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William Maley

Dodge News: 2019 Dodge Charger Adds A Bit More Muscle

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While we're still waiting on anything concerning the next-generation Charger, Dodge has gone ahead and made a number of changes to the current model for the 2019 model year.

We'll begin with the base SXT and work our way to the SRT Hellcat, highlighting the various changes.

  • SXT: All-wheel drive becomes available on the base trim, bringing with it the more powerful 3.6L Pentastar V6 (300 horsepower and 264 pound-feet). Options now include  Houndstooth cloth sport seats, Caramel Nappa leather interior, updated Blacktop Package, and new Cold Weather Package.
  • GT: This model will now be positioned as performance-oriented model for the V6. It gets the 3.6L Pentastar V6 from the SXT AWD, but sends power to the rear-wheels. Previously, the GT was only available with AWD. Other mechanical changes include a performance suspension, 3.07 rear axle ration, and enhanced steering system. The exterior boasts a new performance hood, sculpted side sills, and a spoiler. A set of Houndstooth cloth bolstered performance seats, paddle shifters, and 8.4-inch UConnect system with Dodge Performance Pages make up the interior.
  • R/T: Becomes more aggressive in the looks department with a new performance hood, fascial, side sills, and spoiler. Under the skin is a standard performance suspension, 2.62 rear axle ration, and enhanced steering system. Power remains the 5.7L HEMI V8 with 370 horsepower and 395 pound-feet.
  • R/T Scat Pack: Gains Launch Assist (help minimize wheel hop and maximize grip) and Line Lock (to do those smoky burnouts). A new front grille features dual air inlets to provide additional cooling for the 392 HEMI V8 engine (485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet). A Satin Black-painted hood and Bilstein three-mode Adaptive Damping Suspension are on the options list.
  • SRT Hellcat: Adds Launch Assist, Line Lock, After-Run Chiller (keeps cooling down the supercharger/charge air cooler when the engine is turned off), and Torque Reserve (closes a bypass valve to prefill the supercharger and manages fuel flow and spark to create a "reserve of torque that is delivered upon acceleration from a standing stop). Other changes include a new grille with dual air inlets, optional Satin Black painted hood, and Alcantara interior package. 

The 2019 Charger lineup arrives at Dodge dealers in the third quarter.

Source: Dodge


Imposing New Face, Interior and New Performance Upgrades Lead Revamped Dodge Charger Performance Lineup for 2019

  • Dodge repositions the Charger lineup to include a new SXT all-wheel-drive (AWD) model and new Charger GT rear-wheel-drive (RWD) performance model; both are powered by the award-winning Pentastar 3.6-liter V-6 engine, which delivers up to 300 horsepower and up to 30 miles per gallon
  • Charger GT and R/T models receive a full complement of race-bred chassis upgrades and features along with new performance looks, such as a performance hood with air induction, styled fascia, sculpted side sills, decklid spoiler and seats
  • New for 2019, Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat and R/T Scat Pack feature standard performance upgrades, including Launch Assist and Line Lock; a new performance grille with dual air inlets; new Launch Control switch on R/T Scat Pack; and Torque Reserve, After-Run Chiller on SRT Hellcat

June 28, 2018 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - Dodge//SRT continues to run at full throttle in the North American large sedan segment, revamping the entire Charger lineup for 2019. As America’s only four-door muscle car and the sales leader in the segment five years running, Dodge continues to charge ahead of its competition with upgrades both inside and out.
 
New for 2019, Dodge is repositioning the Charger lineup into six distinct, attitude-infused models that offer a range of performance and powertrain options for every modern muscle-car customer. The lineup ranges from the 707-horsepower Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat – the quickest, fastest and most powerful sedan in the world – to the efficient V-6 power of the new Charger GT RWD performance model and the all-wheel-drive capability of the new SXT AWD model.
 
“Despite a shift toward utility vehicles in the United States over the past decade, the Dodge Charger and Challenger continue to buck the trend,” said Steve Beahm, Head of Passenger Car Brands, Dodge//SRT, Chrysler and FIAT – FCA North America. “Charger and Challenger retail sales have increased 70 percent since 2008, and since the launch of Scat Pack in August 2014, high-performance model sales increased from 4 percent to more than 25 percent. Charger is on track to lead the large car segment in the United States for the fifth straight year in 2018, and we intend to keep that string alive by updating the product to deliver the performance and capability that our customers demand.”
 
Dealer orders for the 2019 Dodge Charger open in late June 2018 and vehicles are scheduled to arrive in Dodge dealerships in the third quarter of 2018.

Charger SRT Hellcat
The 2019 Charger SRT Hellcat remains the quickest, fastest and most powerful sedan in the world with the supercharged 6.2-liter HEMI® V-8 that delivers 707 horsepower and 650 lb.-ft. of torque. The engine is mated to the quick-shifting TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission with steering wheel-mounted shift paddles.
 
New for 2019, the Charger SRT Hellcat features a new performance grille with dual inlets that feed cooler, outside air into the engine compartment. Bolstering the performance is the addition of four race-inspired technologies that come standard on Hellcat, including:

  • Launch Assist, which uses wheel speed sensors to watch for driveline-damaging wheel hop at launch and, in milliseconds, modifies the engine torque to regain full grip
  • Line Lock, which engages the front brakes to hold the Charger SRT Hellcat stationary, but leaves the rear wheels free for a burnout to heat up and clean the rear tires
  • After-Run Chiller, which keeps cooling the supercharger/charge air cooler after the engine is shut off
  • Torque Reserve, which closes a bypass valve to prefill the supercharger and manages fuel flow and spark advance to balance engine rpm and torque, generates a reserve of torque that is delivered upon acceleration from a standing stop

New instrument panel badging, a Satin Black painted hood option, available Brass Monkey 20-inch forged wheels and an Alcantara interior package are also new to Charger SRT Hellcat for the 2019 model year.
 
Charger R/T Scat Pack 
The 2019 Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack is the most muscle for the dollar, powered by the naturally aspirated 392 HEMI V-8, it delivers 485 horsepower and 475 lb.-ft. of torque, mated to the TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission, priced less than $40,000.
 
New for 2019, Launch Assist and Line Lock are now standard features on the R/T Scat Pack for optimum performance at launch from a standstill. A new switch on the dashboard provides quick access to initialize Launch Control, which coordinates the engine, transmission, driveline and suspension for an optimal launch and consistent straight-line acceleration.
 
R/T Scat Pack features the same new performance grille with dual air inlets as the SRT Hellcat and adds a new Scat Pack bee badge on the decklid, replacing the R/T badge. New Dark Dub Plate instrument panel and Houndstooth cloth performance seat with an added Scat Pack bee logo are also standard. Dual Carbon stripes, a Satin Black-painted hood and Bilstein three-mode Adaptive Damping Suspension are added to the available options.
 
Charger R/T 
The 2019 Dodge Charger R/T is powered by the iconic 5.7-liter HEMI V-8, rated at 370 horsepower and 395 lb.-ft. of torque and mated to the standard TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission.
 
For 2019, the Charger R/T adopts new performance looks and features standard, including the performance hood, fascia, sculpted side sills, spoiler and seats. Race-bred chassis upgrades, including a standard performance suspension, 2.62 rear axle ratio, enhanced steering, steering wheel with paddle shifters, Dodge Performance Pages with the 8.4-inch Uconnect screen, Houndstooth cloth bolstered performance seats, new Dark Dub Plate instrument panel, and new 20-inch Satin Carbon and Black Noise wheel options.
 
Available on the R/T is the new Cold Weather Package, which includes heated steering wheel, heated cloth driver and passenger seats.
 
Charger SXT AWD 
The Charger SXT AWD model, new for 2019, is powered by the award-winning Pentastar V-6 engine, rated at 300 horsepower and 264 lb.-ft. of torque, and mated to the TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission, delivering up to 27 mpg on the highway. The all-wheel-drive system is automatic with an active transfer case and front-axle disconnect, which helps minimize powertrain parasitic losses.
 
Available options on the SXT AWD are a new Caramel Nappa leather interior, Houndstooth cloth sport seats and the Blacktop Package, which includes a new 19-inch Black Noise wheel. The new Cold Weather Package is also available on the SXT AWD, which includes heated steering wheel and heated cloth driver and passenger seats.
 
Charger GT 
The new Dodge Charger GT RWD performance model is powered by the award-winning Pentastar V-6 engine, rated at 300 horsepower and 264 lb.-ft. of torque and mated to the TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission.
 
For 2019, the GT adopts new performance looks and features standard, including performance hood, fascia, sculpted side sills, spoiler and seats. Race-bred chassis upgrades, including a standard performance suspension, 3.07 rear axle ratio, enhanced steering with paddle shifters, Dodge Performance Pages with the 8.4-inch Uconnect screen, Houndstooth cloth bolstered performance seats, new Dark Dub Plate instrument panel, and new 20-inch Satin Carbon and Black Noise wheel options.
 
The new Cold Weather Package is also available on GT, including heated steering wheel and heated cloth driver and passenger seats.
 
Charger SXT 
The powerful, roomy and solid Charger SXT model is powered by the standard Pentastar 3.6-liter V-6, rated at 292 horsepower and 260 lb.-ft. of torque, working with a TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission. For 2019, Charger SXT includes electronic stability control, remote start, cruise control, electric power steering, capless fuel filler, automatic halogen projector headlamps with LED accents and three 12-volt power outlets.
 
Available options for SXT include Houndstooth cloth sport seats, a new Caramel Nappa leather interior, the popular Blacktop Package, which includes a new 20-inch Black Noise wheel, and the new Cold Weather Package, which includes heated steering wheel and heated cloth driver and passenger seats.
 
Charger Exterior Colors
Available exterior colors for all 2019 Dodge Charger models include B5 Blue, Destroyer Grey, F8 Green, Go Mango, Granite Crystal, IndiGo Blue, Maximum Steel, Octane Red, Pitch Black, Plum Crazy, TorRed, Triple Nickel and White Knuckle.


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I really like the look of this Charger. SWEET! :metal: 

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More muscle? I was hoping for a bump in something. Just using the same tune the "regular" v6 already has isn't much of adding anything. 

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1 hour ago, ccap41 said:

More muscle? I was hoping for a bump in something. Just using the same tune the "regular" v6 already has isn't much of adding anything. 

Seems they did get more Muscle, The Demon Engine is now standard in the Hellcat.

https://www.motor1.com/news/250478/2019-dodge-challenger-srt-hellcat-redeye/

Very cool all the stuff that is added according to the story above.

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36 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

That's the Challenger, not Charger. 

Based on reading here and at Motor1,

https://www.motor1.com/news/250475/2019-dodge-charger-updated-trims/

It is the same motor with a detuned ECU, this would tell me that I could take the Challenger ECU code and update the Charger. Then you have the same HP / ft-lbs.

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This is also the same press release they will use for the 2029 Charger, except the Pentastar V6 will make 305 hp and 268 lb-ft of torque by then.

Remember when the Cadillac CTS had a 304 hp V6... in 2008.

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True, there is no lack of power here.   But this chassis is 14 years old now, and it was old when they got it, LOL.

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You mean when Daimler FORCED Chrysler to buy old components at brand new component pricing in order to strip mine capital out of ChryCo?

No body knows or cares about 'platform age'- it's NOT a consumer issue whatsoever.
They don't have a shelf life; if they meet crash standards, are relatively stiff & not too heavy; spending a buncha millions on a new one that's 1.5% stiffer and 2% lighter just doesn't move the consumer needle.

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3 hours ago, balthazar said:

So we're going to bitch about the base V6 not giving more performance when there's 370, 485 and 700 HP above it???

Thinking so...

Hell, I'll take it!

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I wonder how many of these changes to the 2019 Charger will show up in the Chrysler 300.

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14 hours ago, balthazar said:

So we're going to bitch about the base V6 not giving more performance when there's 370, 485 and 700 HP above it???

No, the article title is a little misleading. 

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16 hours ago, smk4565 said:

True, there is no lack of power here.   But this chassis is 14 years old now, and it was old when they got it, LOL.

Still lying. 

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16 hours ago, balthazar said:

You mean when Daimler FORCED Chrysler to buy old components at brand new component pricing in order to strip mine capital out of ChryCo?

No body knows or cares about 'platform age'- it's NOT a consumer issue whatsoever.
They don't have a shelf life; if they meet crash standards, are relatively stiff & not too heavy; spending a buncha millions on a new one that's 1.5% stiffer and 2% lighter just doesn't move the consumer needle.

Daimler lost $27 billion on Chrysler, Chrysler screwed them, not the other way around.

Cerebus lost money on Chrysler, although not much since they were able to sell Chrysler finance to TD Bank, otherwise they would have taken a bath.  

The US government took a $1.3 billion loss on Chrysler after the bailout and sale to Fiat.  And that was the 2nd government bailout, at least Chrysler paid the money back the first time.  But this company bleeds money, and the only way FCA will get their money out is to sell off pieces to get quick cash inflows.  Sergio knows it, whoever takes Sergio's place knows it, so don't be surprised when it happens.

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2 hours ago, smk4565 said:

Daimler lost $27 billion on Chrysler, Chrysler screwed them, not the other way around.

Cerebus lost money on Chrysler, although not much since they were able to sell Chrysler finance to TD Bank, otherwise they would have taken a bath.  

The US government took a $1.3 billion loss on Chrysler after the bailout and sale to Fiat.  And that was the 2nd government bailout, at least Chrysler paid the money back the first time.  But this company bleeds money, and the only way FCA will get their money out is to sell off pieces to get quick cash inflows.  Sergio knows it, whoever takes Sergio's place knows it, so don't be surprised when it happens.

http://money.cnn.com/2007/05/14/news/companies/chrysler_sale/

Actually according to the news Daimler paid 37 Billion and the sale did not get any money actually into Chrysler as the money being paid for the 80.1% equity ownership went into Chrysler to keep it afloat and Daimler paid $650 million to unload it. Then a year later the Chrysler declare bankruptcy and the rest of the 19.9% holding became worthless as a write off for Daimler as their investors pushed them to dump the American brands.

Many other stories seem to imply that Daimler did not recover anything except for the Platform and suspension parts that Chrysler / Dodge were obligated to buy during that period of time.

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      The interior looks more expressive with a layered dashboard design and faux stitching around both the dash and transmission. In traditional Toyota fashion, controls for the various functions are within easy reach. An eight-inch screen mounted high on the dash is standard on Corolla Hatchbacks and comes with the latest version of Entune. As I have noted in other 2019 Toyotas, the updated Entune is noticeably quicker when switching between various functions. Also appreciated is the integration with Apple CarPlay which gives a driver another choice for infotainment. Those with Android phones will need to get their hands on the 2020 model. What I do wish is that Toyota had made the interface slightly more modern and added other colors that weren’t 50 shades of grey. 
      If you find yourself riding in the Corolla Hatchback, be sure to nab the front seat. Those sitting in the back will find space for their legs to be quite small. This isn’t helped with the narrow rear door openings. At least no one will have any complaints with the headroom as the hatchback has plenty of it. It gets even worse when you open up the rear tailgate and you’re presented with a minuscule 17.8 cubic feet of space behind the rear seats. The new Mazda3 offers more space at 20.1.
      Power comes from a new 2.0L four-cylinder producing 168 horsepower and 151 pounds-feet of torque, a noticeable increase from the outgoing Corolla iM - 137 HP and 126 lb-ft. This has moved overall performance impressions from poor to adequate as the hatchback is noticeably quicker around town. Country and highway driving are still a weak point as you’ll need to jam the gas to get any real movement from the engine. I would like to see either Toyota introduce a small turbo engine or figure out how to have torque readily available at a lower rpm. 
      My test vehicle was fitted with an optional CVT; a six-speed manual is standard. This CVT is different from others as Toyota fitted a fixed first gear ratio that it uses when leaving a stop. This reduces the rubber-band-type delay when accelerating and makes it feel more like a conventional automatic.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the Corolla Hatchback with the CVT are 32 City/42 Highway/36 Combined. My average for the week landed around 36.1 mpg.
      One area that the Corolla Hatchback’s predecessor impressed me was the handling. It felt planted and had surprising reflexes when going through a bend, but the rubbery steering did let it down. The Corolla Hatchback carries this torch as it feels even sharper with less body roll and a nimble feel. Steering is improved as well with a more natural feel when turning. I’ll still put the last-generation Mazda3 and Volkswagen Golf as the best-handling models in the class, but Corolla Hatchback isn’t too far behind.
      Despite its sporting intentions, the Corolla Hatchback coped very well on Detroit’s shambolic roads with most bumps and ruts being smoothed over. Part of this comes down to the SE having 16-inch wheels, allowing for more sidewall. Road noise is kept out, but there is a fair amount of wind noise that enters when driving on the freeway.
      Toyota pulled most of the stops out when working on the Corolla Hatchback and their efforts have paid off. It is the best looking Corolla in quite some time, offers surprising handling characteristics, and comes well equipped for the money. The SE begins at $21,090 and that includes adaptive cruise control, pre-collision system with pedestrian detection, eight-inch touchscreen, and LED lighting. Where the Corolla Hatchback loses ground is rear-seat space and cargo room which trails competitors by a significant amount. That’s the make or break decision as to whether you should or shouldn’t consider one.
      Nevertheless, Toyota has done the seemingly impossible: Made the Corolla interesting.
      Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Corolla Hatchback, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2019
      Make: Toyota
      Model: Corolla Hatchback
      Trim: SE
      Engine: 2.0L DOHC 16-Valve D4S Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, CVT
      Horsepower @ RPM: 168 @ 6,600
      Torque @ RPM: 151 @ 4,800 
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 32/42/36
      Curb Weight: 3,060 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Toyota, Aichi, Japan
      Base Price: $21,090
      As Tested Price: $23,639.00 (Includes $920.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      SE Preferred Package - $1,400.00
      Carpet Mat Package - $229.00
    • By Drew Dowdell
      2019 Mazda CX-5 Signature
      Mazda is on a mission lately to make their products feel more premium. They have been tuning their vehicles to be quieter and more refined in order to give them an air that they are above their class. This second generation of the Mazda CX-5 debuted for the 2017 model year with a 2.5-liter naturally aspirated 4-cylinder producing 187 horsepower and 186 lb.-ft of torque.  For 2019, Mazda added the 2.5-liter turbocharged engine from the CX-9. On regular gas, the engine produces 227 horsepower and 310 lb.-ft of torque, but if you fill it up with 93 octane, the horsepower figure bumps up to 250.  Available only on the Grand Touring and Signature trims, the 2.5-T makes the CX-5 the compact crossover with the most available torque.  Mazda sent a CX-5 Signature for me to try for a week to see what I thought.
      There’s no replacement for displacement… maybe
      The biggest CX-5 news for 2019 is the engine options. There is the 2.5-T mentioned above and a 2.2-liter turbo diesel. Both are exciting entries into a relatively conservative segment.  The 2.5-T is the second-largest displacement engine available in the segment, behind the 3.2 liter V6 in the Jeep Cherokee.  This 4-cylinder puts out quite a bit more torque than the bigger V6, though the Jeep produces more horsepower (271 @ 6,500 rpm). Even among 4-cylinders, this is the largest displacement you can get, but none of those others offering 2.5 liters also offers a turbocharger. This engine is rated by the EPA to get 22 city / 27 highway.  I got about 24 mpg in mostly city driving. Zero to 60 is a claimed 6.2 seconds.
      Under normal driving, the engine is quiet and composed, with torque coming on quickly when called for. When the pedal is mashed at speed, the CX-5 leaps forward with minimal turbo lag and gives off a strong growl from under the hood. The only time you can really feel any lag in the turbo is if you are starting from a dead stop. Overall, you never feel without power at the tip of your toes and the sounds, and lack of sounds, from the engine room is quiet and refined.
      One area the CX-5 falls behind on is in the transmission department. Although the transmission offers smooth shift and is willing to downshift when called upon, a 6-speed automatic almost feels anachronistic in a time when all of its direct competition is sporting 8 or 9 speeds. I never thought there would come a day when 6-forward gears aren’t enough, but here we are. Adding 2 or 3 more gears to the CX-5 would further liven up the already sporty crossover and help keep the turbocharged engine firmly in the good places of its torque band.
      Ride: Al dente – Firm but tender
      If there is a brand that Mazda is looking to emulate here by being premium without the premium badge, it would likely be BMW.  The ride is firm, but not so harsh as to spill your latte. Steering is on the heavy side with precise control and great on-center feel.  Body roll is minimal. Pushing the CX-5 into corners is fun and the standard G-Vectoring Control Plus makes sure you stay planted where you intended to be.  The i-ACTIV all-wheel-drive mostly runs in front-wheel-drive mode until microscopic amounts of wheel slip are detected and then some torque is instantly transferred to the rear wheels.  Mazda programs the AWD system to always have at least a little bit of torque going to the rear in order for the transfer of torque to happen faster. 
      It’s what’s inside that matter most
      Inside the CX-5, the premium story continues. There is a distinct lack of cheap plastic even in places where they could probably get away with it. The dash and door panels are made of soft-touch material and there is a tasteful amount of chrome trim. Though the seats look black in pictures, they are actually a very dark brown that Mazda calls Caturra Brown Nappa leather. This leather is a feature of the Signature trim level and they are both heated and ventilated.  Rear passengers get heated outboard seats as well, controlled from inside the fold-down center armrest. Also, a feature of the Signature trim is the real wood dash inlay and ambient cabin lighting. The seats in the CX-5 are very comfortable with just the right combination of support and cushion. They would be most welcome companions on a long road trip. The rear seats are fairly flat and do not offer a lot of legroom.  There is no adjustment fore and aft.  Wind and tire noise has been kept to a minimum.
      There are 4 USB ports, two in the up front armrest and two in the rear armrest. Only one of them allows a connection to the infotainment system.  Oddly, the USB ports don’t seem to put out much juice as my phones were very slow to charge from them.
      The infotainment system is another area similar to BMW.  The unit is controlled by a large dial in the center console or touch screen controls. I found the touch aspect to be laggy and a long reach, so I found myself using the dial. Using the dial to navigate is simple enough, but the menus and layout of the screen could probably use a re-think.  Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are both here, for some reason only Apple CarPlay can be activated by touch. Operating either system is frustrating with the dial however, this is especially true for Android Auto which I found frustrating to use without touch screen functionality. At least, unlike BMW, Mazda doesn’t charge you an extra subscription fee to use them. Sound from the Bose speakers was clear, but not especially great.
      There was a time when people mostly bought crossovers for the utility of hauling lots of bulky stuff home from the store, however, these days are different. Now, crossovers are a fashion statement.  Still, the CX-5 has 59.6 cubic feet of space with the rear seats folded and 30.9 cubic feet with the seats up.  That is at the high end of mid-pack in the segment with the Honda CR-V being the leader, while the Toyota RAV-4, Chevy Equinox, and Ford Escape all have less. 
      Do you need a safe space? This may be it.
      The Mazda CX-5 Signature comes with a whole host of safety equipment and the center of it all is the heads-up display that keeps the driver informed.  Blind Spot Monitoring, Lane-Keep Assist, and Radar Cruise Control, all have status lights in the heads-up display.  I found the blind spot monitoring system to be especially helpful when I was backing out onto a busy street with limited visibility.  Radar Cruise control is one of my favorite systems of all and I feel it should be standard equipment on all cars. The CX-5 can even read speed limit and stop signs as you approach, changing and updating the local regulations in the heads up display.
      The Signature also comes with active headlights that turn when you turn to help see around corners. They helped me spot a deer on the side of the road I normally would not have seen.
      The Verdict
      The CX-5 Signature is the top of the CX-5 line, so naturally, the price is reflected in that. With an MSRP of $36,890 before any options, the CX-5 may seem pricey, but it comes with everything you could possibly want.  However, when you compare it to other small crossovers with similar equipment it actually ends up comparing favorably to others in its class. I priced out Jeep Cherokee Overland with the 2.0T and technology group and the MSRP is $41,685. A GMC Terrain Denali with all the same option boxes checked? $41,430.  A Honda CR-V can’t even be equipped like the CX-5 because there is no up-level engine option, yet it still rings up to $38,147.
      Overall, Mazda has produced a handsome, sporty, fun to drive crossover with enough utility to remain competitive. They’ve loaded it with safety equipment and kept the price in check. It is definitely worth a look.
       

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