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William Maley

Quick Drive: 2016 Lexus LX 570

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Most luxury SUVs will never go fully off-road. The closest they’ll ever get is driving down a gravel road. But that doesn’t mean some automakers aren’t filling them with the latest off-road for that one person who decides to. Case in point is the LX 570. Lexus’ variant of the Toyota Land Cruiser has been updated inside and out to try and draw buyers away from the usual suspects in the class.

  • For 2016, Lexus has softened the LX’s boxy-shape with some rounded edges and more imposing fenders. The front grille has grown in size to match other Lexus vehicles, though to our eyes it looks more like the head from a Cylon in the 1980’s Battlestar Galactica tv show. The rear features new taillights and a reshaped tailgate.
  • The interior has somehow become more opulent since the last LX we drove. A new dash design features real wood trim and more soft-touch materials. Our tester featured leather upholstery that can be described as red-orange. At first, I thought it was a bit much. But over the week I grew to like the color as it adds some personality.
  • Sitting in either the front or second-row seats of the LX is a pleasant experience. There is plenty of head and legroom for both rows, along with heat. Front seats also get ventilation as standard. The third-row seat is a bit of joke. Getting back there in the first place is quite difficult due to the small gap when you move the second-row forward. Once back there, you find legroom is almost negligible. Finally, the way the third row folds up by side walls and not into the floor hampers cargo space - only offering 41 cubic feet.
  • Lexus’ Remote Touch interface has arrived in the LX this year with a gargantuan 12.3-inch screen sitting on top of the dash. On the plus side, the screen is vibrant and easy to read. The negative is the remote touch controller as you’ll find yourself choosing the wrong function because the controller is very sensitive to inputs.
  • Power comes from 5.7L V8 with 383 horsepower and 403 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and full-time four-wheel drive system. On paper, the V8 should move the LX 570 with no issue. But a curb weight of 6,000 pounds negates this. Performance can be described as ho-hum as it takes a few ticks longer to get up to speed. At least the eight-speed automatic transmission is a smooth operator and quick to respond when you stab the throttle.
  • The LX 570 is chock full of clever off-road tech such as crawl control, hill start assist, 360-degree camera system, and multi-terrain select system that optimizes various parts of the powertrain and four-wheel drive system. Sadly, we didn’t get the chance to put any of these to the test.
  • No matter the condition of the road, the LX 570 provides a smooth and relaxing ride. Impressive when you consider the LX is riding on a set of 21-inch wheels. Road and wind noise are kept to very acceptable levels.
  • Lexus added a set of adaptive dampers for the 2016 LX and you can adjust the firmness via a knob in the center console - Comfort, Sport, and Sport+. The dampers do help reduce body roll in corners, giving you a little bit more confidence. Steering is what you would expect in an SUV, light and numb. This makes the LX a bit cumbersome to move in certain places such as a parking lot.
  • Compared to the last LX 570 we drove, the 2016 model has gone up in price. Base price now stands at $88,880 and our as-tested price comes in at $96,905. This one feels a bit a more worth of price tag that Lexus is asking for, but I still think a Cadillac Escalade or Range Rover are slightly better in terms of value.
  • If you’re planning a trip to Death Valley or the Rocky Mountains and want something that can you there and back, along with providing all of the luxuries, look no further than the LX. Otherwise, there are a number of other luxury SUVs that make more sense if you’re planning to stay on the pavement.

Year: 2016
Make: Lexus
Model: LX 570
Trim: N/A
Engine: 5.7L 32-Valve, DOHC Dual VVT-i V8
Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Full-Time Four-Wheel Drive
Horsepower @ RPM: 383 @ 5,600
Torque @ RPM: 403 @ 3,600
Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/18/15
Curb Weight: 6,000 lbs
Location of Manufacture: Aichi, Japn
Base Price: $88,880
As Tested Price: $96,905 (Includes $940.00 Destination Charge)

Options:
Mark Levinson Audio System - $2,150.00
Dual-Screen DVD Rear-Seat Entertainment System - $2,005.00
Luxury Package - $1,190.00
Heads-Up Display - $900.00
Cargo Mat, Net, Wheel Locks, & Key Glove - $250.00
All-Weather Floor Mats - $165.00
Heated Black Shimamoku Steering Wheel - $150.00
Wireless Charger - $75.00


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This vehicles occupies a really strange, and if we're being honest- superfluous, spot in the market. With those 21's, and low overhangs, this is really only capable of light off-roading. And how many people are going to be even doing that in their near-100K SUV? Sure, it may be comfortable and have stellar reliability, but you can say the same thing about the substantially cheaper and infinitely better-looking Land Cruiser.

If this thing isn't at least bringing a better powerplant to the party than the Land Cruiser, I'd struggle to understand the reasons behind it's existence. In reality, there are no shortage of better options for both slightly more and even less than it's price point.

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I made a mistake in a post on another thread about Lexus never having made an engine with over 400 lb-ft of torque, because I forgot they still made this thing, and I didn't realize it has 403 lb-ft.  So this is the most torque heavy Lexus ever made.

Not sure why anyone would pay $76,000 for this let alone $96,000, I feel like this vehicle has been on sale over 10 years with no changes but the grille, it is the Crown Victoria of large SUVs.

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On 11/28/2016 at 10:01 AM, Frisky Dingo said:

This vehicles occupies a really strange, and if we're being honest- superfluous, spot in the market. With those 21's, and low overhangs, this is really only capable of light off-roading. And how many people are going to be even doing that in their near-100K SUV? Sure, it may be comfortable and have stellar reliability, but you can say the same thing about the substantially cheaper and infinitely better-looking Land Cruiser.

If this thing isn't at least bringing a better powerplant to the party than the Land Cruiser, I'd struggle to understand the reasons behind it's existence. In reality, there are no shortage of better options for both slightly more and even less than it's price point.

It will sell because of the L word...and not even the interesting L word.....

7 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

I made a mistake in a post on another thread about Lexus never having made an engine with over 400 lb-ft of torque, because I forgot they still made this thing, and I didn't realize it has 403 lb-ft.  So this is the most torque heavy Lexus ever made.

Not sure why anyone would pay $76,000 for this let alone $96,000, I feel like this vehicle has been on sale over 10 years with no changes but the grille, it is the Crown Victoria of large SUVs.

I think this comment is spot on, and I agreed with your comment in the other thread about Lexus being in some ways a second tier luxury brand next to Benz in terms of Toque and the S class.

The Crown Victoria was at least useful at what it did and not offensive in its appearance, two things that cannot be said about the Lexus in question.

On 11/28/2016 at 9:05 AM, William Maley said:

 

  • For 2016, Lexus has softened the LX’s boxy-shape with some rounded edges and more imposing fenders. The front grille has grown in size to match other Lexus vehicles, though to our eyes it looks more like the head from a Cylon in the 1980’s Battlestar Galactica tv show. The rear features new taillights and a reshaped tailgate.

 

 

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The science fiction reference is well placed, because the person who designed the tailgate obviously had an act of sexual congress with a Klingon in mind when he designed it.

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