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William Maley

Jeep News: 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL is Slightly More Expensive

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With all of the new improvements and technology for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler, it was going to slightly more expensive. We now know how much more that will be.

Motor1 reports that when the Wrangler hits dealers early next year, it will have a starting price of $28,190 (includes a $1,195 destination charge) for the base 2-door Wrangler. This is an increase of $3,000 when compared to the 2017 model. All 2018 Wrangler models see an average increase of $3,020 to their base price.

You're not getting much with the Wrangler Sport. Standard equipment includes a six-speed manual gearbox, Dana axles, and 17-inch All Season Bridgestone tires. You'll need to shell out some cash if you want power windows and locks; keyless entry, and air conditioning. The Sahara is slightly better equipped with 18-inch alloy wheels, painted fenders, upgraded audio system, and power accessories. But Jeep is only offering the Sahara in the 4-door Unlimited which will set you back $38,540.

Rubicon models come equipped with a load of off-road goodies such as beefier Dana 44 axles, electronic locking differentials, automatic swaybar disconnects, upgraded transfer case, and BF Goodrich off-road tires. The Rubicon begins at $38,190 for the two-door and $41,690 for the four-door Unlimited.

Source: The Car Connection, Motor1


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Smart Move, no problem selling the new ones, but this will help those sitting on the fence and not wanting to spend the money to buy up the remaining ones on the lots now.

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1 hour ago, ocnblu said:

A crime is being committed.

 

What cha talkin about Willis? The 4 door only Sahara, the higher price or everything including FCA trying to survive off Jeep profits with crap everywhere else especially Fiat, Alfa, etc. all that Italian garbage.

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6 hours ago, ocnblu said:

A crime is being committed.

 

If you're thinking what I am thinking......can I say a lack of choice (or options) 

I feel if I am going to have to shell out some extra cash, then it better be made how I want it......

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$3000 is a pretty good chunk. I assume this will be first model year then maybe  an even more dumbed down version in a couple years.

$28,000 seems like a lot for a base model 2WD 2-door Wrangler though.. when you have to add A/C, power windows/locks.. okay maybe there can't be a lower priced Wrangler! 

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OUCH, Seems a 1 star rating by the European safety commision testing auto's. Makes me wonder how the 2019 version will test out here in the US.

Interesting statement: "It is truly disappointing to see a brand-new car being put on sale in 2018 with no autonomous braking system and no lane assistance," said Michiel van Ratingen, the secretary general of Euro NCAP, in a statement. "It is high time we saw a product from the Fiat Chrysler group offering safety to rival its competitors."

 In its statement to Roadshow, a Fiat Chrysler spokesperson said that an integrated radar and camera modulenestled behind the rearview mirror will give the 2019 Wrangler both automatic braking and adaptive cruise control capabilities.

jeep-wrangler-euro-ncap-promo.jpg
Euro 

https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/2018-jeep-wrangler-jl-euro-ncap-crash-test/

 

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1 hour ago, dfelt said:

OUCH, Seems a 1 star rating by the European safety commision testing auto's. Makes me wonder how the 2019 version will test out here in the US.

Interesting statement: "It is truly disappointing to see a brand-new car being put on sale in 2018 with no autonomous braking system and no lane assistance," said Michiel van Ratingen, the secretary general of Euro NCAP, in a statement. "It is high time we saw a product from the Fiat Chrysler group offering safety to rival its competitors." 

 

Those are optional novelties in the US on some vehicles, are they required equipment in Europe? 

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6 minutes ago, Robert Hall said:

Those are optional novelties in the US on some vehicles, are they required equipment in Europe? 

No, or else it wouldn't be sold there.  They're requirements to get 5 stars on the Euro NCAP tests though.

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      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 
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      Location of Manufacture: Detroit, Michigan
      Base Price: $86,200
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