Jump to content

Mazda News: Rumorpile: Mazda To Launch HCCI Engine For 2018 Mazda3


William Maley

Recommended Posts

Homogeneous charge compression ignition or HCCI engines are a unique prospect - use compression to ignite gasoline, like in a diesel vehicle. This allows for better fuel economy and lower emissions. A number of automakers have built prototypes and said they would be putting them into production down the road, but it has never happened. That may change in the near future.

The Nikkei Asian Review reports that Mazda will be launching an HCCI engine for the 2018 Mazda3 (Axela in Japan). This will be part of Mazda's second-generation of SkyActiv technologies to improve fuel economy. According to the report, the engine could give certain Mazda3 models a fuel economy figure of 30 kilometers per liter (about 71 mpg on the U.S. cycle). The report doesn't say if this is for city, highway, or combined.

Can Mazda do it or will it be like the others and not appear? We'll be watching to find out that answer.

Source: Nikkei Asian Review


View full article

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow!   Congrats on Mazda if they can make this work.  GM was working pretty hard on it pre-bankruptcy, but I guess development got tossed during that unpleasantness. 

Furthermore... this is what will doom diesel.  Diesel like fuel economy with gasoline engine power characteristics with gasoline level exhaust emissions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, William Maley said:

The diesel isn't out yet.

I am talking about the mess they had when they launched it in Europe and then pretty much had to stop everything to work on issues and with multiple missed dates of when it was coming to the US. I doubt it will really show up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really wanting them to be successful with this. If they have a wide range of being able to do this, awesome, if not, hopefully they have 8-10Speed auto's to make the best use of that range.

also, if it really is 70mpg.... i bet it would be on a "suburban" test. 30% better than what our "highway" figure is is ~52mpg.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A number of other outlets are reporting that this engine will not have spark plugs at all....... I highly highly doubt that to be the case. HCCI has such a narrow range of being able to run effectively that you would never want to run it as a standard automotive engine.  I could see running a "pure" HCCI engine as a regenerator for an EV where the gasoline engine is never connected to the wheels, but even then the cold starts would probably be pretty rough. 

Most likely, this engine will still have spark plugs. It will use the spark plugs during startup, idle, and heavy acceleration, and then switch to HCCI mode when cruising or accelerating under light throttle. This is where the huge efficiency gains will be. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does this type of engine produce as much torque as a diesel?  If not, I think diesel will still have a home in trucks and larger vehicles because that's where you really need the power.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Paolino said:

Does this type of engine produce as much torque as a diesel?  If not, I think diesel will still have a home in trucks and larger vehicles because that's where you really need the power.

No, it wouldn't have diesel like torque. It's also unlikely able to be turbo-charged, though I am not certain on this point. It might be possible to turbo an HCCI engine as long as the turbo and HCCI mode aren't running at the same time.

The driving characteristics of this would be just like any other Mazda 4-cylinder. When you get on the highway and are cruising at steady speed, the HCCI mode would come on and you'd get your great fuel economy then.  Under hard acceleration, it's just another 4-cylinder. 

As far as trucks, there's no reason they couldn't do an HCCI V6 or V8... cylinder count doesn't really matter.  But it would still be just a gasoline V6 or V8 with the same power you'd expect currently.... only you get much better fuel economy on the highway. 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

No, it wouldn't have diesel like torque. It's also unlikely able to be turbo-charged, though I am not certain on this point. It might be possible to turbo an HCCI engine as long as the turbo and HCCI mode aren't running at the same time.

The driving characteristics of this would be just like any other Mazda 4-cylinder. When you get on the highway and are cruising at steady speed, the HCCI mode would come on and you'd get your great fuel economy then.  Under hard acceleration, it's just another 4-cylinder. 

As far as trucks, there's no reason they couldn't do an HCCI V6 or V8... cylinder count doesn't really matter.  But it would still be just a gasoline V6 or V8 with the same power you'd expect currently.... only you get much better fuel economy on the highway. 

What is your reasoning for saying a turbocharged HCCI engine may not be feasible? Turbo diesel engines use compression ignition. Is the difference in pressure the problem?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, cp-the-nerd said:

What is your reasoning for saying a turbocharged HCCI engine may not be feasible? Turbo diesel engines use compression ignition. Is the difference in pressure the problem?

I can't say that I'm knowledgeable enough to be sure. However, the way diesel and HCCI burn fuel are different, so just because diesel can do it doesn't mean HCCI can. The video I posted above has a section that explains the different flame fronts and why HCCI is different in that regard.

The thing is, it is unlikely that any HCCI engine would be in HCCI mode all the time. So the engine could still be turbocharged and just only use HCCI when there is no boost going on.

*IF* Mazda engineers figured out a way to make HCCI work while the turbo was providing boost, that would be possibly the biggest engine development achievement of the last 60 years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought there isn't a reason why diesels couldn't have HCCI "mode"....?

if a turbo could be used in HCCI.. couldn't it just be used as a preheating of the charge?  could a variable "displacement" intercooler be possible, thus able to modify approximate temps based on boost?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Social Stream

  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Mazda and the Rotary Engine has been a "will they or will they not" since production of the RX-8 ended many moons ago. Recently, the Japanese automaker announced the engine would make a return as a range extender for the new MX-30 electric crossover. Those plans have been put on the back burner.
      "We are still considering using the rotary engine as a range extender, but the timing of its introduction is undecided," said Mazda spokesperson Masahiro Sakata to Automotive News.
      But the Japanese media tells a different story. AN says Japanese newspapers Nikkei and Nikkan Jidosha Shimbun report the rotary engine plans have been canned because it would require a larger battery, which in turn, increases the price. However, another Japanese outlet, Response says those reports are mistaken.
      Currently, the MX-30 is on sale in Japan and Europe as an electric only. Mazda will be offering the MX-30 for California later this fall. 
      Many reviewers in Europe say the biggest weak point of the MX-30 is the range - currently rated at 124 miles on the very optimistic WLTP test cycle. Numbers for the U.S. aren't out, but we wouldn't be surprised if its under 100 miles. Using the rotary engine as a generator (see Chevrolet Volt) would have increased the range.
      We do know Mazda has 10 hybrids and three electric vehicles in the pipeline between 2022 to 2025. Whether or not they will be using a rotary engine is unclear.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Autoblog

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Mazda and the Rotary Engine has been a "will they or will they not" since production of the RX-8 ended many moons ago. Recently, the Japanese automaker announced the engine would make a return as a range extender for the new MX-30 electric crossover. Those plans have been put on the back burner.
      "We are still considering using the rotary engine as a range extender, but the timing of its introduction is undecided," said Mazda spokesperson Masahiro Sakata to Automotive News.
      But the Japanese media tells a different story. AN says Japanese newspapers Nikkei and Nikkan Jidosha Shimbun report the rotary engine plans have been canned because it would require a larger battery, which in turn, increases the price. However, another Japanese outlet, Response says those reports are mistaken.
      Currently, the MX-30 is on sale in Japan and Europe as an electric only. Mazda will be offering the MX-30 for California later this fall. 
      Many reviewers in Europe say the biggest weak point of the MX-30 is the range - currently rated at 124 miles on the very optimistic WLTP test cycle. Numbers for the U.S. aren't out, but we wouldn't be surprised if its under 100 miles. Using the rotary engine as a generator (see Chevrolet Volt) would have increased the range.
      We do know Mazda has 10 hybrids and three electric vehicles in the pipeline between 2022 to 2025. Whether or not they will be using a rotary engine is unclear.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), Autoblog
    • By William Maley
      There are some cars I will not turn down the opportunity to spend time with again. A prime example is the Mazda MX-5 Miata, a car that brings a smile to my face. This past fall, I had a chance to spend some time in a soft-top version and to figure out whether I would have this or the RF.
      What has changed since our last visit with Miata? Only a few things such as the addition of Mazda's i-Activsense suite of active safety features (automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring, and lane-departure warning) as standard; and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for the Club and Grand Touring models. I find myself drawn more to the standard Miata than RF because it looks a bit neater. The hardtop makes the Miata look somewhat bulky.  The 17-inch wheels finished in dark silver help set the car off. The addition of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto makes using the MazdaConnect infotainment system a bit more bearable to use. I found myself using CarPlay more due to its easier interface layout and brighter graphics. Power comes from a 2.0L Skyactiv-G inline-four with 181 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed manual, while an automatic is optional. As I noted in my review of the RF, the new 2.0 makes a dramatic difference to the Miata's performance. Leaving a stop, the engine freely revs and delivers a smooth rush of power. I think this version is slightly faster than the RF, mostly due to it not having the foldable hardtop. The six-speed manual is still one of the sweetest transmissions I have used. It feels smooth and precise when running through the gears. Handling is still one of the Miata's strong points as it eagerly changes direction and shows little body roll. Steering is sharp and provides the right amount of weight when driven hard. Ride quality is slightly better than the RF I drove last year due to the Grand Touring not having as stiff as a suspension setup. Yes, you will still feel several bumps and imperfections. But not at the rate as you'll experience in the Club. The Miata is one of those few cars I find myself still being impressed with every time I get the chance to drive one. It offers a level of driving fun that very few models can match, along with a price tag that won’t break the bank. If you were to ask which Miata I would choose, it would be the soft top. Disclaimer: Mazda Provided the MX-5 Miata, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Mazda
      Model: MX-5 Miata
      Trim: Grand Touring
      Engine: 2.0L Skyactiv-G DOHC Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Manual, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 181 @ 7,000
      Torque @ RPM: 151 @ 4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/34/29
      Curb Weight: 2,341 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
      Base Price: $31,670
      As Tested Price: $32,790 (Includes $920.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Grey Cloth Roof - $200.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      There are some cars I will not turn down the opportunity to spend time with again. A prime example is the Mazda MX-5 Miata, a car that brings a smile to my face. This past fall, I had a chance to spend some time in a soft-top version and to figure out whether I would have this or the RF.
      What has changed since our last visit with Miata? Only a few things such as the addition of Mazda's i-Activsense suite of active safety features (automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring, and lane-departure warning) as standard; and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for the Club and Grand Touring models. I find myself drawn more to the standard Miata than RF because it looks a bit neater. The hardtop makes the Miata look somewhat bulky.  The 17-inch wheels finished in dark silver help set the car off. The addition of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto makes using the MazdaConnect infotainment system a bit more bearable to use. I found myself using CarPlay more due to its easier interface layout and brighter graphics. Power comes from a 2.0L Skyactiv-G inline-four with 181 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed manual, while an automatic is optional. As I noted in my review of the RF, the new 2.0 makes a dramatic difference to the Miata's performance. Leaving a stop, the engine freely revs and delivers a smooth rush of power. I think this version is slightly faster than the RF, mostly due to it not having the foldable hardtop. The six-speed manual is still one of the sweetest transmissions I have used. It feels smooth and precise when running through the gears. Handling is still one of the Miata's strong points as it eagerly changes direction and shows little body roll. Steering is sharp and provides the right amount of weight when driven hard. Ride quality is slightly better than the RF I drove last year due to the Grand Touring not having as stiff as a suspension setup. Yes, you will still feel several bumps and imperfections. But not at the rate as you'll experience in the Club. The Miata is one of those few cars I find myself still being impressed with every time I get the chance to drive one. It offers a level of driving fun that very few models can match, along with a price tag that won’t break the bank. If you were to ask which Miata I would choose, it would be the soft top. Disclaimer: Mazda Provided the MX-5 Miata, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Mazda
      Model: MX-5 Miata
      Trim: Grand Touring
      Engine: 2.0L Skyactiv-G DOHC Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Six-Speed Manual, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 181 @ 7,000
      Torque @ RPM: 151 @ 4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/34/29
      Curb Weight: 2,341 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
      Base Price: $31,670
      As Tested Price: $32,790 (Includes $920.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Grey Cloth Roof - $200.00
    • By William Maley
      The COVID-19 pandemic has possibly caused another auto show to rethink their plans. According to Automotive News, organizers of the show are planning to delay the show from November to next May. Three sources tell the outlet the new dates are May 21st to 31st. Two of sources go on to say that an announcement could come this week.
      Automotive News tried to get comment from Terri Toennies, president of the show, but did not reply.
      By possibly moving the LA Auto Show to May, automakers and organizers of the New York and Detroit shows find themselves in a difficult spot. The LA show sandwiches between New York (April) and the revised Detroit show (June), which may cause automakers to make difficult decisions as to which shows get the most significant unveilings or whether to attend at all.
      Auto shows in general have been struggling before the onset of the pandemic. With automakers deciding to hold their own events to have more time in the spotlight and save cash, the spectacle of the show has gone down.
      We'll keep you posted.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
  • Reader Rides

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×
×
  • Create New...