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Trading on nostalgia for a 50 y.o. fastback is NOT a sustainable business model.  I highly doubt they will succeed.

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38 minutes ago, riviera74 said:

Trading on nostalgia for a 50 y.o. fastback is NOT a sustainable business model.  I highly doubt they will succeed.

Short term they will succeed, but long term, I agree unless they morph into something else, this will be a dead end business in a decade.

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But my point was in 1993 lots of rebuildable cores existed. Not so much now. 

Also...if you were 30 in 1966 and bought a new Mustang...you would be 82 now. Not exactly prime age for rolling around on a garage floor underneath a rusty relic.

I get you RE available cores- there are less builders out there vs. '93, but there are also MORE restored/hot rodded Mustangs to choose from. Aviar isn't marketing a roller project car, but one already done. That pool is exponentially larger.

Consider a vehicle like the Aviar as like an audi R8- extremely small sales. It (if it were actually brought to market) would be extremely limited production. Look how long the avanti continued after '64- decades. The tipping point will be what it always is- price.

This tho:
>>"if you were 30 in 1966 and bought a new Mustang...you would be 82 now<<
I believe is misguided. Vintage Mustangs aren't cool because the original buyers remember them, but because of their appeal as a sporty icon. All 3 of my vintage rides rolled off the assembly line before I did. My brother's 3 vintage cars are all also older than he is. My buddy has 2 '67s because he was born in '67, but all his other keepers are older than him. I believe / have observed that the 'original buyer/direct remembrance' hobbyist is a very small percentage of vintage car owners.
       
        In other words; 82 yr old owners aren't pushing '66 Shelby Mustangs to $250,000 sale prices.

Edited by balthazar

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1 hour ago, balthazar said:

But my point was in 1993 lots of rebuildable cores existed. Not so much now. 

Also...if you were 30 in 1966 and bought a new Mustang...you would be 82 now. Not exactly prime age for rolling around on a garage floor underneath a rusty relic.

I get you RE available cores- there are less builders out there vs. '93, but there are also MORE restored/hot rodded Mustangs to choose from. Aviar isn't marketing a roller project car, but one already done. That pool is exponentially larger.

Consider a vehicle like the Aviar as like an audi R8- extremely small sales. It (if it were actually brought to market) would be extremely limited production. Look how long the avanti continued after '64- decades. The tipping point will be what it always is- price.

This tho:
>>"if you were 30 in 1966 and bought a new Mustang...you would be 82 now<<
I believe is misguided. Vintage Mustangs aren't cool because the original buyers remember them, but because of their appeal as a sporty icon. All 3 of my vintage rides rolled off the assembly line before I did. My brother's 3 vintage cars are all also older than he is. My buddy has 2 '67s because he was born in '67, but all his other keepers are older than him. I believe / have observed that the 'original buyer/direct remembrance' hobbyist is a very small percentage of vintage car owners.
       
        In other words; 82 yr old owners aren't pushing '66 Shelby Mustangs to $250,000 sale prices.

I think we are on the same page...and yes...as an Audi R8 type of buyer...this is cool.

I just have remorse over the millions of Mustangs not saved. Lots of cores could have been reborn with Dynacorn metal.

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1 hour ago, A Horse With No Name said:

I just have remorse over the millions of Mustangs not saved. Lots of cores could have been reborn with Dynacorn metal.

True, but seldom financially sensible. And there are 10s of thousands of '60s Mustangs out there; when I go to a general car show, I'm sick of Camaros & Mustangs.

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7 hours ago, balthazar said:

True, but seldom financially sensible. And there are 10s of thousands of '60s Mustangs out there; when I go to a general car show, I'm sick of Camaros & Mustangs.

Actually they have become rather uncommon around Columbus here. I have only seen a couple of each over the course of the last year in terms of the 65 to 73 era.

Mostly car shows around here have gone to late model imports and exotics.

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4 hours ago, A Horse With No Name said:

Actually they have become rather uncommon around Columbus here. I have only seen a couple of each over the course of the last year in terms of the 65 to 73 era.

Mostly car shows around here have gone to late model imports and exotics.

Weird part here in Seattle is the white boys love the asian auto's and the asian boys love the american pony cars. Very weird to see this at the local car club shows.

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1 hour ago, dfelt said:

Weird part here in Seattle is the white boys love the asian auto's and the asian boys love the american pony cars. Very weird to see this at the local car club shows.

Car scene around here has become mostly exotics and trucks it would seem. I have kind of lost contact with it as I have kind of lost interest with much of what is going on. 

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