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William Maley

VW News: Rumorpile: Volkswagen Considers Trimming Their Worldwide Lineup

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How many models does the entire Volkswagen group sell around the world? 75? 125? How about 340 models. No that isn't a misprint. According to German business paper Handelsblatt, that is the amount all of the brands of the German automaker build. CEO Matthias Müller believes that is too many.

 

"The total number of our today around 340 model variants, we are in the course of reducing," Volkswagen CEO Matthias Müller at a press conference last week.

 

But how many models are going on the chopping block? Sources tell Handelsblatt that 40 plus models will be cut.

 

"A decision on how many models will be phased out or ceased has not been taken yet," said a Volkswagen spokesman to Reuters when asked for comment.

 

Source: Handelsblatt (Subscription Required) Reuters


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340 models, they could greatly increase profitability by reducing that number in half to 170 models. Then also retire low volume versions.

 

Wonder how this stacks up against the other OEM builders? Anyone have those figures quickly available?

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340 models, they could greatly increase profitability by reducing that number in half to 170 models. Then also retire low volume versions.

 

Wonder how this stacks up against the other OEM builders? Anyone have those figures quickly available?

 

Not at the moment. I'm doing some digging to see if there is anything.

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