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William Maley

BMW News: BMW To Begin Production of 2017 Diesel Vehicles

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BMW has been in a holding pattern in terms of producing diesel vehicles for the U.S. as they were awaiting approval from the EPA retesting diesel vehicles. Soon, 2017 model year diesel vehicles will be rolling off BMW's assembly lines and heading off to the U.S.

"Diesel models will be going into production shortly at our manufacturing plants," said Rebecca K. Kiehne, product & technology spokesperson at BMW of North America to Green Car Reports.

As we reported back in October, the EPA was holding back the certifications on a number of diesel vehicles as they subjecting them to new tests to uncover possible cheating - thanks Volkswagen. In our report, BMW said they would not start production of the 3-Series and X3 diesel models until the end of the year. Production of the X5 diesel would begin in January. 

The production restart of BMW's diesels comes at an interesting time. The EPA is currently investigating the 3.0L EcoDiesel used in the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 for possible violations of the clean air act. Over at Volkswagen, the board has given the ok for the $4.3 billion settlement with the Department of Justice over the diesel emission scandal. 

Source: Green Car Reports


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I think all auto companies are rethinking their Diesel strategy and I believe this could be the last go around by those that do get their EPA certification.

Was looking at Def and shocked that MB on their Diesels charge $317 to refill the DEF tank which is needed to be filled twice a year based on 12,000 miles driven. Costs are much higher than they used to be for driving Diesel and I do not see the MPG off setting that cost much. I think Hybrid and EV's will clearly replace the so called benefit of having a Diesel car or SUV.

I really only see value in having a Diesel in the trucks or FULL SIze SUV's like a suburban. The torque could be well used there. Course EV's once Batteries get better will replace that too.

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