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William Maley

Holden Releases Details On the Next, Insignia-Based Commodore

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As we have known for a couple of years, the next Holden Commodore will not be a rear-wheel drive based model. Instead, it will be based on the next-generation Opel and Vauxhall Insignia. This model isn't due to come out till 2018, but Holden has surprised everyone by releasing key details about the next Commodore.

Holden has been working with Opel and Vauxhall for the past five years on developing the Insignia for its duties as the Commodore in Australia. In terms of looks, Holden has not messed with or changed the Insignia's design. It will look the same as the European and North American models (Buick Regal). No sedan will be offered, only a five-door liftback and wagon.

There will be two turbocharged four-cylinder engines on offer - gas and diesel. No displacement or power figures were given. We do know this engines will be paired with front-wheel drive. A 3.6L V6 producing 306 horsepower and 273 pound-feet of torque will power the flagship model - likely the Commodore SS. This will come paired with a nine-speed automatic and a torque-vectoring all-wheel-drive system. According to media reports, Holden pushed for the V6 and all-wheel drive combination for their requirements. There were rumors of the Commodore getting a twin-turbo V6 - possibly the twin-turbo 3.0L or 3.6L from Cadillac. But that isn't going to happen for a simple reason - it can't fit in the Insignia/Commodore's platform (E2XX). 

Other key details about the next Commodore:

  • The flagship Commodore model will feature adaptive dampers
  • In most dimensions, the new Commodore is smaller than the current model
  • Weight-wise, the new Commodore is 200 to 300 kg (about 441 to 661 pounds) lighter than the current model
  • Holden will be doing their own ride and handling tuning program for the Commodore to better handle the roads and conditions that Australia offers

Will the new Commodore be a success or tarnish a nameplate that has been around since 1978. That's a question that can only be answered in 2018. In the meantime, we have reports from various Australian outlets who were given the chance to drive two prototypes of the next Commodore. 

Source: Holden
First Drive Reports: CarAdvice, Drive.com.au, Motoring.com.au, Wheels
Press Release is on Page 2


Next-Generation Holden Commodore Is Coming

  • First details of Holden’s next-generation Commodore revealed, redefining a four decade legacy
  • First imported Commodore lives up to the legend; V6 flagship boasts 230kW and 370Nm, cutting-edge AWD system and 9-speed transmission  
  • Packed with advanced technology: Active Fuel Management, adaptive suspension, torque-vectoring AWD, matrix lighting system, Apple CarPlay® and Android® Auto
  • Extensive Holden Australian engineering development ensures next-generation Commodore lives up to the legendary nameplate with outstanding driving dynamics  
  • Next-generation Holden Commodore on sale in 2018 

Holden has today revealed first details of the all-new, next-generation Commodore ahead of its Australian launch in early 2018.

Australia’s first look under the bonnet of the cutting-edge new Commodore reveals a car that will set new benchmarks in its segment for technology, style, practicality and driving dynamics.

Headlined by the V6 flagship model, the first ever imported Commodore will honour the legendary nameplate by being the most technologically-advanced Holden ever. With a cutting-edge all-wheel-drive system channeling 230 kilowatts and 370 Newton metres to the road, combined with adaptive suspension technology, a company-first nine-speed automatic transmission and torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, the next-generation Commodore is set to cement the iconic nameplate’s reputation for class-leading driving dynamics and on-road refinement.

Based on General Motor’s new ‘E2’ global architecture, engineered in Germany and shared with the Opel Insignia, the new Commodore has also been co-developed under the expert and watchful eye of Holden’s Australian engineers to ensure the all-new Commodore continues a four-decade tradition of setting new benchmarks.  

“Holden has been engaged in this program from the outset to ensure the next-generation Commodore lives up to its legendary nameplate,” said Jeremy Tassone, Holden’s Engineering Group Manager for Vehicle Development.

“We know the first imported Commodore will come under a lot of scrutiny and we know we have a lot to live up to – this car delivers in spades”

“Although we are remain in the early stages of the Holden development process, this is an absolutely world-class car. We’ve taken a precision-engineered German car and endowed it with Holden DNA. It drives like a Commodore should.

“We’ve had our Holden engineers engaged in this global program from the outset and we’re continuing to do extensive tuning and development, racking up thousands of kilometers, at our Lang Lang proving ground in Victoria to ensure it’s got that Holden magic.

“Of course, it helps that the underlying platform is absolutely world class! This global vehicle program, led by Opel in Germany, has produced a phenomenal base for us to work from. The genuinely cutting-edge all-wheel-drive system using active torque vectoring provides incredible traction and handling finesse. The key is what is dubbed the ‘Twinster’ rear drive module. Essentially, the traditional rear differential has been replaced with two individual clutches that not only save weight and improve packaging but provides virtually instantaneous active distribution of torque to the required wheel.

“The overall system monitors inputs from vehicle sensors 100 times per second and constantly adjusts accordingly, it’s extraordinary.”

The V6 engine with the all-wheel-drive system is a combination that the Holden team drove into the global vehicle program because we know our customers and this performance option is important to them. While it may not be built here, we’ll deliver a Commodore that our customers will love in 2018,” said Mr Tassone.    

Commodore’s evolution reflects the transformation of the Holden brand and company as it moves to full-line importer of vehicles. But just like Commodore, Holden will remain a powerhouse of the industry and of the local motoring landscape. 

“The next-generation Commodore will reset benchmarks in its class, as has every Commodore since 1978,” said Holden’s Executive Director of Sales, Peter Keley.

“What Commodore will also continue to do is carry the family in space and comfort. Commodore will also race in Supercars from 2018 and continue to be on the road as police cars.

“This next-generation vehicle is changing and bringing incredible technology and refinement with it but will continue to offer customers that quintessential Commodore experience they have loved for nearly four decades.  

“With the first-ever imported Commodore, we’re delivering our customers an absolutely world-beating vehicle, with the space, practicality, technology and driving pleasure that Commodore has always provided. This is a different kind of Commodore to what has come before but lives up to the nameplate in every respect and will carry our heritage with pride.”

NEXT-GENERATION COMMODORE KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Next-generation Commodore built in Germany on all-new, global E2 architecture shared with Opel Insignia
  • Lightweight construction methods result in 200kg - 300kg weight savings compared to current Commodore
  • Flagship model offers V6 AWD drivetrain with Holden-first 9-speed transmission
  • V6 engine delivers 230kW / 370Nm while being incredibly efficient thanks to Stop-Start technology and Active Fuel Management
  • 2.0T petrol and 2.0T diesel front-wheel drive models also coming to Australia
  • Liftback and Sportwagon body-styles
  • Cutting-edge, adaptive all-wheel-drive system with torque vectoring and twin-clutch (‘Twinster’) rear differential system
  • Adaptive suspension
  • Next-generation matrix lighting system
  • Infotainment includes:
    • Apple Car Play and Android Auto
    • 8-inch configurable LCD instrument display,
    • next-gen head-up display

Pricing, specification, full details of driver, safety and additional infotainment technology to be confirmed closer to launch  


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I feel this will be a big disappointment to those that have had Commodore SS in the past. going from V8 powered RWD to FWD V6, is not going to deliver the same experience.

Goodluck, your going to need it.

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29 minutes ago, dfelt said:

I feel this will be a big disappointment to those that have had Commodore SS in the past. going from V8 powered RWD to FWD V6, is not going to deliver the same experience.

Goodluck, your going to need it.

I forget where I was reading this - I think it might have been a piece on Wheels - but Holden knows that with this change, they are going to infuriate the hardcore Commodore fans and likely lose them. But with a number of key factors, this was going to happen sooner than later.

Besides, we know from rumors that there is a V8 performance car coming to Holden in the next few years that will serve as the hero vehicle - previously held by the Commodore SS.

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Good to hear that, they should take the Camaro and make it a Halo car for Holden.

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Aussies are buying more and more Toyotas I hear.  Maybe redefining the Commodore means something where it can compete with a Camry and rise above it.

All i gotta say is if the GS version here has the non turbo v6 as its engine, it will hit the market as a dud (the GS).  Twin turbo 6 is the only way to make a splash here now, especially since the MKz has a 400hp ecoboost six now.

This is essentially a Malibu, but nicer and more in the powertrain department.  I can tell you, the chassis is so light and balanced with the 1.5, the 2.0 feels nose heavy...i can't imagine what they have to do to keep it feeling right with a big v6 under the hood.  Maybe the v6 here will be AWd only.

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14 hours ago, regfootball said:

Aussies are buying more and more Toyotas I hear.  Maybe redefining the Commodore means something where it can compete with a Camry and rise above it.

All i gotta say is if the GS version here has the non turbo v6 as its engine, it will hit the market as a dud (the GS).  Twin turbo 6 is the only way to make a splash here now, especially since the MKz has a 400hp ecoboost six now.

This is essentially a Malibu, but nicer and more in the powertrain department.  I can tell you, the chassis is so light and balanced with the 1.5, the 2.0 feels nose heavy...i can't imagine what they have to do to keep it feeling right with a big v6 under the hood.  Maybe the v6 here will be AWd only.

I doubt the next Regal will have the V6. Holden needed it for their market and I highly doubt Buick wants this. As mentioned in the story, Holden wanted to put in a twin-turbo six, but the E2XX platform is too small to fit one in at the moment. Maybe the follow-up model will change this.

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On 2016-10-27 at 7:59 AM, dfelt said:

Good to hear that, they should take the Camaro and make it a Halo car for Holden.

Auzies like their cars with 4 doors. 

The Camaro will not be made into a halo car for Holden. 

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8 hours ago, William Maley said:

I doubt the next Regal will have the V6. Holden needed it for their market and I highly doubt Buick wants this. As mentioned in the story, Holden wanted to put in a twin-turbo six, but the E2XX platform is too small to fit one in at the moment. Maybe the follow-up model will change this.

I'm sure your info is from the right place, but i highly doubt it to some degree; if they can fit a v6 block in there to begin withat that they can't fit turbo plumbing in there.  Could be one of those deals where they wait 2 more years just to be jerks.

Edited by regfootball

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      The front seats were designed with long-distance comfort in mind with a fair amount of seat padding and just the right amount of firmness. Power adjustments for both driver and passenger are standard on the Limited and offer a generous range of adjustments. Space in the back is quite roomy and there are some nice touches such as manual window shades. The Sonata has one of the largest trunks in the class with 16.3 cubic feet of space on offer.
      All Sonata’s come with a 7-inch touchscreen featuring Hyundai’s BlueLink infotainment system. Our test Sonata Limited had the optional 8-inch screen with navigation. The current BlueLink system has been with us for a few years and its interface is beginning to look somewhat dated, but the system is still one of the best when it comes to overall usability with large touchscreen buttons, bright screen, and a simple interface. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard on all Sonatas except the base SE.
      Sonata offers one of the widest range of powertrains in the segment with three gas engines, a hybrid, and plug-in hybrid. Our Sonata Limited came with the base 2.4L inline-four producing 185 horsepower and 178 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic routing power to the front wheels. The engine provides adequate power for around town and rural driving. You will need to step on it when making a pass or merging onto a freeway as torque resides higher in the rev band. The six-speed automatic goes about its business smoothly and always knows what gear it needs to be in. Hyundai does offer an eight-speed automatic, but only if you opt for the turbocharged 2.0L.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the 2018 Sonata Limited are 25 City/35 Highway/28 Combined (SE models see a one mpg increase in highway and combined figures). My average for the week landed around 28.5 mpg.
      Hyundai did make some tweaks to the 2018 Sonata’s suspension including a revised rear suspension setup with thicker trailing arms and revised steering system. The end result is a Sonata that handles much better than the previous car. Body motion has noticeably decreased and the steering provides decent weight when turning. Thankfully, the tweaks made to the suspension haven’t affected the Sonata’s ride quality. Bumps and other road imperfections are soaked up before reaching passengers. Some of the credit has to go to Hyundai not going crazy on offering large wheels - the Limited seen here rides on 17-inch wheels. Road and wind noise are kept to near silent levels.
      My first impression seeing the 2018 Sonata was that Hyundai had improved it, but was still a bit short when compared to the work done by other automakers. Spending a week with the Sonata caused me to change my train of thought; It surprised me how much work Hyundai put into this mid-cycle refresh and brings the Sonata up to the point where I would say it is fighting for best-in-class honors. 
      While the 2018 Sonata may lack most of the pizzazz found in the sixth-generation model, it does show that Hyundai has learned from its mistake and worked to reclaim some of the magic.
      Disclaimer: Hyundai Provided the Sonata, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Hyundai
      Model: Sonata
      Trim: Limited
      Engine: 2.4L GDI DOHC D-CVVT Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic. Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 185 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 178 @ 4,000 
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 25/35/28
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Montgomery, AL
      Base Price: $27,400
      As Tested Price: $31,310 (Includes $885.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Ultimate Package - $2,900.00
      Carpeted Floor Mats - $125.00

      View full article
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