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William Maley

VW News: As the Diesel Emits & Rumorpile: Volkswagen and U.S. Reach An Agreement Over 3.0L TDI V6

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There is some possible good news for owners of Audi, Porsche, and Volkswagen models equipped with the 3.0L TDI V6. Bloomberg has learned from sources that Volkswagen and U.S. environmental regulators have reached an agreement on fixing and buying back vehicles with this engine.

The agreement gives Volkswagen the go-ahead to fix 60,000 vehicles with a software update, while the remaining 20,000 vehicles will need to be bought back because they would be too complex to fix. Avoiding the buyback of all 80,000 vehicles involved in this scandal will save Volkswagen about $4 billion.

"The Court has scheduled a status conference for November 30, 2016 to discuss the matter further. Until that time the Court has ordered that these discussions remain confidential," said Mark Clothier, an Audi spokesman, via email to Roadshow.

Aside from the court, Volkswagen still needs to reach agreements with owners of the 3.0L TDI V6 who have filed suit against the company and the Federal Trade Commission, which has sued Volkswagen for false advertising. Both groups are demanding that Volkswagen offer the buyback option to all owners.

Source: Bloomberg, Roadshow


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VW will be scraping a ton of cars, as not only 20,000 of the 3.0 here, but also a high percentage of the 450,000 2.0 TDI vehicles will hit the crusher.

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This is good news. The 3.0 TDI V6 engine is a sweetheart. I'd love to be able to pick up a TDI Touareg Executive for on the cheap.

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With so many defective auto's, VW will probably try to dump on the 34rd world market and crush the rest and then the era of EV's begins.

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55 minutes ago, dfelt said:

With so many defective auto's, VW will probably try to dump on the 34rd world market and crush the rest and then the era of EV's begins.

They are prohibited by the terms of the settlement from doing this.  Which is why 20,000 of the 3.0 litre vehicles will need to be destroyed.  No way to bring them up to specifications.

With the older 2.0 vehicles they can resell them if they repair them to spec and provide a 4 year emissions warranty.  How many hundred thousand mile plus five year old cars are they going to repair and warranty?

I would bet seventy percent of the buy backs are crushed with the 2.0 motors.

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19 hours ago, A Horse With No Name said:

They are prohibited by the terms of the settlement from doing this.  Which is why 20,000 of the 3.0 litre vehicles will need to be destroyed.  No way to bring them up to specifications.

With the older 2.0 vehicles they can resell them if they repair them to spec and provide a 4 year emissions warranty.  How many hundred thousand mile plus five year old cars are they going to repair and warranty?

I would bet seventy percent of the buy backs are crushed with the 2.0 motors.

I hope your right, I have little trust in VW doing the right thing.

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Just now, dfelt said:

I hope your right, I have little trust in VW doing the right thing.

Agreed....!

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10 hours ago, daves87rs said:

Can't see why all can't be crushed....

Agree, I would think the time to engineer, test, retro fit and cover all the cost would be more than just crushing them and moving forward.

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Hmmmmm....

 

Hmmmmm...

 

It's so bad that these cars just end up being crushed. Would it be more expensive to just build a ton of 1.4T crate engines for the affected 2.0 TDi models, have then installed and then pay the difference in fuel costs to the affected owners?

 

I guess it probably would be. But damn is that just a sheer, utter waste, all on VW really. 

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6 hours ago, Suaviloquent said:

Hmmmmm....

 

Hmmmmm...

 

It's so bad that these cars just end up being crushed. Would it be more expensive to just build a ton of 1.4T crate engines for the affected 2.0 TDi models, have then installed and then pay the difference in fuel costs to the affected owners?

 

I guess it probably would be. But damn is that just a sheer, utter waste, all on VW really. 

Just as long as they recycle....

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6 hours ago, Suaviloquent said:

Hmmmmm....

 

Hmmmmm...

 

It's so bad that these cars just end up being crushed. Would it be more expensive to just build a ton of 1.4T crate engines for the affected 2.0 TDi models, have then installed and then pay the difference in fuel costs to the affected owners?

 

I guess it probably would be. But damn is that just a sheer, utter waste, all on VW really. 

Just think the couple that slip through the cracks and become barn finds in 20 years. :P

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