Jump to content
  • Greetings Guest!

    CheersandGears.com was founded in 2001 and is one of the oldest continuously operating automotive forums out there.  Come see why we have users who visit nearly every day for the past 16+ years. Signup is fast and free, or you can opt for a premium subscription to view the site ad-free.

William Maley

Ford News: Whats In Store for Ford's Product Plans

Recommended Posts

Last week, Ford CEO Jim Hackett unveiled his plans for the company. One key part of his plan is moving $7 billion from the development of cars to trucks. What does this entail? Car and Driver have done a bit of digging and has brought forth some answers.

Jim Farley, Ford’s president of global markets tells the magazine the company will focus on its regional strengths for future products. For the U.S., this means developing “authentic, off-road capable” vehicles according to him. That includes the upcoming EcoSport crossover, Ranger pickup, and Bronco SUV.

Ford is planning to focus on utility vehicles in other markets as well as they have found success with “styled, on-road performance" crossovers. Europe will begin seeing models that are “urban-utility products.” For Asia (in particular China), Ford will focus on the "C-plus" larger midsize segment and three-row SUVs.

As for cars, Farley said Ford will be repositioning products in certain markets to "lower-volume, higher-revenue sub-segments." For example, the Fiesta and Focus will become more upmarket.

Source: Car and Driver


View full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The growth of off-road trucks and SUV/CUV's makes one think America is giving up on having nice roads and just letting it go backwards with broken dirt roads like Russia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moving Fiesta or Focus upmarket is a terrible idea.  No one wants a $30,000 Fiesta, they buy the Fiesta or Focus because they can't afford a Fusion or can't afford a premium small car like a Mini or Audi A3, etc.  There are entry level buyers out there.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could see making a nicer trimmed Focus or Fiesta for the upper end of the market, but I can't see abandoning the low end of the market, particularly when they'll still need to build them low end for lower income markets. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

I could see making a nicer trimmed Focus or Fiesta for the upper end of the market, but I can't see abandoning the low end of the market, particularly when they'll still need to build them low end for lower income markets. 

But who wants a $35,000 Focus Titanium?  They can go buy an Acura ILX, Volvo S40, CLA, A3, 1-series, etc.  And get a nicer car, from a better brand at the same money.  This is why the Taurus SHO didn't sell, the Fusion Sport I never see either, because at $45k, no one wants a Ford Taurus when they can get an Acura or Lexus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, smk4565 said:

But who wants a $35,000 Focus Titanium?  They can go buy an Acura ILX, Volvo S40, CLA, A3, 1-series, etc.  And get a nicer car, from a better brand at the same money.  This is why the Taurus SHO didn't sell, the Fusion Sport I never see either, because at $45k, no one wants a Ford Taurus when they can get an Acura or Lexus.

I agree with you.... I'm just saying, if Ford wants to go that route, they shouldn't abandon the lower end also. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

I guess they are giving up on the lower end of the market, not enough profit.  

Remember when they had Mercury?  This is what the mid-market was for: to absorb those that did not want Ford but found Lincoln to be too expensive.  Ford could do one of two things: either make the Focus and Fiesta the same cheaper cars but build them in lower-cost markets, or simply cancel them both citing poor profit margins and build something else.  No idea which way they should go (let alone will go).

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, riviera74 said:

Remember when they had Mercury?  This is what the mid-market was for: to absorb those that did not want Ford but found Lincoln to be too expensive.  Ford could do one of two things: either make the Focus and Fiesta the same cheaper cars but build them in lower-cost markets, or simply cancel them both citing poor profit margins and build something else.  No idea which way they should go (let alone will go).

Mercury also had another purpose... not only to just be slightly nicer than a Ford (towards the end, that was hard to find)... but also to give Lincoln dealers some volume to work with.   Take the Escape v. MKC for example.  Base price for an MKC is right where the max price for the Escape is. Having Mercury in there to separate them would insulate the luxury Escapes from the base models, selling them at Lincoln dealers would give those franchises some breathing room.  They don't need to have a very wide range of costs.  Keep the packages simple, one engine the 2.0T, AWD standard, nicer interiors, but not Lincoln level.  It would allow Lincoln to move up without ford leaving behind customer wouldn't dain to fall back to a Ford branded car.   Kill the Taurus, bring back the Marquis and LTD on the Continental's frame.  LTD can to police/fleet duty, Marquie is for Avalon, Maxima, and high end Accord intenders. 

 

sigh.... I've gotta get back to writing Op Eds

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, smk4565 said:

Moving Fiesta or Focus upmarket is a terrible idea.  No one wants a $30,000 Fiesta, they buy the Fiesta or Focus because they can't afford a Fusion or can't afford a premium small car like a Mini or Audi A3, etc.  There are entry level buyers out there.

Yep, they just hand that sale over to another automaker not stupid enough to do that...people still want value in this segment.

Adding more trim levels might be a better idea....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Ford's plan is 3 cars in the US, Focus, Fusion, Mustang and that is it. Fiesta will be sold in Europe, Brazil, China, etc.  Lincoln will probably keep MKZ and Continental based on Fusion but I doubt they ever see a 3rd offering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am having a hard time not laughing out loud when I think "upmarket Fiesta".   The upmarket subcompacts are CUV's on the same platform..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, smk4565 said:

But who wants a $35,000 Focus Titanium?  They can go buy an Acura ILX, Volvo S40, CLA, A3, 1-series, etc.  And get a nicer car, from a better brand at the same money.  This is why the Taurus SHO didn't sell, the Fusion Sport I never see either, because at $45k, no one wants a Ford Taurus when they can get an Acura or Lexus.

Why would it cost 10k more than it does now? Yeah, it'll be more pricey but I don't think their intentions are to mess with faux luxury car territory. 

19 hours ago, smk4565 said:

Moving Fiesta or Focus upmarket is a terrible idea.  No one wants a $30,000 Fiesta, they buy the Fiesta or Focus because they can't afford a Fusion or can't afford a premium small car like a Mini or Audi A3, etc.  There are entry level buyers out there.

People pay for the garbage that the Germans put out in the 30k range so what's different? Also, there's no way there will be a 30k Fiesta. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The difference is that the perception of German brands is better than that of Ford.  There is a reason even VW can charge a premium over the direct competing car or CUV from Ford.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DetroitMuscle

Hi content, premium small cars are becoming very desirable. Ford seems to notice. I think they should go all in on it.  I think low-cost CUVs should also be an option, perhaps even replacing small cheap cars.  People end up in tiny little cars often because that's all they can afford. And that because they desire it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Ford has launched the configurator for the 2019 Ranger today and we got our first look at pricing. It will begin at $25,395 for the XL extended-cab model with 2WD - price includes $1,095 destination charge. Pricing for the rest of the lineup is as followed,
      $27,615 - XL SuperCrew 2WD $29,035 - XLT SuperCab 2WD $29,555 - XL SuperCab 4WD $31,210 - XLT SuperCrew 2WD $31,775 - XL SuperCrew 4WD $33,035 - XLT SuperCab 4WD $33,305 - Lariat SuperCab 2WD $35,210 - XLT SuperCrew 4WD $35,480 - Lariat SuperCrew 2WD $37,305 - Lariat SuperCab 4WD $39,480 - Lariat SuperCrew 4WD There are a number of options on offer such as appearance packages, spray-in bed liner, and 8-inch touchscreen with Sync3. Go crazy on the options, and you can have a Ranger that will cost you over $45,000. All Rangers come with a 2.3L EcoBoost four-cylinder paired up with a six-speed automatic.
      Compared to other models in the class, the Ranger has the highest base price. The Nissan Frontier is the cheapest at $19,965, followed by the Chevrolet Colorado ($21,590), GMC Canyon ($22,095), and Toyota Tacoma ($24,740).
      It still will be awhile before you can drive a Ranger off the dealer's lot as it will launch early next year.
      Source: Ford

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Ford has launched the configurator for the 2019 Ranger today and we got our first look at pricing. It will begin at $25,395 for the XL extended-cab model with 2WD - price includes $1,095 destination charge. Pricing for the rest of the lineup is as followed,
      $27,615 - XL SuperCrew 2WD $29,035 - XLT SuperCab 2WD $29,555 - XL SuperCab 4WD $31,210 - XLT SuperCrew 2WD $31,775 - XL SuperCrew 4WD $33,035 - XLT SuperCab 4WD $33,305 - Lariat SuperCab 2WD $35,210 - XLT SuperCrew 4WD $35,480 - Lariat SuperCrew 2WD $37,305 - Lariat SuperCab 4WD $39,480 - Lariat SuperCrew 4WD There are a number of options on offer such as appearance packages, spray-in bed liner, and 8-inch touchscreen with Sync3. Go crazy on the options, and you can have a Ranger that will cost you over $45,000. All Rangers come with a 2.3L EcoBoost four-cylinder paired up with a six-speed automatic.
      Compared to other models in the class, the Ranger has the highest base price. The Nissan Frontier is the cheapest at $19,965, followed by the Chevrolet Colorado ($21,590), GMC Canyon ($22,095), and Toyota Tacoma ($24,740).
      It still will be awhile before you can drive a Ranger off the dealer's lot as it will launch early next year.
      Source: Ford
    • By William Maley
      The One Ford plan brought in by former CEO Alan Mulally helped the automaker weather through some very tough times. A key part of this plan was cutting back on the number of architectures used around the world - from 30 to nine. But Ford is planning to go further with reducing them.
      Last week, Ford's head of product development and purchasing, Hau Thai-Tang revealed the company will be reducing the number of platforms to just five.
      "This is not saying One Ford was wrong. This is building on the strategy of One Ford and evolving from it," said Thai-Tang at the 2018 J.P. Morgan Auto Conference in New York.
      The move to five platforms will help save costs: According to Thai-Tang, 70 percent of a vehicle's value can be managed through modular platforms. It will also improve the efficiency of Ford's suppliers.
      The five platforms are as followed:
      RWD/AWD Body-on-Frame FWD/AWD Unibody RWD/AWD Unibody Commercial Van Unibody Electric Vehicle Unibody Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      The One Ford plan brought in by former CEO Alan Mulally helped the automaker weather through some very tough times. A key part of this plan was cutting back on the number of architectures used around the world - from 30 to nine. But Ford is planning to go further with reducing them.
      Last week, Ford's head of product development and purchasing, Hau Thai-Tang revealed the company will be reducing the number of platforms to just five.
      "This is not saying One Ford was wrong. This is building on the strategy of One Ford and evolving from it," said Thai-Tang at the 2018 J.P. Morgan Auto Conference in New York.
      The move to five platforms will help save costs: According to Thai-Tang, 70 percent of a vehicle's value can be managed through modular platforms. It will also improve the efficiency of Ford's suppliers.
      The five platforms are as followed:
      RWD/AWD Body-on-Frame FWD/AWD Unibody RWD/AWD Unibody Commercial Van Unibody Electric Vehicle Unibody Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
    • By William Maley
      When General Motors decided to study the Ford F-150 to help make the next-generation Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra, they sent engineers to the front door of where the F-150 is built. 
      According to Reuters, engineers went on a public factory tour of Ford's Dearborn truck plant to study how Ford was building them. Special attention was paid to workers attaching aluminum body panels to the trucks. After watching and timing the fitment of parts with stopwatches, GM engineers found some problems.
      “They had a real hard time getting those doors to fit,” said Tim Herrick, executive chief engineer for GM truck programs.
      Focusing on the doors, engineers bought F-150 doors as parts and took them apart. What they realized is that they could cut weight in their trucks with a combination of aluminum and thinner high strength steel for a lower cost. 
      GM could have gone all-aluminum with their trucks. Herrick said the debate at the company “was a really hotly contested item for us.” But at the end of the day, the decision to use mixed metals will allow for a larger profit on the trucks.
      “We think we have thousands of dollars advantage (over Ford) just in the aluminum costs. It’s big,” said Herrick.
      Source: Reuters

      View full article
  • My Clubs

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Reader Rides

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.