,161

WOW, sounds like we could use some enhanced stamping that does not waste so much steel / aluminum. Deming and Drucker were right about inefficient lazy workers costing companies millions.

I don't think it even matters because it is all being reused. If it weren't reused I would completely agree but all of the scrap gets reused anyway and I would think with an operation pumping out millions of vehicle a year would probably already have a pretty efficient method of stamping, but that part is just speculation.

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El Kabong    273

WOW, sounds like we could use some enhanced stamping that does not waste so much steel / aluminum. Deming and Drucker were right about inefficient lazy workers costing companies millions.

Not sure if sarcasm...

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dfelt    1,763

There are always better ways to cut and stamp steel / aluminum. While today what they do might seem very efficient, there could be even better ways to stamp off roles rather than sheets etc. there is always room to improve and based on the comment above about how much scrap FORD is doing with their aluminum, that is what I wonder if we are dealing with lazy workers, inefficient process, inefficient machines, etc.

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Suaviloquent    713

There are always better ways to cut and stamp steel / aluminum. While today what they do might seem very efficient, there could be even better ways to stamp off roles rather than sheets etc. there is always room to improve and based on the comment above about how much scrap FORD is doing with their aluminum, that is what I wonder if we are dealing with lazy workers, inefficient process, inefficient machines, etc.

 

Ford did a complete redesign of their two truck plants. They're bound to be some of the most efficient plants in the world.

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