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William Maley

Jeep News: Why No Turbo-Four in the Jeep Gladiator?!

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We have been wondering for some time why the mild-hybrid eTorque powertrain was missing from the Gladiator's available powertrains. The eTorque powertrain pairs a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder with a 48-volt mild hybrid system. This not only improves overall fuel economy, but provides slightly more torque than the 3.6L V6 - 295 vs. 260 pound-feet. We assumed the reason came down to possible issues with towing. It seems our hunch was right.

The Drive reached out to FCA to see why the Gladiator wasn't being offered with the eHybrid. This was the response from the spokesperson.

"The 3.6-liter engine can handle the temperatures seen while towing."

Reading between the lines, it seems Jeep doesn't expect eHybrid powertrain to handle the towing duties of a pickup truck. The Gladiator is rated to tow a max of 7,650 pounds, beating the Chevrolet Colorado Diesel by 50 pounds.

Source: The Drive


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Wise decision.  Save the hybrids for Chrysler cars and minivans.

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38 minutes ago, riviera74 said:

Wise decision.  Save the hybrids for Chrysler cars and minivans.

But I thought RAM had a Tow capable 48V Hybrid system already? Why not use it here?

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Just now, dfelt said:

But I thought RAM had a Tow capable 48V Hybrid system already? Why not use it here?

Maybe packaging issues?   The RAM has a lot more space than the Wrangler/Gladiator under the hood...

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36 minutes ago, dfelt said:

But I thought RAM had a Tow capable 48V Hybrid system already? Why not use it here?

That's hooked up to the V6 and like @Robert Hall said, they may have run into some packing issues.

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No benefit to the system.  Ram Rebel E-torque is rated for 22 MPG and gets 17.5 in real world testing over to the TFL... worse than the high-powered 6 cylinder in the Raptor and the good ol' 5.3 in the Chevy Trail boss.  All that for a hefty price premium over the normal Hemi.  LOL.

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Well, if you’re out in the middle of nowhere, where are you going to charge it? 😮 

Just not sure of the use in a Jeep.....

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31 minutes ago, daves87rs said:

Well, if you’re out in the middle of nowhere, where are you going to charge it? 😮 

Just not sure of the use in a Jeep.....

FCA 48V hybrid system assists the ICE power train with much added instant torque and reduced fuel consumption. You can run it on pure gas and still get the electric benefits, you just would not have pure electric range till the battery was charged up.

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1 hour ago, dfelt said:

FCA 48V hybrid system assists the ICE power train with much added instant torque and reduced fuel consumption. You can run it on pure gas and still get the electric benefits, you just would not have pure electric range till the battery was charged up.

Yeah, I know-just being sassy.. 😉 

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On 12/6/2018 at 10:57 AM, Robert Hall said:

Maybe packaging issues?   The RAM has a lot more space than the Wrangler/Gladiator under the hood...

An E-class has a 48 volt hybrid and 6 cylinder under the hood, if it fits there, I am sure it would fit in a Jeep.

They have a turbo 4 in the Silverado, so how can they make it work and not overheat but Jeep can not?

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