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William Maley

Dodge News: Dodge Makes the Challenger Hellcat Even Wider

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32 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

If I wanted a car that looked as bad as the Juke I would buy a Benz....

Saw a Benz convertible over lunch....change the badge and you could sell the damn thing as a Sebring.

So True :metal: This is just a MB with a Chrysler logo on it.

2007-chrysler-sebring-photo-113734-s-1280x782.jpg

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3 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

Agreed but the problem may be having an AWD system that can handle 707HP. 

Well, they ARE making an AWD GC Hellcat, so......

 

Aside from that, even if they detuned it a bit and did a few other unique-to-it special touches, it would have been a lot cooler.

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2 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

 

I like where your head's at, but an R8 is a little out of my price range at the moment, lol. Maybe an RS5. Of course, the only way it'd beat the more track savvy pony cars is in inclement weather. :lol:

Heck if your going to pay the type of coin for an RS5, why not just buy an old auto you love and put in the powertrain you really want and have an cheaper auto to insure with modern peformance powertrain from the automakers performance department. If the company does not make it, GM Performance can provide a great plug and play solution.

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Just now, dfelt said:

So True :metal: This is just a MB with a Chrysler logo on it.

2007-chrysler-sebring-photo-113734-s-1280x782.jpg

I was driving around with my mom- who is 53- the other day, and she pointed out a new C Class we were coming up on at a red light. She asked me what it was, and when I told her said, "It looks like a Hyundai."

 

I submit as evidence-

USC60MBC891A021001.jpg0371343_cd5715302651079688301_v1sm.jpg?v2016-mercedes-benz-c350e-plug-in-hybrid-

a27fdefa3363b510_e685748343e9ba.jpg

  • Haha 2

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39 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

If I wanted a car that looked as bad as the Juke I would buy a Benz....

Saw a Benz convertible over lunch....change the badge and you could sell the damn thing as a Sebring.

It is amazing to see how many people swap out their Benz motors for a reliable LS engine.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Mercedes+LS+Engine+Swap&FORM=IDMHDL

MercedesLS1.jpg

LS-SwapMB.jpg

LS-MB-Swap.jpg

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9 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Heck if your going to pay the type of coin for an RS5, why not just buy an old auto you love and put in the powertrain you really want and have an cheaper auto to insure with modern peformance powertrain from the automakers performance department. If the company does not make it, GM Performance can provide a great plug and play solution.

 

Well, I love the RS5. It's like the a 911 C4 and GT350 had a baby. Stunning looks, tenacious AWD grip, impeccable refinement and build quality, and fantastic sonorous N/A V8.

 

That said, I probably wouldn't actually buy one. For the money, I'd buy a new S4 or RS3. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's to the point I don't think I would ever swap an LS into a non-GM vehicle. I understand why people do it, and it's a great engine, but it has just been done to death at this point.

Edited by Frisky Dingo
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52 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

Well, they ARE making an AWD GC Hellcat, so......

 

Aside from that, even if they detuned it a bit and did a few other unique-to-it special touches, it would have been a lot cooler.

Very much so!

43 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

 

Well, I love the RS5. It's like the a 911 C4 and GT350 had a baby. Stunning looks, tenacious AWD grip, impeccable refinement and build quality, and fantastic sonorous N/A V8.

 

That said, I probably wouldn't actually buy one. For the money, I'd buy a new S4 or RS3. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's to the point I don't think I would ever swap an LS into a non-GM vehicle. I understand why people do it, and it's a great engine, but it has just been done to death at this point.

I could see swapping a vintage nailhead Buick into a 32 Ford Chassis if one wanted to build an era correct replica of a 50's custom roadster...that would be a justifiable GM swap into a non GM vehicle.

45 minutes ago, dfelt said:

It is amazing to see how many people swap out their Benz motors for a reliable LS engine.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Mercedes+LS+Engine+Swap&FORM=IDMHDL

MercedesLS1.jpg

LS-SwapMB.jpg

LS-MB-Swap.jpg

Like the older Benz, but on the upper two, it is lipstick on a pig...

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2 hours ago, Frisky Dingo said:

Well, they ARE making an AWD GC Hellcat, so......

 

Aside from that, even if they detuned it a bit and did a few other unique-to-it special touches, it would have been a lot cooler.

Different architecture though with the GC so that could be part of the reason for the omission of it from the Challenger. 

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11 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

Different architecture though with the GC so that could be part of the reason for the omission of it from the Challenger. 

Or internal accounting and cost justification.  The engineering budget got spent on a trunk latch for an Alfa in Italy...

Would still love to see it in production...

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Just now, A Horse With No Name said:

Or internal accounting and cost justification.  The engineering budget got spent on a trunk latch for an Alfa in Italy...

Would still love to see it in production...

IIRC, they did offer AWD with a V8 in the Charger and 300C, so the engineering work should be long ago done...

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52 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

IIRC, they did offer AWD with a V8 in the Charger and 300C, so the engineering work should be long ago done...

But the Hellcat is putting down a lot more power than those were back then. 

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16 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

But the Hellcat is putting down a lot more power than those were back then. 

True, would likely have to beef up various parts, etc....I've never looked at the AWD setup on an LX..not sure what the transfer case, etc looks like compared to GCs which I'm familiar with..  I would assume on a car the components are smaller/lighter duty, don't have the space or ground clearance you have with an SUV or truck..

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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2 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

True, would likely have to beef up various parts, etc....I've never looked at the AWD setup on an LX..not sure what the transfer case, etc looks like compared to GCs which I'm familiar with..

The GC is a more up to date is all I know. I think they could do AWD but as others have pointed out, cost may prohibit that from being a reality. 

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On 6/29/2017 at 0:29 PM, A Horse With No Name said:

Throw pitchforks but the Mustang has the best interior by far....not even remotely close.

I like all three...and test drove an eco Boost Mustang before my most recent car purchase...but I am kind of burned out by the whole pony car thing.

Hate to say it but I might buy a Nismo 370 before I would buy a Challenger...

Both interiors are great, but the Challenger just seems more high class (talking the 15+ interior only BTW).

 

I am really intrigued by the new RS5 with it's 450 HP TT 2.9 V6 and updated AWD system.  And the R8, OMG, just getting to sit in a 1st gen, I loved that car.  So thoughtful, tons of interior room for my 6 foot tall self, just an amazing supercar made for everyday. 

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Im iffy on the visuals of the widebody.

Sometimes I like the look of it, sometimes I dont.

I dont like it most of the time because in pictures, the fender flares looked tacked on, like a bad home garage hot rodding project gone to hell!

Without the rivet holes on the factory car of course!

12725000_901635539949654_1691128765_n.jp

 

Id prefer something like this instead

Wide_Body_Dodge_Challenger_on_Asanti_Whe

lt6c9522-2.jpg

1360949412_lt6c9534-2.jpg

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I can still think of a ton of cars I would much rather own.

Including a GT 350 R.

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Ill just defend the Chally's honour.

I must say, there is a lot of sour grapes and falsehoods in this thread regarding the Challenger.

One HUUUUGE falsehood is that the the Challenger is as claustrophobic as a Mustang and  a bunker like a Camaro where you cant see out of it!!!

This is bullshyte of course!!!

The sour grape approach is that some are afraid to admit that the Challenger actually is a well demeanored vehicle that CAN handle the twisties just fine with all that horsepower under the hood.

Question is....should the Challenger BE a fully capable twisty sports car?

THE ANSWER IS A PHOQUING RESOUNDING NO!!!!

IT IS A PURE PHOQUING MUSCLE CAR IN THE PUREST PHOQUING SENSE.

I for one DONT want this pony car to become more in line with a Mustang or Camaro and become more European. Its just phoquing fine just the way it phoquing is!

And the way it sells in the market place, which is not far behind the other two, plenty of people agree with  me! Especially considering how archaic the platform is and how new and state of the art the other two are!

I agree with @Frisky Dingo

AWD would really blow the universe apart!

DQZjw_s-200x150.gif

 

Edited by oldshurst442
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    • By William Maley
      It has been a year since I first drove the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid and came away very impressed. For a seven-passenger vehicle, getting 33 miles on electric power only and an average fuel economy of over 30 mpg was quite the shock. Would I still feel that way a year on?
      Chrysler made some minor changes for 2018 Pacifica Hybrid, including revamping the trim lineup and adding more standard features. In the case of our Limited tester, it gains a 20-speaker Harman Kardon sound system as standard. Can I just say how good the Pacifica Hybrid looks in this rich blue. The color helps Pacifica’s shape pop out wherever it is parked. No changes concerning the interior of the Pacifica Hybrid. That’s a good thing as the model is towards the top of the minivan hierarchy with a handsome design, impressive materials, and comfortable seating in all of the rows. One downside to going with the Pacifica Hybrid is the loss of the Stow n’ Go seats for the second-row. That space is taken up by the massive battery pack. An 8.4-inch touchscreen with UConnect is standard on all Pacifica Hybrids. This version of UConnect has a special section that provides key information on the hybrid system, including a power output screen and a place to set up the timeframe for when you want the van to charge up. The hybrid powertrain is comprised a 3.6L V6 running on the Atkinson cycle; two electric motors, and a 16-kW lithium-ion battery pack Total output is rated at 260 horsepower. Despite the added heft of the hybrid system, the Pacifica Hybrid is no slouch. The two electric motors provide instantaneous torque to help move the van at a surprising rate. The V6 will come on when more power is needed such as driving on the highway. One nice touch I like is how seamless the transition between electric and hybrid power is. The only sign aside from having the status screen up is the V6 turning on and off. One item I wish Chrysler would reconsider is offering the driver the ability to change between electric hybrid models that other plug-in hybrid offer. I understand why Chrysler decided not to do this as it might not be used by most drivers. But for a small group, including myself, it would nice to choose when the electric powertrain was in use to help conserve range. EPA says the 2018 Pacifica Hybrid will return 84 MPGe on electric power and 32 MPG when running on hybrid power. Overall electric range is rated at 33 miles. My averages for the week mirrored what I saw in the 2017 model - about 32 miles on electric range and an average fuel economy figure of 32. Having the Pacifica Hybrid for a week reminded me of one of the key issues that will face many, charging times. On a 120V outlet, it takes 16 hours for the battery to fully recharge. If you have a 240V charger, that drops to a reasonable 2 hours.  Handling is possibly one of the biggest surprises in the Pacifica Hybrid. The added heft of hybrid system allows the Pacifica to feel poised in the corners and have minimal body roll. Ride quality is the same as the standard Pacifica - almost all bumps are smoothed over. Road and wind noise are kept to almost silent levels. Pricing for the Pacifica Hybrid begins at $39,995 for the base Touring Plus and climbs to $44,995 for the Limited. My tester came to $49,825 with a few options, including the Advanced SafetyTec group that adds adaptive cruise control, surround view camera system, and blind spot monitoring. Sadly, this package isn’t available on lower trims.  There is the $7,500 federal tax credit and various state incentives that will be swayed around to draw some people in, but be forewarned those only come into effect when it is time to do taxes, not when you purchase the vehicle. Disclaimer: Chrysler Provided the Pacifica, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Gallery: Quick Drive: 2018 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid Limited
      Year: 2018
      Make: Chrysler
      Model: Pacifica Hybrid
      Trim: Limited
      Engine: 3.6L V6 eHybrid System
      Driveline: eFlite EVT,  Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 260 @ N/A (Combined)
      Torque @ RPM: N/A
      Fuel Economy: Gas + Electric Combined, Gas Combined - 84 MPGe, 32 MPG
      Curb Weight: 4,987 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Windsor, Ontario
      Base Price: $44,995
      As Tested Price: $49,825 (Includes $1,345 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Tri-Pane Panoramic Sunroof - $1,595.00
      Advanced SafetyTec - $995.00
      18-inch x 7.5-inch Polished Aluminum wheels - $895.00
    • By William Maley
      It seems a bit odd to be driving the Giulia Ti almost half a year on from spending a week high-performance Quadrifoglio. This felt like I had a nice slice of cake and was now facing a bowl of vegetables. Trying to keep an open mind on Ti was going to be difficult, considering the mixed opinions I had with the first Giulia. But I knew that I had to try.
      I actually prefer the toned-down nature of Ti Sport compared to Quadrifoglio as lacks the aggressive bumper treatment and cloverleaf emblems on the fenders. Some items such as the uniquely styled wheels do carry over and add a small sporting touch. The only item I would change is the color. Grey just makes the design somewhat boring. The blue I had on the Quadrifoglio works much better as it allows the design to stand out. The interior is still very much a mixed affair. Most of the materials are what you would expect to find a luxury car of this caliber with soft-touch plastics, leather, and metal trim. But Alfa clearly cut some corners such as the cheap plastics used on the center console. The front sport seats provide excellent bolstering and comfort for any adventure you decide to take. Rear space is almost non-existent for most adults. Alfa Romeo did address one of my complaints with that I had with 2017 Giulia. 2018 models now have the option of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It is shame that it is an option, but it does make using infotainment system somewhat less frustrating. Some of the issues I had with the system in both the Giulia Quadrifoglio and Stelvio Ti are present in this Giulia. Going through a number of menus to accomplish simple tasks, slow performance, and a small number of crashes during my weeklong test. I really hope Alfa Romeo is working on some updates to get this system in order. Power comes from a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder delivering 280 horsepower and 306 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and optional Q4 all-wheel drive. I really liked this engine in the Stevlio as moved the compact crossover without breaking a sweat. In the Giulia, this engine makes this sedan fly away from stops. It is said the turbo-four can hit 60 mph in just over five seconds, which is fast for the class. One disappointment is the engine sounding like a diesel at idle, not something you want to have in an Italian sport sedan. EPA says the Giulia Ti with AWD will return 23 City/31 Highway/26 Combined. My average for the week landed around 23.6 in mostly city driving. One trait that both the Ti Sport and Quadrifoglio share is the handling. The chassis underneath allows the Giulia to dart around in the corners and keep body motions well in check. Steering is another bright spot where the vehicle would instantly respond to any input, along with provide good feedback. Ride quality is slightly better than the Quadrifoglio as only a small number of bumps come inside. Put the Giulia into Dynamic (sport mode) and the ride does become somewhat unbearable. Unfortunately, my Giulia Ti tester had an issue with the brakes. Whenever the brakes were applied, there was a noticeable screeching noise coming the rear of the vehicle. At first, I thought something had gotten lodged in the brakes. But the noise would go away after I had been driving for a bit. Park the car for awhile and drive it once again, the noise would return. This likely hints at something being warped - a bit disappointing for a vehicle that only had a few thousand miles on the odometer. The Giulia is one of those vehicles I really want to like a lot more than I currently do. Alfa Romeo still has a number of issues they need to address sooner than later. I only would recommend this model for those who understand what they’re getting into. Gallery: 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti Sport Q4
      Disclaimer: Alfa Romeo Provided the Giulia, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Alfa Romeo
      Model: Giulia
      Trim: Ti Sport Q4
      Engine: 2.0L Turbocharged MultiAir SOHC Inline-Four
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 280 @ 5,200
      Torque @ RPM: 306 @ 2,000 - 4,800
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 23/31/26
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Cassino, Italy
      Base Price: $41,995
      As Tested Price: $51,885 (Includes $1,295 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Ti Sport AWD Package 22S - $2,500.00
      Driver Assist Dynamic Plus Package - $1,500.00
      Ti Leather Package - $995.00
      8.8-inch AM/FM Bluetooth Radio with 3D Nav - $950.00
      Harman/Kardon Premium Audio System - $900.00
      Driver Assistance Static Package - $650.00
      Vesuvio Gray Metallic - $600.00
      19-inch x 8-inch Bright 5-Hole Aluminum Wheels - $500.00

      View full article
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