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    • By William Maley
      Diesel is quite popular in Europe partly due to subsidies provided by governments - in this case, a lower tax rate on diesel fuel than gasoline. The thinking at the time was diesel engines burn their fuel more efficiently than gas engines, thus they contribute less to global warming. But as the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal would reveal, diesel vehicles aren't that much cleaner, producing more nitrogen oxide emissions than their gas counterparts. Now, one CEO from a German automaker is saying that maybe it is time to end the subsidies.
      “We should question the logic and purpose of diesel subsidies. The money can be invested more sensibly to promote more environmentally friendly technologies,” said Volkswagen CEO Matthias Müller to German paper Handelsblatt.
      This is quite the surprise as Volkswagen along with other German automakers said diesel still had a future due to new pollution reduction technologies. Also, Volkswagen did very well with the sales of diesel models. But with the dark cloud of the diesel emission scandal, Müller likely sees the writing on the wall and wants to get out ahead.
      Müller went on to say that he was in favor of banning older diesel vehicles from city centers. But he said that newer diesel vehicles should be exempt from the bans as they meet "stricter standards on nitrogen oxide emissions".
      Source: Handelsblatt via New York Times

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    • By William Maley
      Diesel is quite popular in Europe partly due to subsidies provided by governments - in this case, a lower tax rate on diesel fuel than gasoline. The thinking at the time was diesel engines burn their fuel more efficiently than gas engines, thus they contribute less to global warming. But as the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal would reveal, diesel vehicles aren't that much cleaner, producing more nitrogen oxide emissions than their gas counterparts. Now, one CEO from a German automaker is saying that maybe it is time to end the subsidies.
      “We should question the logic and purpose of diesel subsidies. The money can be invested more sensibly to promote more environmentally friendly technologies,” said Volkswagen CEO Matthias Müller to German paper Handelsblatt.
      This is quite the surprise as Volkswagen along with other German automakers said diesel still had a future due to new pollution reduction technologies. Also, Volkswagen did very well with the sales of diesel models. But with the dark cloud of the diesel emission scandal, Müller likely sees the writing on the wall and wants to get out ahead.
      Müller went on to say that he was in favor of banning older diesel vehicles from city centers. But he said that newer diesel vehicles should be exempt from the bans as they meet "stricter standards on nitrogen oxide emissions".
      Source: Handelsblatt via New York Times
    • By William Maley
      Despite announcing and getting ready to launch their SkyActivX compression ignition engines, along with an electric vehicle, Mazda will still be working on diesel engines for the coming future.
      “There is a benefit to keep developing the diesel engine. Because when we put the engine on a big vehicle, the big vehicle needs big torque as well and if you look at the diesel engine it can produce the large torque, so we still believe the diesel engine has advantages,” said Ichiro Hirose, Mazda's managing executive officer of powertrain and vehicle development to CarAdvice.
      “There is actually huge room for further improvement in diesel engines. [Such as] refining of the combustion, of course, the efficiency will be better, also emission will be reduced as well. As far as the diesel engine is concerned there are still many things we can do in terms of evenly mix the air-fuel and burn. Many things we can do.”
      A recent patent filed by Mazda shows a twin-turbo diesel engine that also features a supercharger, most likely to help minimize turbo lag.
      Source: CarAdvice
    • By William Maley
      Despite announcing and getting ready to launch their SkyActivX compression ignition engines, along with an electric vehicle, Mazda will still be working on diesel engines for the coming future.
      “There is a benefit to keep developing the diesel engine. Because when we put the engine on a big vehicle, the big vehicle needs big torque as well and if you look at the diesel engine it can produce the large torque, so we still believe the diesel engine has advantages,” said Ichiro Hirose, Mazda's managing executive officer of powertrain and vehicle development to CarAdvice.
      “There is actually huge room for further improvement in diesel engines. [Such as] refining of the combustion, of course, the efficiency will be better, also emission will be reduced as well. As far as the diesel engine is concerned there are still many things we can do in terms of evenly mix the air-fuel and burn. Many things we can do.”
      A recent patent filed by Mazda shows a twin-turbo diesel engine that also features a supercharger, most likely to help minimize turbo lag.
      Source: CarAdvice

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    • By William Maley
      Fiat Chrysler Automobile has quietly ended production of right-hand drive models from Chrysler and Dodge. According to South Africa's Wheels24, the announcement comes as FCA drops Chrysler and Dodge from their South Africa lineup.
      "FCA will say a fond farewell to two of the mainstay car brands, with the Chrysler and Dodge vehicle ranges no longer being available locally. This unfortunate situation has arisen from our principals in the USA no longer building Chrysler or Dodge vehicles in Right Hand Drive configuration," the company told Wheels24.
      According to Allpar, FCA built RHD variants of 300 and Charger in Brampton, Ontario, and Pacifica and Grand Caravan in Windsor, Ontario. It is unclear if this move will affect other markets where FCA sells RHD models such as Australia, New Zealand, and Indonesia. When reached for comment by Australia's CarAdvice, FCA Australia's manager of public relations Alessia Terranova said,
      “I am not at liberty to comment on South Africa’s decision. What I can tell you is that Australia will continue to sell the right-hand drive Chrysler 300 as an ongoing product in our lineup. In relation to Dodge, at this stage, this brand is represented as a parts and service operation only.”
      We'll keep you posted on this story.
      Source: Wheels24, Allpar, CarAdvice

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