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William Maley

Quick Drive: 2017 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off-Road Double Cab

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(Author’s Note: Before you ask, no this isn’t a typo. I really did drive a 2017 Tacoma in 2018. Due to some circumstances, the Tacoma took the place of another vehicle at the last minute. I didn’t realize it was a 2017 model until I saw the sticker. I’ll make note of the changes for 2018 towards the end of the piece.)

I’ll likely make some people annoyed with this line: The Toyota Tacoma is the Jeep Wrangler of the pickup world. Before you start getting banging on your keyboard, telling me how I am wrong, allow me to make my case. The two models have a number of similarities; off-road pedigree, not changing much in terms of design or mechanicals; and somewhat uncomfortable when driven on the road.

  • Since our last review of the Tacoma, not much has changed with the exterior. The TRD Off-Road package does make the Tacoma look somewhat mean with a new grille, 16-inch wheels wrapped meaty off-road tires, and a khaki paint color that looks like it came from an army base. 
  • The Tacoma’s interior is very user-friendly with a comprehensive and simple dash layout. Most controls are where you expect to find them and in easy reach. But some controls are placed in some odd locations. A key example is the hill descent control which is next to the dome lights on the ceiling.
  • Comfort is still almost nonexistent in the Tacoma. The front seats are quite firm and provide decent support. No height adjustment means a fair number of people will need to make comprises in comfort to find the right seating position. The back seat can fit adults, provided you don’t have anyone tall sitting in the front. Otherwise, legroom becomes very scarce.
  • Under the hood is a 3.5L V6 producing 278 horsepower and 265 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and four-wheel drive. At low speeds, the engine pulls quite strongly and smoothly. It is very different when traveling on the highway as the engine really needs to be worked to get up to speed at a somewhat decent rate. Part of this comes down to the automatic which likes to quickly upshift to maximize fuel economy. There is a ‘sport’ mode on the transmission that locks out fifth and sixth gear, but only improves performance marginally.
  • Fuel economy is towards the bottom with EPA figures of 18 City/23 Highway/20 Combined. My average for the week landed around 19.5 mpg.
  • TRD Off-Road brings forth a retuned suspension setup featuring a set of Bilstein shocks. Usually, this makes the ride is somewhat softer. But in the Tacoma, the ride is quite choppy on any surface that isn’t smooth. Steering is very slow and heavy, making tight maneuvers a bit difficult. A fair amount of wind and road noise is apparent.
  • Any changes to be aware of for the 2018 Tacoma? The only change of note is the addition of Toyota Safety Sense-P. This suite of active safety features includes automatic emergency braking, automatic high-beams, adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning, and lane departure warning.
  • The TRD Off-Road will set you back $35,515 for the Double Cab with the Long Bed - the 2018 model is about $1,410 more. With a few options, our as-tested price came to $40,617.

Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Tacoma, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

Year: 2017
Make: Toyota
Model: Tacoma Double Cab with Long Bed
Trim: TRD Off-Road
Engine: 3.5L D-4S V6 with Dual VVT-i 
Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
Horsepower @ RPM: 278 @ 6,000
Torque @ RPM: 265 @ 4,600 
Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/23/20
Curb Weight: 4,480 lbs
Location of Manufacture: San Antonio, TX
Base Price: $35,515
As Tested Price: $40,617 (Includes $960.00 Destination Charge)

Options:
Premium & Technology Package - $3,035.00
Tonneau Cover - $650.00
Carpet Floor Mats w/Door Sill Protector - $208.00
Mudguards - $129.00
Bed Mat - $120.00


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Lots of features to admire here, but why did they have to give it such a big chrome grill. I just do not get the chrome everything especially on an offroad purpose truck. 😕

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I want this exact truck.

34 minutes ago, dfelt said:

Lots of features to admire here, but why did they have to give it such a big chrome grill. I just do not get the chrome everything especially on an offroad purpose truck. 😕

The only things chrome on this truck is the grille and name badges. It's about as minimal as you'll find on a truck. 

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6 hours ago, ccap41 said:

I want this exact truck.

The only things chrome on this truck is the grille and name badges. It's about as minimal as you'll find on a truck. 

Guess with being a TRD, I would want all Monochromatic or use black chrome for a better off road look and darkness for disappearing in the woods. :P 

Think of this with black chrome replacing traditional chrome and black chrome rims or powder coated rims. That would be perfect IMHO.

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The TRD Pro is like what you're thinking of. 

They must not have had the brown Tacoma TRD Pro but they had the 4Runner and Tundra TRD Pros in the brown.

This is the Tacoma TRD Pro with the black grille and wheels.

4Runner.jpg

Tundra TRD.jpg

Tacoma TRD.jpg

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Being this is a TRD offroad, I would still expect this kind of treatment. Looks way better than chrome.

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