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William Maley

Dodge News: Dodge Makes the Challenger Hellcat Even Wider

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Another day and another Challenger variant has been revealed. This time it is the 2018 Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody.

The Widebody features the wide front fenders and splitter found on the Demon. The new fenders add 3.5-inches in overall width - perfect to fit the 305/35R20-size Pirelli P Zero tires with a set of 20-inch wheels. Dodge claims the changes make the Widebody faster around a track than a standard Hellcat - about 2 seconds on a 1.7-mile road course according to testing done by Dodge. (We'll be waiting for a magazine to do a test to see how much of a difference there is. -WM).

Dodge also says the Hellcat Widebody will be quicker to 60 mph and quarter-mile (0.1 and 0.3 seconds respectively). 

The Hellcat Widebody also features a new electrically assisted power-steering system. This allows for new various steering modes to be selected from the SRT driving mode system.

Price? The Hellcat Widebody begins at $72,590 (after $1,700 for the gas guzzler tax and $1,095 destination). It goes on sale in the third quarter.

Source: Dodge 
Press Release is on Page 2


New Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody Completes Dodge’s Most Powerful Muscle Car Lineup Ever for 2018

  • New SRT Hellcat Widebody model has a starting U.S. Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price of $71,495 (including $1,700 gas guzzler tax, excluding $1,095 destination).
  • Widebody design brings new fender flares first seen on 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon to the Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody, adding 3.5 inches of width
  • New 20 x 11-inch “Devil’s Rim” split-five spoke aluminum wheels riding on 305/35ZR20 Pirelli P-Zero performance tires answer enthusiasts who have been clamoring for a factory-production Hellcat with even more grip
  • Road course lap time on a 1.7-mile track lowered by approximately 2 seconds per lap in Widebody vs. standard Hellcat, approximately 13 car lengths after one lap
  • New standard electric power steering (EPS) system with SRT Drive Modes add new selectable steering tuning to Hellcat, to help manage increased grip for improved acceleration and handling performance 
  • Powered by proven 707-horsepower supercharged 6.2-liter HEMI® Hellcat V-8 engine
  • 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody model is open for dealer orders in July; will start arriving in dealerships in the third quarter

June 27, 2017 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - When the new 840-horsepower Dodge Challenger SRT Demon raced down the drag strip to open the New York Auto Show in April, Dodge unleashed the ultimate street-to-strip car. Today, the brand is following up on its performance car mantra, introducing the new 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody, answering enthusiasts who have been clamoring for a factory-production Hellcat with even more grip.   
 
“The new Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody completes our strongest Dodge muscle car lineup in history,” said Tim Kuniskis, Head of Passenger Cars – Dodge, SRT, Chrysler and FIAT – FCA North America. “Our brand, engineering and design teams poured a ton of effort into making the new SRT Demon the world’s fastest quarter-mile production car, so now we’re leveraging that know-how, and some of those vital elements and transferring them to the new Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody for improved performance on the street and a bolder, more aggressive new look.”
 
With a starting U.S. Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $71,495 (including gas guzzler tax, excluding destination $1,095), the new Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody model features the same fender flares first shown on the SRT Demon. These wider fender flares add 3.5 inches to the SRT Hellcat’s overall width, covering the new 20 x 11-inch “Devil’s Rim” split-five spoke aluminum wheels, which ride on new, wider 305/35ZR20 Pirelli P-Zero tires with a new tread pattern. A new electric power steering (EPS) system with SRT Drive Modes adds new selectable steering tuning for the first time on a Hellcat model.
 
In addition to its wider, more menacing stance, this new Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody delivers improved lap times, lateral grip, acceleration and braking, compared with the already ferocious performance numbers of the Hellcat:

  • Road course lap time on a 1.7-mile track lowered by approximately 2 seconds per lap, approximately 13 car lengths after one lap
  • ¼ mile elapsed time (ET) improved by approximately .3 sec (10.9 ET in Widebody vs. 11.2 ET in standard Hellcat)
  • Lateral skid pad grip increased by .04 g (.97 g in Widebody vs. .93 g in standard Hellcat)
  • 0-60 mph acceleration improved by .1 second (3.4 in Widebody vs. 3.5 in standard Hellcat)
  • Top speed of 195 mph

 
New EPS – a First for Hellcat  
The 2018 Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody features a new standard electric power steering (EPS) system – a first for Hellcat. The system uses SRT Drive Modes with selectable settings for Street (Auto), Sport and Track.
 
Not only does the EPS system improve handling performance, owners will also notice better steering feel and ease of turning efforts at parking lot speeds. 
 
With EPS and SRT Drive Modes, drivers can tailor their experience by controlling horsepower, transmission shift speeds, steering, paddle shifters (automatic transmission only), traction and suspension. There is also a Custom setting lets the driver use individual preferences.
 
Functional and Intimidating Exterior Design
With the new Widebody fender flares that add 3.5 inches to the overall width of the Challenger Hellcat, the Widebody model joins the Challenger SRT Demon as the widest Challengers ever.
 
The new flares are expertly integrated into the body design with concealed attachments to amplify the Challenger SRT Hellcat’s menacing stance, while making room for the new 20 x 11-inch “Devil’s Rim” split-five spoke aluminum wheels that ride on 305/35ZR20 Pirelli tires for improved performance while filling the wheel wells for a stronger planted appearance. The front side marker lights are styled to flow with the shape of the fender flares.
 
The 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody carries numerous exterior styling cues Dodge//SRT owners expect, such as:

  • Power-bulge aluminum hood with center intake and dual heat extractors
  • Exclusive illuminated Air-Catcher headlamps that feed air directly into the air box and engine bay through the center of the parking lamps
  • Quad projector headlamps give a unique detailed appearance, while the aggressive brow “chops” the upper portion of the lamp design exudes a sinister look
  • Front splitter (shared with Demon) and rear spoiler (from Hellcat) deliver responsive and balanced handling at high speed
  • Hellcat-exclusive new grille and fender badges, along with raised SRT Hellcat badge on the rear spoiler
  • Standard Brembo brake system includes two-piece 15.4-inch rotors and six-piston front calipers provide outstanding heat management/thermal capacity and longevity

 
Proven Supercharged Hellcat Performance    
The 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody is powered by the 6.2-liter supercharged HEMI V-8 with 707 horsepower and 650 lb.-ft. torque and can be paired to either the Tremec six-speed manual or TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission. 
 
The proven Hellcat HEMI engine features additional cooling measures including a low-temperature circuit with two air/coolant heat exchangers integrated into the supercharger housing. This setup is designed to keep air temperatures below 140 degrees Fahrenheit, under extreme ambient conditions, while enabling air flow of up to 30,000 liters per minute.

So effective is this feature that engine power will not be de-rated due to cooling demands after 20 minutes of hard driving on a road course at an ambient temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
 
Before the new SRT Demon V-8 engine was introduced, the supercharged Hellcat HEMI V-8 was the most powerful passenger-car engine ever produced by FCA US, which made the Challenger SRT Hellcat and Charger SRT Hellcat models the most powerful and fastest coupe and sedan ever. The new engine was also named to Ward’s 10 Best Engines list for 2015.
 
Race-inspired, High-performance Interior
The cockpit of the Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody remains true to its performance-oriented design and execution with world-class materials; high-sill center console and driver-focused instrument panel with 200-mph speedometer; SRT performance leather-wrapped flat-bottom, heated steering wheel; standard SRT Laguna leather performance seats with SRT Hellcat logo, and new red Hellcat instrument panel badge.
 
SRT Performance Pages are accessible through the latest 8.4-inch touchscreen display media center with standard Uconnect 4C NAV system featuring performance improvements with faster startup time and enhanced processing power offering multi-touch gestures, vivid imagery, sharper graphics and the ability to support smartphone integrations.
 
The 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody will be available 15 exterior colors: B5 Blue (late availability), Billet Silver, Destroyer Grey, F8 Green (late availability), Go Mango, Granite Crystal, IndiGo Blue (late availability), Maximum Steel, Octane Red, Pitch Black, Plum Crazy (late availability), Redline Tri-Coat, TorRed, White Knuckle and Yellow Jacket.
 
Production of the 2018 Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody begins later this summer with deliveries to Dodge//SRT dealers in the third quarter.
 
Official Driving School of Dodge//SRT
All customers who buy the new 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody receive one full-day session at Bob Bondurant School of High-performance Driving. The Bob Bondurant School of High Performance Driving in Chandler, Arizona, is the Official High Performance Driving School of Dodge//SRT. All customers who buy a new model SRT will receive one full-day session of high-performance driving with professional instruction and time on the track as part of the Dodge SRT Package. For more information, visit www.driveSRT.com.


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Awesome...now just waiting for Sergio to give us some fresh products for those that want to drive on highways rather than race tracks...

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6 minutes ago, regfootball said:

Z1LE prob still beats this thing on the track bigly

Depends on the Track.

Camaro is part of a full line up, Challenger is part of a brand that hasn't had a full lineup of competent competitive vehicles since Nixon was president and Love American Style was a regular TV show.

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Would be nice if they could spread this passion around the rest of the line...

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2 hours ago, A Horse With No Name said:

Depends on the Track.

Camaro is part of a full line up, Challenger is part of a brand that hasn't had a full lineup of competent competitive vehicles since Nixon was president and Love American Style was a regular TV show.

Standard ZL1 would crush any Challenger on a track. It's not even a fair comparison, Dodge is doing pretty great things with a car on an ancient chassis, the Alpha Camaro is state of the art.

The 5th gen (2012-15) ZL1 will out track a standard Hellcat on 9/10 courses, the new ZL1 is so much more than a wide-body enhancement can accomplish, and the new 1LE is in a completely different league.

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6 hours ago, cp-the-nerd said:

Standard ZL1 would crush any Challenger on a track. It's not even a fair comparison, Dodge is doing pretty great things with a car on an ancient chassis, the Alpha Camaro is state of the art.

The 5th gen (2012-15) ZL1 will out track a standard Hellcat on 9/10 courses, the new ZL1 is so much more than a wide-body enhancement can accomplish, and the new 1LE is in a completely different league.

Interesting, thanks for the clarification!

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9 hours ago, cp-the-nerd said:

Standard ZL1 would crush any Challenger on a track. It's not even a fair comparison, Dodge is doing pretty great things with a car on an ancient chassis, the Alpha Camaro is state of the art.

The 5th gen (2012-15) ZL1 will out track a standard Hellcat on 9/10 courses, the new ZL1 is so much more than a wide-body enhancement can accomplish, and the new 1LE is in a completely different league.

Very true, Dodge is staying with the old 1970's thinking of the fastest straight line. Yet today, the bulk of drivers want a driving machine that goes fast, Hence the Camaro. 

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4 hours ago, dfelt said:

Very true, Dodge is staying with the old 1970's thinking of the fastest straight line. Yet today, the bulk of drivers want a driving machine that goes fast, Hence the Camaro. 

Not so much .  the released performance specs compared to the non widebody.  2 seconds quicker on a 1.7 mile track, 10.9 1/4 mile, .97G om the skidpad, new Epas steering system with multiple settings, 15.4 inch 6 piston breaks with 305mm wide tires all the way around should putt the puppy down pretty good.  i have been shocked about how different a 15+ Challenger and Charger compares to the older ones.  Even the base V6 feels like a totally different car and the interior is easily te best of the 3.  And the fact is 99% will get in a straightline tussle on the street while maybe 1% of either 1LE drivers or Hellcat drivers will ever tackle a road course.  For me?  it is the Hellcat.  You can see out of it, it has room aplenty, 5 seats, a big trunk, and looks menacing as hell.  The point is, get what your heart wants whatever it is. 

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48 minutes ago, Stew said:

Not so much .  the released performance specs compared to the non widebody.  2 seconds quicker on a 1.7 mile track, 10.9 1/4 mile, .97G om the skidpad, new Epas steering system with multiple settings, 15.4 inch 6 piston breaks with 305mm wide tires all the way around should putt the puppy down pretty good.  i have been shocked about how different a 15+ Challenger and Charger compares to the older ones.  Even the base V6 feels like a totally different car and the interior is easily te best of the 3.  And the fact is 99% will get in a straightline tussle on the street while maybe 1% of either 1LE drivers or Hellcat drivers will ever tackle a road course.  For me?  it is the Hellcat.  You can see out of it, it has room aplenty, 5 seats, a big trunk, and looks menacing as hell.  The point is, get what your heart wants whatever it is. 

I can respect what you are saying and totally agree get what you want. 

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I like the look of the wide body..I figured they wouldn't leave that only with the Demon.   Reminds me of JDM bosozoku style. 

The Camaro ZL-1 and 1LE are great performers on a track, no doubt...but the styling and cramped interior with tiny windows leaves me cold...love the Challenger styling, liked it since it first came out...

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13 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

I like the look of the wide body..I figured they wouldn't leave that only with the Demon.   Reminds me of JDM bosozoku style. 

The Camaro ZL-1 and 1LE are great performers on a track, no doubt...but the styling and cramped interior with tiny windows leaves me cold...love the Challenger styling, liked it since it first came out...

It pains me greatly to say this as the resident Ford critic, but I think GT 350 R would be my weapon of choice...

1 hour ago, Frisky Dingo said:

Cool. But they missed a huge opportunity by not making it AWD.

Agreed!

1 hour ago, Stew said:

Not so much .  the released performance specs compared to the non widebody.  2 seconds quicker on a 1.7 mile track, 10.9 1/4 mile, .97G om the skidpad, new Epas steering system with multiple settings, 15.4 inch 6 piston breaks with 305mm wide tires all the way around should putt the puppy down pretty good.  i have been shocked about how different a 15+ Challenger and Charger compares to the older ones.  Even the base V6 feels like a totally different car and the interior is easily te best of the 3.  And the fact is 99% will get in a straightline tussle on the street while maybe 1% of either 1LE drivers or Hellcat drivers will ever tackle a road course.  For me?  it is the Hellcat.  You can see out of it, it has room aplenty, 5 seats, a big trunk, and looks menacing as hell.  The point is, get what your heart wants whatever it is. 

See, if I get the Mustang, you get the Challenger, CP gets the Camaro, Frisky brings an Audi R8, Dfelt brings a Tesla 100, Cubical brings something cool and Ford oriented...a Boss 302 gently used...Dave87Rs brings a z28 Camaro...we can all be in budness....!

Edited by A Horse With No Name
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2 hours ago, A Horse With No Name said:

See, if I get the Mustang, you get the Challenger, CP gets the Camaro, Frisky brings an Audi R8, Dfelt brings a Tesla 100, Cubical brings something cool and Ford oriented...a Boss 302 gently used...Dave87Rs brings a z28 Camaro...we can all be in budness....!

Tesla 100 would be my 1994 Suburban EV converted that I am planning for. :metal: Plus I will be happy to bring some nice red wines to drink with chocolate! :P 

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19 hours ago, dfelt said:

I can respect what you are saying and totally agree get what you want. 

Very true.  i think they should do a widebody shaker, amp it up to 500HP even and call it the Shaker 500.  Black shaker on the hood with a black spoiler, the widebody kit and different style of 20 inch wheels, maybe with 5 solid spokes instead of split, maybe Crager SS style, but in black.   Starting with the Scat Pack based Shaker, this should be able to happen for the low 50s, maybe even 49995 lol  

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54 minutes ago, Stew said:

Very true.  i think they should do a widebody shaker, amp it up to 500HP even and call it the Shaker 500.  Black shaker on the hood with a black spoiler, the widebody kit and different style of 20 inch wheels, maybe with 5 solid spokes instead of split, maybe Crager SS style, but in black.   Starting with the Scat Pack based Shaker, this should be able to happen for the low 50s, maybe even 49995 lol  

Would be awesome...!

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21 hours ago, Stew said:

For me?  it is the Hellcat.  You can see out of it, it has room aplenty, 5 seats, a big trunk, and looks menacing as hell.  The point is, get what your heart wants whatever it is. 

The highlighted part is the only thing I find issue with. Nobody, I mean NOBODY, who complains about Camaro visibility is going to recommend you check out the Challenger instead. They are both bunkers with narrow windows and massive blind spots.

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1 hour ago, cp-the-nerd said:

The highlighted part is the only thing I find issue with. Nobody, I mean NOBODY, who complains about Camaro visibility is going to recommend you check out the Challenger instead. They are both bunkers with narrow windows and massive blind spots.

Been in them all.  The Challenger offers MASSIVELY better visibility than the 5th or 6th gen Camaro.  Plus, the Camaro interior is just awful compared to Challenger and mustang.  The dash is ugly and cheap while the Mustang and Challenger offer nicely styled interiors and better visibility. 

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24 minutes ago, Stew said:

Been in them all.  The Challenger offers MASSIVELY better visibility than the 5th or 6th gen Camaro.  Plus, the Camaro interior is just awful compared to Challenger and mustang.  The dash is ugly and cheap while the Mustang and Challenger offer nicely styled interiors and better visibility. 

Throw pitchforks but the Mustang has the best interior by far....not even remotely close.

I like all three...and test drove an eco Boost Mustang before my most recent car purchase...but I am kind of burned out by the whole pony car thing.

Hate to say it but I might buy a Nismo 370 before I would buy a Challenger...

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31 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

Throw pitchforks but the Mustang has the best interior by far....not even remotely close.

I like all three...and test drove an eco Boost Mustang before my most recent car purchase...but I am kind of burned out by the whole pony car thing.

Hate to say it but I might buy a Nismo 370 before I would buy a Challenger...

Did I hear you say a Mismo Juke? ;)

2017-nissan-juke-nismo-rs-black-red-details-original.jpg

O'h wait I read that wrong, a Nismo 370

370Nismo.jpg

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1 hour ago, dfelt said:

Did I hear you say a Mismo Juke? ;)

2017-nissan-juke-nismo-rs-black-red-details-original.jpg

O'h wait I read that wrong, a Nismo 370

370Nismo.jpg

If I wanted a car that looked as bad as the Juke I would buy a Benz....

Saw a Benz convertible over lunch....change the badge and you could sell the damn thing as a Sebring.

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On 6/28/2017 at 9:35 AM, Frisky Dingo said:

Cool. But they missed a huge opportunity by not making it AWD.

Agreed but the problem may be having an AWD system that can handle 707HP. 

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On 6/28/2017 at 1:07 PM, A Horse With No Name said:

It pains me greatly to say this as the resident Ford critic, but I think GT 350 R would be my weapon of choice...

Agreed!

See, if I get the Mustang, you get the Challenger, CP gets the Camaro, Frisky brings an Audi R8, Dfelt brings a Tesla 100, Cubical brings something cool and Ford oriented...a Boss 302 gently used...Dave87Rs brings a z28 Camaro...we can all be in budness....!

 

I like where your head's at, but an R8 is a little out of my price range at the moment, lol. Maybe an RS5. Of course, the only way it'd beat the more track savvy pony cars is in inclement weather. :lol:

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      Compared to the outgoing and expressive look of the exterior, the Stinger’s interior is quite disappointing. The minimalist approach Kia employs in the Stinger with minimal brightwork and narrow center stack doesn’t fully fit the exclusive image being presented outside. Not helping are some of the materials used in the Stinger. Considering that Kia is pitting this model against the likes of Audi and BMW, some of the plastics don’t match up to the image being portrayed. 
      The front seats in the Stinger GT offer excellent back support, along with numerous power adjustments including side bolstering. I did wish the bottom cushion was slightly longer to allow for better thigh support. Those sitting in the back will find adequate legroom, but headroom is tight due to the sloping roofline. It was a bit disappointing that Kia doesn’t offer seat heaters for the rear, considering some of their other models like the Optima offer it. One place that the Stinger excels at is cargo space. Open the rear hatch and you’ll find 23.3 cubic feet of space. This expands to 40.9 when the rear seats are folded. Only the Buick Regal Sportback and BMW 4-Series Gran Coupe offer more space.
      The Stinger GT uses an 8-inch touchscreen featuring Kia’s UVO infotainment system. We have heaped much praise on UVO on the system being simple to use and offering a number of features such as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. I don’t like the placement of touchscreen on top of the dash as it makes hard to reach. Kia should consider adding some sort of control knob on the center console to improve overall usability.
      GT models get a 3.3L twin-turbo V6 with 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic and rear-wheel drive. Our tester came with the optional all-wheel drive system. I have experienced this engine in Genesis G80 Sport and G90, and have raved about how it delivers ample power no matter the driving situation, along with minimal turbo lag. Those same traits continue in the Stinger GT as the engine moves the vehicle at a surprising rate. The eight-speed automatic transmission delivers rapid and smooth shifts.
      The big downside the twin-turbo V6 is fuel economy. EPA rates the Stinger GT at 19 City/25 Highway/21 Combined for both rear and all-wheel drive. My average for the week landed around 18.2 mpg partly due to me dipping a bit too much into the boost.
      Kia has been making a big deal about how the Stinger GT can rival competitors from other brands in terms of handling. They bring up how Albert Biermann, the former head at BMW’s M performance division, helped in the development of the chassis. Seems like a lot of talk, but the good news is that Kia has delivered. Down a winding road, the Stinger GT exhibits qualities seen on such vehicles like the Cadillac ATS and Lexus IS 350 F-Sport with excellent body control and a willingness to quickly transition from one corner to another. Steering is where Kia could do some more work as it doesn’t quite have the same feel or weight as those models mentioned above.
      Ride quality is another area where Stinger GT is surprising. Despite the 19-inch wheels and sporty suspension setup, the Stinger GT provides a compliant ride with only large bumps making their way inside. Road noise is noticeable, due mostly to the summer tire and wheel setup on the vehicle. Wind noise was kept to very acceptable levels.
      The Kia Stinger seems to be similar in the overall idea as the K900 in serving as an attainable halo vehicle. While the K900 aimed at those wanting something along the lines of an S-Class or 7-Series, the Stinger GT serves those who something that can rival the likes the BMW 3/4-Series, Audi A4/A5, and Mercedes-Benz C-Class not only in terms of performance, but also in luxury. The end result is mixed. Kia has nailed down the performance and exterior styling, but the interior doesn’t fully match the ambitions being presented. Fuel economy could be slightly better.
      But the biggest problem for the Stinger GT is convincing buyers to spend almost $50,000 on a Kia. My GT1 AWD tester with a few options came to an as-tested price of $48,350. Telling someone you spent that much for a Kia sedan will raise some eyebrows. Despite how good the Stinger GT is to look at or drive, the Kia badge on the front will ultimately push most people away. 
      If you’re part of a small group who could care less about what badge is fitted onto a vehicle, then you’ll find the Stinger GT is a very impressive package.
      Gallery: 2018 Kia Stinger GT1 AWD
      Disclaimer: Kia Provided the Stinger, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Kia
      Model: Stinger
      Trim: GT1 AWD
      Engine: 3.3L Twin-Turbo V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 365 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 376 @ 1,300-4,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/25/21
      Curb Weight: 4,023 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Sohari, South Korea
      Base Price: $45,450
      As Tested Price: $48,350 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Advanced Driver Assistance Package - $2,000

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      It has been a year since I first drove the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid and came away very impressed. For a seven-passenger vehicle, getting 33 miles on electric power only and an average fuel economy of over 30 mpg was quite the shock. Would I still feel that way a year on?
      Chrysler made some minor changes for 2018 Pacifica Hybrid, including revamping the trim lineup and adding more standard features. In the case of our Limited tester, it gains a 20-speaker Harman Kardon sound system as standard. Can I just say how good the Pacifica Hybrid looks in this rich blue. The color helps Pacifica’s shape pop out wherever it is parked. No changes concerning the interior of the Pacifica Hybrid. That’s a good thing as the model is towards the top of the minivan hierarchy with a handsome design, impressive materials, and comfortable seating in all of the rows. One downside to going with the Pacifica Hybrid is the loss of the Stow n’ Go seats for the second-row. That space is taken up by the massive battery pack. An 8.4-inch touchscreen with UConnect is standard on all Pacifica Hybrids. This version of UConnect has a special section that provides key information on the hybrid system, including a power output screen and a place to set up the timeframe for when you want the van to charge up. The hybrid powertrain is comprised a 3.6L V6 running on the Atkinson cycle; two electric motors, and a 16-kW lithium-ion battery pack Total output is rated at 260 horsepower. Despite the added heft of the hybrid system, the Pacifica Hybrid is no slouch. The two electric motors provide instantaneous torque to help move the van at a surprising rate. The V6 will come on when more power is needed such as driving on the highway. One nice touch I like is how seamless the transition between electric and hybrid power is. The only sign aside from having the status screen up is the V6 turning on and off. One item I wish Chrysler would reconsider is offering the driver the ability to change between electric hybrid models that other plug-in hybrid offer. I understand why Chrysler decided not to do this as it might not be used by most drivers. But for a small group, including myself, it would nice to choose when the electric powertrain was in use to help conserve range. EPA says the 2018 Pacifica Hybrid will return 84 MPGe on electric power and 32 MPG when running on hybrid power. Overall electric range is rated at 33 miles. My averages for the week mirrored what I saw in the 2017 model - about 32 miles on electric range and an average fuel economy figure of 32. Having the Pacifica Hybrid for a week reminded me of one of the key issues that will face many, charging times. On a 120V outlet, it takes 16 hours for the battery to fully recharge. If you have a 240V charger, that drops to a reasonable 2 hours.  Handling is possibly one of the biggest surprises in the Pacifica Hybrid. The added heft of hybrid system allows the Pacifica to feel poised in the corners and have minimal body roll. Ride quality is the same as the standard Pacifica - almost all bumps are smoothed over. Road and wind noise are kept to almost silent levels. Pricing for the Pacifica Hybrid begins at $39,995 for the base Touring Plus and climbs to $44,995 for the Limited. My tester came to $49,825 with a few options, including the Advanced SafetyTec group that adds adaptive cruise control, surround view camera system, and blind spot monitoring. Sadly, this package isn’t available on lower trims.  There is the $7,500 federal tax credit and various state incentives that will be swayed around to draw some people in, but be forewarned those only come into effect when it is time to do taxes, not when you purchase the vehicle. Disclaimer: Chrysler Provided the Pacifica, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Gallery: Quick Drive: 2018 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid Limited
      Year: 2018
      Make: Chrysler
      Model: Pacifica Hybrid
      Trim: Limited
      Engine: 3.6L V6 eHybrid System
      Driveline: eFlite EVT,  Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 260 @ N/A (Combined)
      Torque @ RPM: N/A
      Fuel Economy: Gas + Electric Combined, Gas Combined - 84 MPGe, 32 MPG
      Curb Weight: 4,987 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Windsor, Ontario
      Base Price: $44,995
      As Tested Price: $49,825 (Includes $1,345 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Tri-Pane Panoramic Sunroof - $1,595.00
      Advanced SafetyTec - $995.00
      18-inch x 7.5-inch Polished Aluminum wheels - $895.00
    • By William Maley
      It has been a year since I first drove the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid and came away very impressed. For a seven-passenger vehicle, getting 33 miles on electric power only and an average fuel economy of over 30 mpg was quite the shock. Would I still feel that way a year on?
      Chrysler made some minor changes for 2018 Pacifica Hybrid, including revamping the trim lineup and adding more standard features. In the case of our Limited tester, it gains a 20-speaker Harman Kardon sound system as standard. Can I just say how good the Pacifica Hybrid looks in this rich blue. The color helps Pacifica’s shape pop out wherever it is parked. No changes concerning the interior of the Pacifica Hybrid. That’s a good thing as the model is towards the top of the minivan hierarchy with a handsome design, impressive materials, and comfortable seating in all of the rows. One downside to going with the Pacifica Hybrid is the loss of the Stow n’ Go seats for the second-row. That space is taken up by the massive battery pack. An 8.4-inch touchscreen with UConnect is standard on all Pacifica Hybrids. This version of UConnect has a special section that provides key information on the hybrid system, including a power output screen and a place to set up the timeframe for when you want the van to charge up. The hybrid powertrain is comprised a 3.6L V6 running on the Atkinson cycle; two electric motors, and a 16-kW lithium-ion battery pack Total output is rated at 260 horsepower. Despite the added heft of the hybrid system, the Pacifica Hybrid is no slouch. The two electric motors provide instantaneous torque to help move the van at a surprising rate. The V6 will come on when more power is needed such as driving on the highway. One nice touch I like is how seamless the transition between electric and hybrid power is. The only sign aside from having the status screen up is the V6 turning on and off. One item I wish Chrysler would reconsider is offering the driver the ability to change between electric hybrid models that other plug-in hybrid offer. I understand why Chrysler decided not to do this as it might not be used by most drivers. But for a small group, including myself, it would nice to choose when the electric powertrain was in use to help conserve range. EPA says the 2018 Pacifica Hybrid will return 84 MPGe on electric power and 32 MPG when running on hybrid power. Overall electric range is rated at 33 miles. My averages for the week mirrored what I saw in the 2017 model - about 32 miles on electric range and an average fuel economy figure of 32. Having the Pacifica Hybrid for a week reminded me of one of the key issues that will face many, charging times. On a 120V outlet, it takes 16 hours for the battery to fully recharge. If you have a 240V charger, that drops to a reasonable 2 hours.  Handling is possibly one of the biggest surprises in the Pacifica Hybrid. The added heft of hybrid system allows the Pacifica to feel poised in the corners and have minimal body roll. Ride quality is the same as the standard Pacifica - almost all bumps are smoothed over. Road and wind noise are kept to almost silent levels. Pricing for the Pacifica Hybrid begins at $39,995 for the base Touring Plus and climbs to $44,995 for the Limited. My tester came to $49,825 with a few options, including the Advanced SafetyTec group that adds adaptive cruise control, surround view camera system, and blind spot monitoring. Sadly, this package isn’t available on lower trims.  There is the $7,500 federal tax credit and various state incentives that will be swayed around to draw some people in, but be forewarned those only come into effect when it is time to do taxes, not when you purchase the vehicle. Disclaimer: Chrysler Provided the Pacifica, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Gallery: Quick Drive: 2018 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid Limited
      Year: 2018
      Make: Chrysler
      Model: Pacifica Hybrid
      Trim: Limited
      Engine: 3.6L V6 eHybrid System
      Driveline: eFlite EVT,  Front-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 260 @ N/A (Combined)
      Torque @ RPM: N/A
      Fuel Economy: Gas + Electric Combined, Gas Combined - 84 MPGe, 32 MPG
      Curb Weight: 4,987 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Windsor, Ontario
      Base Price: $44,995
      As Tested Price: $49,825 (Includes $1,345 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Tri-Pane Panoramic Sunroof - $1,595.00
      Advanced SafetyTec - $995.00
      18-inch x 7.5-inch Polished Aluminum wheels - $895.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      It seems a bit odd to be driving the Giulia Ti almost half a year on from spending a week high-performance Quadrifoglio. This felt like I had a nice slice of cake and was now facing a bowl of vegetables. Trying to keep an open mind on Ti was going to be difficult, considering the mixed opinions I had with the first Giulia. But I knew that I had to try.
      I actually prefer the toned-down nature of Ti Sport compared to Quadrifoglio as lacks the aggressive bumper treatment and cloverleaf emblems on the fenders. Some items such as the uniquely styled wheels do carry over and add a small sporting touch. The only item I would change is the color. Grey just makes the design somewhat boring. The blue I had on the Quadrifoglio works much better as it allows the design to stand out. The interior is still very much a mixed affair. Most of the materials are what you would expect to find a luxury car of this caliber with soft-touch plastics, leather, and metal trim. But Alfa clearly cut some corners such as the cheap plastics used on the center console. The front sport seats provide excellent bolstering and comfort for any adventure you decide to take. Rear space is almost non-existent for most adults. Alfa Romeo did address one of my complaints with that I had with 2017 Giulia. 2018 models now have the option of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It is shame that it is an option, but it does make using infotainment system somewhat less frustrating. Some of the issues I had with the system in both the Giulia Quadrifoglio and Stelvio Ti are present in this Giulia. Going through a number of menus to accomplish simple tasks, slow performance, and a small number of crashes during my weeklong test. I really hope Alfa Romeo is working on some updates to get this system in order. Power comes from a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder delivering 280 horsepower and 306 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and optional Q4 all-wheel drive. I really liked this engine in the Stevlio as moved the compact crossover without breaking a sweat. In the Giulia, this engine makes this sedan fly away from stops. It is said the turbo-four can hit 60 mph in just over five seconds, which is fast for the class. One disappointment is the engine sounding like a diesel at idle, not something you want to have in an Italian sport sedan. EPA says the Giulia Ti with AWD will return 23 City/31 Highway/26 Combined. My average for the week landed around 23.6 in mostly city driving. One trait that both the Ti Sport and Quadrifoglio share is the handling. The chassis underneath allows the Giulia to dart around in the corners and keep body motions well in check. Steering is another bright spot where the vehicle would instantly respond to any input, along with provide good feedback. Ride quality is slightly better than the Quadrifoglio as only a small number of bumps come inside. Put the Giulia into Dynamic (sport mode) and the ride does become somewhat unbearable. Unfortunately, my Giulia Ti tester had an issue with the brakes. Whenever the brakes were applied, there was a noticeable screeching noise coming the rear of the vehicle. At first, I thought something had gotten lodged in the brakes. But the noise would go away after I had been driving for a bit. Park the car for awhile and drive it once again, the noise would return. This likely hints at something being warped - a bit disappointing for a vehicle that only had a few thousand miles on the odometer. The Giulia is one of those vehicles I really want to like a lot more than I currently do. Alfa Romeo still has a number of issues they need to address sooner than later. I only would recommend this model for those who understand what they’re getting into. Gallery: 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti Sport Q4
      Disclaimer: Alfa Romeo Provided the Giulia, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Alfa Romeo
      Model: Giulia
      Trim: Ti Sport Q4
      Engine: 2.0L Turbocharged MultiAir SOHC Inline-Four
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 280 @ 5,200
      Torque @ RPM: 306 @ 2,000 - 4,800
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 23/31/26
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Cassino, Italy
      Base Price: $41,995
      As Tested Price: $51,885 (Includes $1,295 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Ti Sport AWD Package 22S - $2,500.00
      Driver Assist Dynamic Plus Package - $1,500.00
      Ti Leather Package - $995.00
      8.8-inch AM/FM Bluetooth Radio with 3D Nav - $950.00
      Harman/Kardon Premium Audio System - $900.00
      Driver Assistance Static Package - $650.00
      Vesuvio Gray Metallic - $600.00
      19-inch x 8-inch Bright 5-Hole Aluminum Wheels - $500.00

      View full article
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